Tag Archive | "Helpline House"

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Aging Well: Your Most Important Resource—Resources (Especially Housing)

by Jeannette Franks, PhD, Gerontologist

jeanette top ad In many ways Bainbridge Island is a resource-rich community. Many of the resources we offer, such as a food bank (206-842-7621), a senior center (206-842-1616), and a volunteer network (206-842-4441), can be found in most prosperous communities. But on Bainbridge we also have housing services through the Housing Resources Board (HRB).

HRB, the Island’s “affordable housing” agency, owns and maintains 50 rentals on Bainbridge and shares ownership of another 50 units at Island Terrace Apartments. HRB provides a home to a diverse community of all ages including retirees, the disabled, and working families with children. HRB offers two programs remarkable in scope and services that are important for seniors: the Independent Living Program and HomeShare.

I am particularly impressed with the Independent Living Program, which helps residents stay safely in their own homes. The program underwrites home modifications to remove health and accessibility barriers and is a huge factor in helping people ‘age in place.’

Coordinator Julie Stone is experienced in meeting client needs and setting priorities. If you’ve got a problem, she can help figure out a way to solve it. Julie told me a story about a frail woman who was getting along just fine in her equally aged house. The only problem was her deteriorating, leaking roof, which might necessitate that she leave her home. The poor conditions affected air quality. She could not afford a new roof, and she felt unable to assess contractors’ recommendations. Julie worked with a contractor and secured generous Independent Living funding primarily made available by the City of Bainbridge Island. The woman is able to continue to live in her own home.

Typical modifications include

  • bathroom improvements and grab bar installations,
  • stair and handrail improvements,
  • improved air quality, and
  • wheelchair ramps.

Julie responds to all requests for in-home assessments. Applicants may own or rent their homes. There is no age restriction. Contracted work happens with client approval and is carried out by licensed and insured contractors.

The HomeShare Program matches those with space available in their homes who need extra income or help around the house with those who need an affordable housing opportunity. HRB provides support by screening local applicants and matching them with local home providers.

HRB also offers Emergency Rental Assistance. This is crucial for keeping families in their homes during a crisis, providing rent or mortgage payments to people who need time to survive rough waters. This service is provided through Helpline House.

The 25-year-old HRB has grown from a few apartments at Island Home to nearly 100 units, including single-family homes at Ferncliff Village, where all 24 homes are occupied. The second phase of the community is planned for next year. Six years ago, HRB adapted the Community Land Trust Model to all its properties. At Ferncliff, residents own their homes, but the land is held in community land trust through the Housing Resources Board.

Related Stories 

Photo by Linus Bohman.

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Roots shopping bag sales

BHS Basketball Celebrates a Season of Giving the Community $18,000

Tonight’s (February 7) Spartan basketball matchups against Lakeside will be not just about racking up points for the team. They will also be about the team giving back to the Bainbridge community. Boys’ Team Head Coach Scott Orness said that in 2013, Roots Basketball, the charitable organization built around the basketball program on Bainbridge, has raised—in cash and in contributions—over $18,000 for various local causes.

At tonight’s games, Orness and Girls’ Team Head Coach Nicole Hebner will be presenting a $4,000 check to Mark Blatter, the Executive Director of Housing Resources Board. The money comes from a Roots basketball tote bag fundraiser. The teams are also asking fans to bring canned food for Helpline House to tonight’s games. Last year, the teams collected about 390 items.

Roots has also raised $3,000 for new glass backboards and pads at Woodward, thanks in part, said Orness, to the coordinating efforts of the Bainbridge Island School District Director of Facilities and Capital Projects, Tamela Van Winkle. The Woodward PTO matched the donation and Toilsome Construction donated the installation labor.

In addition, the program raised $2,125 for the boys’ HS program and $2125 for the girls’ HS program, gave out $3080 in financial aid, and donated $3,460 to the Bainbridge Boys Boosters.

The Roots mission statement  is “Participants will leave our program as better players and as positive contributing members of or local and global community.” Whatever the outcomes of tonight’s games, the teams have already made a lot of very good points.

The JV games are at 3:15 and 4:45. The Girls’ Varsity game starts at 6:15, followed by the Boys at 8. All the games are in the BHS gym.

Related Stories:

Photo by Scott Orness.

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As Seahawks Win Inside Century Field, Seattle Homeless Outside Stay Warm with Bainbridge Help

Yesterday, as the Seahawks battled it out with the 49ers in an exciting, down-to-the-wire match, and thousands of Seahawks fans generated yet another seismic event on an already tremulous fault line, homeless people huddled under the viaduct, trying to stay warm, or panhandled the fans or looked for food. Maybe some of them listened to the game on transistor radios. Maybe a lot of them didn’t really care what was happening in the nearby noisy arena. But, regardless of their interest, several hundred of them were a little warmer than a month ago. That’s because of the work and generosity of a number of Islanders.

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Bainbridge warms the hearts (and heads) of Seattle homeless.

Knit Purl Give

On January 5, Bainbridge Realtor Ty Evans’ Knit Purl Give project, which tasked Island knitters with making hats and scarves for Seattle’s homeless, delivered the first 60 items to homeless people. Evans and a friend headed to the Union Gospel Mission on 2nd Avenue and some other spots on 1st and opened boxes of knitted wear, inviting people to take hats and scarves. Evans said that one man asked if there was a hat in Seahawks’ colors—unfortunately, there wasn’t, but he seemed happy with his chosen hat anyway. A woman asked if it was okay for her to take one if she already had a hat—Evans said she should as it would help her stay warmer.

One knitter sent a box of items from Florida—he had picked up some kits when visiting the Island. Evans said another knitter had donated a huge bag of brightly colored yarn to the project. One woman called at the last minute to say she wanted to participate but there were no more project kits at Churchmouse Yarns and Teas. Evans happily paid for another one so the woman could join in the effort. Another woman made an entire boxful of items herself.

Evans told me that she can’t even knit a hat. But she does know how to knit a scarf, so that’s what she did. Plus, even more important, she and her daughter launched the Knit Purl Give project last November, footing the bill for the dozens of hat and scarf kits made available through Churchmouse. The project was so successful that she intends to turn it into an annual event.

Columbia Sportswear Donation

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Part of the Columbia Sportswear clothing donation at the MID offices.

Then on the 10th, Andie Mackin, the Executive Director of the Bainbridge Island Downtown Association, who had been helping coordinate the distribution of the hats, met with Dave Willard, the Manager of Seattle’s Hospitality and Safety Program, to deliver the rest of the hats and scarves. But Mackin, who visited Willard with her daughter who was home from college, was there for another reason as well. She had secured a generous donation from Columbia Sportswear of four pallets with 64 boxes of winter gear, and she and her daughter were there to help Willard and his crew sort through the items and figure out how to distribute them to needy people.

Several years ago, when Mackin worked for IslandWood in Community Engagement, she realized that “many of the inner-city students who came out for the School Overnight Program didn’t own proper rain gear, boots, and outdoor clothing.” In 2002, when the program launched, IslandWood had a well-stocked gear shed with backpacks, rain gear, and assorted other items, but most of the gear has worn out by the time Mackin got involved. So she contacted Columbia Sportswear , and the company provided IslandWood with a donation of heavy duty rain gear, backpacks, and boots that, Mackin said, “has kept thousands of kids warm and dry.”

Dave Willard and his crew with the Columbia clothes.

Dave Willard and his crew with the Columbia clothes.

When she was coordinating the Knit Purl Give project with Willard, Mackin realized that “there was probably much greater need on the streets of Seattle, beyond the hats.” So again she reached out to Columbia, which sent to Willard’s office on 4th Avenue the pallets of gently repaired items through the Company’s “ReThreads” program. Before heading over to Seattle, Mackin said, “From the sound of Dave’s [Willard's] voice this afternoon, it’s pretty astounding—even a little overwhelming. I can’t wait to see it for myself.”

Willard told me that some of the donated gear and the hats would go to the Union Gospel Mission, some to Compass Housing, and some to the Downtown Emergency Service Center.

BHS Social Justice League

Although, the Seattle homeless are not direct beneficiaries of the work so far of  the Bainbridge High School’s Social Justice League, which is run by teacher Brad Lewis, SJL is just another example of Islanders reaching out to needy people beyond our borders with clothing. This Friday, January 19, SJL completed a two-week clothing drive that collected 80 bags of clothing from the community.

Knit Purl Give

Happy guys in new hats.

The clothing will benefit needy people around the county. The Arc of Kitsap offered to pay $3 per bag. A generous islander matched the first $200 raised and then routed his donation through the Gates Foundation where he works, turning it into $600. All the money raised is being donated to Partners In Health (http://www.pih.org), a national organization with a local chapter run by Lewis and Islander Laura Van Dyke. The mission of PIH is to bring health care to poor people around the globe, and the $1000 raised will go specifically toward fighting multiple-drug resistant tuberculosis in Lesotho. The local chapter of PIH, which recently hosted the screening of Girl Rising, is planning a mission to Haiti with high school students and a fundraising running event in the spring. The Social Justice League collected 10,000 pounds of food for Helpline House over the holidays.

Related Story:

Knit Purl Give—or How Bainbridge Is Knitted to the Seattle Homeless

Photos by Ty Evans and Andie Mackin.

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Last Word

Outgoing Council Members Hytopoulos, Lester, and Scales Get the Last Word

At Wednesday’s (December 11) City Council meeting, the Council celebrated the tenures of Councilmembers Kirsten Hytopoulos, Debbi Lester, and Bob Scales, all of which will end at the end of the year. Mayor Steven Bonnkowski gave brief introductions and speakers chosen by each Councilmember addressed the Council, reviewing the accomplishments of the outgoing public servants and making some pointed comments about the nature of public service. The three Councilmembers also offered their own remarks. The common thread through all of the remarks is that (a) being a City Councilmember is hard and you get criticized a lot, (b) the last four years have been especially tough because of the recession, and (c) the three outgoing Councilmembers were all hard workers with strong convictions and concern for the community.

State Senator Christine Rolfes

State Senator Christine Rolfes spoke about Hytopoulos. She recounted how Hytopoulos started off her career as a young parent on the south end who convinced her community to bring sewer service to that part of the island. Rolfes said she then “rallied the troops” to ensure that the proposed Lynwood Center development would meet the community’s needs. She helped lead the campaign to change our government from mayor run to the city manager form and then ran for Council.

Acknowledging the public criticism endured by Hytopoulos, Rolfes, a former Bainbridge City Councilmember, said, “One day you’re an informed engaged and generally well-respected citizen. And then you get elected to City Council. Your life changes.” She added, “You’re making decisions that impact people’s property, that impact their jobs, and that impact the safety of their children. There’s no way that everybody’s going to like your decisions, and a lot of times they don’t even like you.”

But, she added, “The most important thing when under fire is to stay true to your values,” and she said that Hytopoulos is an “amazing example.” She listed the challenges Hytopoulos faced, including the recession and the Winslow Way reconstruction project, and said “She gave us all hope that Bainbridge Island could remain an eclectic, progressive, interesting place to live.”

She also listed Hytopoulos’s accomplishments including the plastic bag ban, fighting for the liveaboard community, and rebuilding community trust in the Police Department, all the whole raising three kids and starting her own law practice. Rolfes said, “No one worked harder and contributed more,” and she encouraged Hytopoulos to consider another term once her kids are grown and the recession is over.

Rolfes concluded her remarks by admonishing the Councilmembers to “be kind to one another.”

Greg Robinson

Lester asked Bainbridge Island Museum of Art Director Greg Robinson, whom she has known for 20 years, to speak about her career. He started out by saying how “depressed” he was when Lester ran for Council and how “devastated” he was when she became mayor. He explained it was because it meant the local art scene would suffer from a reduced Lester presence, but he said, “The art world gets her back now.” He proceeded to tout her many contributions to the art scene, including her founding of Art Access, a long-running local magazine that tracks the Seattle-area art world.

Ryan Vancil

Lester’s husband, attorney Ryan Vancil, also spoke about Lester. He said that, because of Lester’s wide-ranging interests and involvement in so many different aspects of Island life, he realized he was the “only person who could speak to all of her work.” He listed some of her many accomplishments including reactivation of the nonmotorized transportation committee, the Winslow Way reconstruction and its incorporation of public art, the hiring of a new city manager, solar panels on City Hall, the housing development demonstration project, the Waypoint Park project, the city website improvement, the SMP, the tree ordinance, and the Waterfront Park Community Center upgrade.

He described how she served on numerous regional and county boards, introduced poetry to the Council meetings, kept the July 3d Street Dance from dying during the recession by resurrecting it as the Island Vibes celebration, planted tulips along Winslow Way, wrote hundreds of cards to thank people for doing their jobs, paid daily visits to the Waterfront Park Community Center during its reconstruction to talk to the workers and check on progress, and possibly issued more proclamations during her year as mayor any of her predecessors.

He concluded by saying that a “positive and encouraging demeanor were the hallmarks of her term” and that “every Councilmember deserves our respect whether we agree with them or not.” He then gave his wife a bouquet of flowers.

Joanne Tews

The Executive Director of Helpline House, Joanne Tews, spoke about Councilmember Bob Scales. She said, “You must know your values and be very comfortable with a very small fan club as a public servant.” She said, “I tell my staff, if everybody loves you, then you’re not doing your job. There is always a cost to sticking to your principles.”

Tews said that, during her 14 years as Executive Director, she had heard from many Councilmembers. Some had indicated relationship with Helpline that wasn’t there, some had promised things that never materialized, some had “misstated facts,” and  some had let peer pressure dissolve their resolve,” but, she said, never Scales.

She said that “every day we have to see clearly, listen carefully, and act wisely. Bob, I want to thank you for being green, for being comfortable with a small fan club, and for aligning your principles with your actions.”

The Councilmembers

The three outgoing Councilmembers got the last word—twice. First, they each were able to address the chambers and impart some final advice.

Hytopoulos said she hadn’t been prepared with comments. So she spoke extemporaneously, thanking her colleagues and saying, “We disagreed on a lot of things, but everyone has done so because we want the best for our community.” Then she expressed hope for the new Council and said, “We’ve got to try to see there’s truth in both ends of the spectrum” and hoped people would find common ground. However, she added, it’s “too easy to say everyone should just get along. Not everything can be compromised. There are things people shouldn’t compromise on.”

To the community she cautioned, “No matter what form of government, no matter who we elect, our community is not going to be able plug and play and walk away.” She told people to stay engaged.

Lester, who had prepared comments in advance, read a poem written by first grader Islander Julia Denlinger that was highlighted in the 2005 poetry banners produced by the Public Art Committee:

The Tree Story

The trees are the leaders of our island.
Stand up straight, reach out,
be kind and gentle, sway when
it’s windy. Give home for animals
or a place to eat, share your shade.
Be glittery as it rains. Be glittery
after it rains.

Lester said the poem is a “metaphor to “remind one to be a tall leader.” She said, “When we gather together, it is a sacred moment. Our friends, our neighbors, our children bear witness.” She added that “kindness, grace, generosity, and humor are wonderful gifts to share.”

She said her greatest lesson learned is that “it’s never an indvidual. It’s always a community.” She finished by saying, “We have done great things” and had her husband hand out gifts to the other Councilmembers, which included salmon she and her husband had caught and smoked and new Councilmember name plaques for the chambers.

Scales, who served for more than ten years with the Council, said that when he first ran in 2003, he ran unopposed and didn’t know what he was getting himself into. He mentioned that in those ten years he had worked with four different council configurations, and “it’s interesting to see how you’re perceived.” When he first served, he said, he was perceived as a property rights advocate. At the end of his last term he was called an “environmental advocate.” His conclusion was that “You are how you vote.”

Scales also acknowledged his fondness for “a good crisis.” His favorite time during the ten years was dealing with the financial crisis. He said, “It’s easier to operate as a council when there’s a crisis. You have unity of vision.”

He finished his remarks by saying, “I can guarantee I will not be back for a third term.”

The Councilmembers got the last word a second time when Mayor Steven Bonkowski, who had awarded each of them with a commemorative plaque and an orchid, read the three Councilmembers’ candidate statements from the 2008 voter pamphlet.

Hytopoulos had said that city spending and planning should reflect community priorities and that she would work for reasonable population increases. Lester wanted to reestablish council ward meetings, improve the city website, and increase opportunities for local food, arts, and business. And Scales had wanted to work for an improved decision-making process, conduct a thorough assessment of revenues and expenditures, and establish appropriate levels of service.

Bonkowski concluded, “We have three Councilmembers that have done an incredible job for four years of fulfilling what they said they were going to do.”

Photo by Simon James. 

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Play Winslow

Weekend on the Rock November 29-December 1, 2013:

Here are Inside Bainbridge recommendations for the weekend of November 29-December 1, 2013:

1. Indie Banditas Bazaar Christmas Show  
When: Friday and Saturday, 12-5 p.m.
Where: Grange Hall, 10340 Madison Ave NE.
Why: Organizers describe the event as “upcycled, recycled wares and new and inventive art,” handmade made by 20 artists, and reasonably priced. Plus food and live music. You can show the big box stores that you like to do it local, thank you very much.

2. Thanksgiving Weekend Wine Tour 
When: Friday-Sunday, 12-5 p.m.
Where: The seven Bainbridge wineries.
Why: Forget shopping. Work on the spirit instead—I mean the spirits. Get all the details here.

Celebrate Downtown Bainbridge3. Downtown Bainbridge Holiday Open House
When: Saturday, November 30, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Where: Winslow
Why: Celebrate shopping locally, get some great deals, and enjoy the festivities, including the Complimentary Hot Cider Booth (1-6 p.m. at the Mall), Complimentary Carriage Rides (1-3:30 from the Winslow Green), and the Community Tree Lighting (5:30 on Madrone Lane). Pick up a Passport from any participating retailer or at the Cider Booth. Collect a stamp when you spend $10 at a participating retailer. If you collect stamps from 10 businesses you will be entered to win one of four downtown shopping sprees worth $1,100 each. Plus, these authors will be at Eagle Harbor Books throughout the day: Kelli Russell Agodon, Carol Cassella, Jonathan Evison, David Guterson, Dylan Tomine, Garth Stein, Lance Weller, and Rebecca Wells. But wait: There’s more. Check out the event flier for more deals and events.

Micki Lippe art

Micki Lippe jewelry

4. Micki Lippe Trunk Show
When: Saturday, 12-7 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Island Museum of Art, 550 Winslow Way East.
Why: Metalsmith Micki Lippe will show off her jewelry. Take a gander, buy some gifts, and head into town for the rest of the Holiday Open House.

5. Afternoon on the Trails  
When: Saturday, 12-4 p.m.
Where: IslandWood, 4450 Blakely Ave NE.
Why: Work off the gravy on the 255 acres of IslandWood. Visitors can check out the treehouse, the suspension bridge, and the fern-covered ravine along the way. Bring a picnic.

Suggested $5 donation. No pets please.

Turkeystock6. Turkeystock: A Thanksgiving Tribute to the Tunes of the 1960s
When: Saturday, 7-10 p.m.
Where: Island Music Center, 10598 NE Valley Road
Why: Peter Spencer and his band, the Julie Duke Band, and Chele’s Kitchen raise money for Helpline House. Read more here.

$5.

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Turkey Trot 2013 Photo Gallery

This morning’s (November 28) Turkey Trot 1 Mile and 5K races started off Thanksgiving right for hundreds of Islanders and their visiting friends and family. The early 8:30 a.m. start to the 1 mile and the 9ish start for the 5K was no deterrent. Neither were the cold nor fog, and scores of participants’ cars were lined up along Arrow Point, after the lots at Battle Point Park were full.

Turkey Trot founders Ann Browning and Jenny Campbell launched the Turkey Trot about five years ago. Campbell said they approached Helpline House and asked them if they’d like to be beneficiaries of the money raised by the event. The people at Helpline House looked confused by the offer, she said. But they’re not confused anymore and certainly look forward to the annual input of money. Last year’s Trot raised $20,000, and this year’s has 20 percent more participants preregistered, 770, with an expected 300-400 registering today.

Timing professionals Kathy and Matt of Raise the Bar, a running team and timing business, were here from Maple Valley as has been the custom in years past to lend their expertise and expert instrumentation to the race. They posted the results within minutes of the finishes of each race. Kathy said they had to get up at about 4:30 this morning to get to Bainbridge on time.

The Bainbridge Island Police force was well represented in the run, with Chief Matt Hamner, Officers Victor Cienega and Erik Peffer, and Harbormaster Tami Allen all joining in the race. After the 5K, Peffer said that they’re going to get T-shirts for next year’s race with their new slogan: “At the BIPD we put put citizens first. That’s why we come in last.”

There was a big surprise in the 1 Mile this year. The third and fourth place finishers were women, and the third place winner was a twelve year old. The top four finishers of the 1 Mile were John Spannuth with a time of 5:44.2, Levi Perez, 12-year-old Claire Christen (at 6:28.3), and Barbi-Jo Smith. Craig Boekenoogen finished first overall in the 5K with a time of 16:41.6, followed by Orin Schumacher (16:54.1), and Jim Savage. The first two women to cross the line were Ramona Morshead (19:58.5) and Ruby Roberts (19:58.8).

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Ann Browning and Jenny Campbell, the founders of Turkey Trot

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Michael Rosenthal, the Turkey Trot MC and owner of event sponsor Island Fitness

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The 1 mile race begins

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1 Mile Winner John Spannuth followed by Levi Perez

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Barbi-Jo Smith, Fourth Place overall in the 1 Mile

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Harbormaster Tami Allen

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Officer Erik Peffer, Chief Matt Hamner, and Officer Victor Cienega of the BIPD

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Starting line for the 5K

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5K Winner Craig Boekenoogen

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First women to cross the line in the 5K, Ramona Morshead and Ruby Roberts

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Ann Browning and Jenny Campbell, the founders of Turkey TrotIMG_7447IMG_7452IMG_7460IMG_7453IMG_7459IMG_7466IMG_7468IMG_7472IMG_7480Michael Rosenthal, the Turkey Trot MC and owner of event sponsor Island FitnessIMG_7490The 1 mile race beginsIMG_7505IMG_75071 Mile Winner John Spannuth followed by Levi PerezBarbi-Jo Smith, Fourth Place overall in the 1 MileIMG_7540IMG_7544IMG_7547IMG_7556IMG_7558IMG_7562IMG_7568IMG_7581IMG_7572IMG_7579IMG_7582IMG_7587IMG_7591IMG_7589IMG_7592IMG_7595IMG_7603IMG_7605IMG_7613Harbormaster Tami AllenOfficer Erik Peffer, Chief Matt Hamner, and Officer Victor Cienega of the BIPDIMG_7621Starting line for the 5KIMG_7632IMG_7643IMG_7654IMG_7671IMG_76905K Winner Craig BoekenoogenIMG_7713First women to cross the line in the 5K, Ramona Morshead and Ruby RobertsIMG_7733IMG_7744IMG_7756IMG_7794IMG_7807IMG_7832IMG_7841IMG_7843IMG_7849IMG_7858IMG_7867IMG_7869IMG_7871IMG_7873IMG_7883

Photos by Sarah Lane.

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BIPD food drive

Cops Collect Truckloads of Food for Helpline’s Biggest Thanksgiving Demand Ever

Today, November 22, until 3 at Safeway and tomorrow between 9 and 3 at Town & Country, Bainbridge Island police officers are running a food drive for Helpline House, Bainbridge Island’s food bank. So far they’ve collected over 1,000 pounds of groceries.

At around 11:30, Police Chief Matt Hamner, Parking Officer Ken Lundgren, and Officer Erik Peffer, who was tasked with running the food drive, were standing just inside the entrance to Safeway, handing out pamphlets explaining what they’re doing and what kinds of donations they’re looking for and collecting items from shoppers on their way out. Peffer showed me one of the pre-made donation bags put together by Safeway staff to make donating the right kid of food items easy for shoppers. This bag included pasta sauce, tuna, peanut butter, and canned vegetables.

The Chief, impressed with Islanders’ generosity, excitedly told me that five or six people donated turkeys within the last hour. While I was there, a gentleman walked up to the officers, quietly handed them a 20-pound turkey, and left. Hamner’s wife and three of his kids showed up to help hand out pamphlets and load Lundgren’s parking enforcement truck with the groceries.

BIPD Food drive

Peffer and Hamner loading groceries

Peffer, who recently transferred here from the police force in San Juan County, New Mexico, said that he is used to doing community outreach, having run in the Olympic Torch run there with the department and participating in Shop with a Cop. That’s a winter holiday experience for kids of families in need. Money is donated and each kid is given $100 to $150 to go shopping—with an officer. The police officer makes sure the kid gets a pair of shoes and a good jacket, and the kid can buy a toy as well. Peffer said that event is happening here on December 7 at the Kitsap Mall, and he’ll be part of it.

Peffer, who has a degree in kinesiology, originally wanted to be a cardiologist, and was also interested in culinary arts, said that he remembers thinking, “When I’m on my death bed I want to feel that I did something good for my community.” That’s when he decided to go into police work. “Law enforcement is an honorable profession. It’s not all about car chases and arresting people. A lot of it is about community outreach.”

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Photos by Sarah Lane.

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Play Winslow

Weekend on the Rock November 15-17, 2013: Ranger’s Apprentice

Here are Inside Bainbridge recommendations for the weekend of November 15-17, 2013:

1. Stuff the Turkey  
When: Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Where: T&C and Safeway
Why: This is how our community provides food to our neighbors in need. During your grocery shopping, pick up a little extra and hand it over to our city’s officers who will be collecting items this weekend. Read more here.

2. Brown Bag Lunch: Hibernation
When: Friday, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Where: Hunny Hall/Bainbridge Island Senior Center, 370 Brien Ave. SE.
Why: Get smart while you eat, listening to experts talk about local wildlife, specifically about hibernation. The Brown Bag Lunch Series is presented by Bainbridge Island Land Trust and West Sound Wildlife Shelter. Bring your own lunch.

$3 suggested donation.

3. Composting Basics  
When: Friday, 1-2 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Library, 1270 Madison Ave. N
Why: It is so much easier to compost your leftovers than to pay for them to go to the landfill. Master composter John Barutt will show you how to do it. This program will be held in the library garden near the garden shed.

4. Movie Matinee: Monsters University
When: Friday, 3:30-5:15 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Library, 1270 Madison Ave. N
Why: Apparently it takes an advanced degree to scare children properly. Free film and popcorn.

5. Building a Sustainable Economy (BASE) Lecture Series  
When: Friday, 5:30-7 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Library, 1270 Madison Ave. N
Why: Michael Kanter, the Chief Visionary Officer at Cambridge Naturals, will talk about the concept of Legitimate Local.

Admission is free, but space is limited. Please register at bi-local.eventbrite.comThe series is brought to you by Bainbridge Island Chamber of Commerce, Bainbridge Graduate Institute, Sustainable Bainbridge, and the Bainbridge Public Library.

6. Book Talk with John Flanagan  
When: Friday, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Where: Sons of Norway Hall, 18891 Front St., Poulsbo
Why: This event co-hosted by Eagle Harbor Books brings John Flanagan, best-selling author of the Ranger’s Apprentice series, to our Kingdom and specifically to Poulsbo, which, come to think of it, is a lot like Skandia. No worries—Morgarath was not invited.

7. About Boating Safely  
When: Saturday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Where: Waterfront Community Center, 370 Brien Drive SE
Why: Remember that ferry-sailboat incident a few weeks ago in the San Juans? Well, this 8-hour course taught by members of the USCG Auxiliary will show you how to stay safe (unless, of course, there’s a giant ferry bearing down). Successful completion qualifies you for a Washington State Boater Education Card, great for impressing people at parties.

$35 per person or $50 per family. Please pre-register with Grant Winther at (206) 842-5862 or gawsail@sounddsl.com.

8. Radical Home Ec: High-Tech Holiday Cards  
When: Saturday, 11-12 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Library, 1270 Madison Ave. N
Why: I thought a high-tech holiday card was an e-mail with red and green fonts. But no! It’s a light-up LED card. You can find out how to make one and what LED stands for.

9. Mushroom Mania: The Fungi of Our Forest
When: Sunday, 1-3:30 p.m.
Where: IslandWood, 4450 Blakely Ave NE
Why: This has been one wacky mushroom fall. Think how cool you could have been harvesting fungi if you had only known what you were doing. The Kitsap Peninsula Mycological Society runs the class for all ages.

Ages 4+ $5/person. 3 and under free. Sign up in advance. Contact Christina Doherty at (206) 855-4384 or christinad@islandwood.org.

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Community Gets Creative to Stuff Helpline’s Turkey (so to Speak)

Helpline House, the Bainbridge food bank, provides food to Island residents in need. Last year, 275 families were served during Thanksgiving week, and the food and funds donated during November fed the foodbank for several months more. This month, in anticipation of Thanksgiving, Helpline is running what it’s calling the Stuff the Turkey project, a month-long series of fund- and food-raising events.

Food Drives

  • 11/21: BHS Key Club
  • 11/23: Boy Scout Troop #1496 and Cub Scout Troop #4496
  • 11/22: Bainbridge Island Police Department at Safeway
  • 11/22-23: Bainbridge Island Police Department at T&C

In addition, the BIPD has a food donation box at the station. Numerous schools, including Ordway and The Island School, will be collecting donations and delivering them to the food bank.

Turkey Trot logoTurkey Trot

Thanksgiving morning, as a pre-Thanksgiving dinner workout, runners and wakers of all ages will join in this 5K and 1-mile running event at Battle Point Park to raise funds for Helpline. The first three years of this event raised more than $42,000. Register today, November 14, to enter a raffle for prizes including Indigo Plum gift certificates and running shoes from Poulsbo Running. Participants in costume get a prize. Register here.

TurkeystockTurkeystock: A Thanksgiving Tribute to the Tunes of the 1960s

This music fest, featuring three local bands, will play music of the 60s at the Island Music Center November 30 to raise funds for Helpline. At 7 p.m., Chele’s Kitchen  takes the stage, followed by The Julie Duke Band at 8 and headliner The Peter Spencer Experience at 9.

All profits go to Helpline. Admission is $15 for adults and $7 for children. For more details about Turkeystock, call (206) 842-9916, e-mail markh@howlinwolf.com, or visit www.howlinwolf.com/hwp/turkey. The Island Music Center is located at 10598 NE Valley Road.

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Helpline House Sees Biggest Use in Its History but Donations Are Down

Photo by Peter Smith.

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Generous Islanders Get a Little Back at Bainbridge Community Foundation Awards

The Bainbridge Community Foundation celebrated its 5th annual philanthropy recognition awards on September 14, honoring three people and one organization that have given way more than their share to the Island, and, in the words of BCF, “enhancing the quality of life in the Bainbridge community by their acts of generosity.” At the IslandWood-hosted ceremony, Larry Nakata and Kate Webster were honored as outstanding Bainbridge philanthropists for 2013. Eighteen-year-old Sarah Berchinski was recognized as outstanding young philanthropist of the year. And Hill Moving services was named outstanding philanthropic company.

Larry Nakata

Larry NakataLarry Nakata’s father was a co-founder of Town & Country Market. Nakata started out in the family business as a bottle boy at age 13 and now serves as chairman of the five-store company. He credited his parents with influencing his attitudes toward giving, and he recognized philanthropy as part of the Bainbridge culture: “Bainbridge Island has a huge history in this kind of work. . . . taking care of neighbors in our community.”

The first organization Nakata supported was Helpline House. Along the way, there have been many others, including the Harmony Hill Retreat Center located on Hood Canal, which offers free support for those affected by a cancer diagnosis. In 2010, with co-honoree Webster, Nakata served as honorary co-chair of BCF’s Invest in Bainbridge Initiative, a multi-year program dedicated to raising funds to support community grant making.

At IslandWood, Town & Country Market CEO Bill Weymer accepted the award on behalf of Nakata, who was not present.

Kate Webster

Kate WebsterKate Webster’s philanthropic history extends back 50 years and has centered primarily around education, helping children, and building community. Over the years she has served as board president of Seattle Children’s Hospital and been a mentor for many nonprofit leaders on the Island. She served on the board of trustees of the Bloedel Reserve and helped open it to the public. She established a fund in memory of her late husband to support at-risk youth.

When she was growing up, her parents, both Manhattan-based doctors, would spend Saturdays volunteering at local hospitals. Webster said that her father told her that ”giving back was just what you do to show your appreciation for those who have helped you in the past and to help others in the future. I trusted that, because my father was usually right.”

Sarah Berchinski

Sarah BerchinskiAs a Hyla middle-school student, Sarah Berchinski began helping out at Helpline House one day a week. She continued working there over the summer and organized a team of student volunteers. Since then, she has also worked at a Seattle shelter for abused women and at Soccer Without Borders, which provides soccer gear and uses the sport as an instrument for change in communities around the world. And she has traveled to Africa to record data for the World Health Organization and to work on a gender equality project.

As a junior in high school, Berchinski came up with the idea of making and selling birdhouses to raise money for houses for people. Her first birdhouse effort funded the construction of the playground at Ferncliff Village, the Housing Resource’s Board affordable housing development. Since that original fundraiser, the Birdhouse Project has grown into a signature event for HRB and has raised more than $30,000 to date.

Berchinski said, “I first went to HRB to ask them if they would consider putting a student on their board. They said ‘no,’ so I went home and brainstormed with my friends about what else we could do for the organization.”

In keeping with the ongoing theme among honorees, she credited a parental figure for influencing her: “My mother is my role model. She is always giving to other people and organizations.” Her mother, Deb DeVlieger, has a job that takes her around the world, and Berchinski has been fortunate to accompany her on many of her travels.

She is a freshman at Scripps College in Claremont, California, where she plans to study politics and human relations so she can be a human rights attorney and work for the United Nations. Because of her studies, she was unable to attend the ceremony. DeVlieger accepted the award for her.

Hill Moving Services

Hill Moving ServicesSteve and Debbie Hill and their son and daughter Mike and Kay established their moving company on Bainbridge in 1986. They continue to run it as a team, along with 13-year-old granddaughters Emma and Sarah. They started with two trucks and a storage area near Winslow, moving to Poulsbo in the 1990s as business expanded.

The company supports many island groups, including Bainbridge Youth Services, Boys and Girls Club, KiDiMu, and Bainbridge Island Senior Community Center. They have donated truckloads of unclaimed furnishings to the annual Bainbridge Rotary Auction and provided moving services for several island nonprofits. They also offer financial support to community-wide island activities, such as the Fourth of July celebration. The company transports food from Food Lifeline in Auburn to Kitsap food banks on a weekly basis. They have also donated trucks to food banks and other nonprofits in the area.

Debbie said, “We believe that a business cannot be successful unless it is involved in the community.” Mike said they do not have a formal giving strategy but see the need and “jump in.”

BCF’s goals are to provide financial support to Bainbridge Island nonprofit organizations and to encourage local philanthropy. Find out more at http://www.bainbridgecommunityfoundation.org/.

Featured photo by Howard Lake.

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Volunteer

Aging Well: Why Volunteering Is Good for You

by Jeannette Franks, PhD Gerontologist

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Don’t you hate it when someone says something is good for you? Especially if they are right? Well, I do.

However, there is very good evidence that people who volunteer live longer and have fewer illnesses. Purpose or meaning in life predicts greater satisfaction and quality of life, as well as lower morbidity and mortality.

My philosophy is that volunteering begins early—grade school at least. Scouts, service groups, schools, faith-based communities, and so on all provide excellent volunteer opportunities for people of all ages.

For older people, one option is serving on a board of directors for a nonprofit organization. This can be an excellent way to share your wisdom and experience. I make sure that I have at least one board commitment at all times. Currently I am proud to serve on the Bainbridge Island Senior Community Center (BISCC) Board of Directors.

We can boast that we have some of the liveliest, most diverse, and interesting programs of just about any senior center in the state. Plus we recently created a “warming station” for people of all ages to go when the power goes out in Winslow (again). The “senior” center is targeted at 50+, so you needn’t even really be a senior. Join now before annual membership dues go up from $10 to $12 per person in 2014!

Volunteer Opportunities on Bainbridge

  • The Senior Center has numerous volunteer opportunities. Currently the most urgent need is a landscaping team that will take care of the garden on a regular basis. They also would like volunteers to help with “greening” the Center to reduce its eco-footprint and establish it as a thoughtful member of our broader community.
  • The Zero Waste Initiative, a branch of Sustainable Bainbridge, led by the brilliant Diane Landry, is advising the Center on sustainability. Zero Waste has excellent volunteer opportunities at special events, such as the Bluegrass Festival. You get useful training and you get in free!
  • In fact, Sustainable Bainbridge hosts 14 different organizations, all of which work with volunteers. Check out my favorite—Weed Warriors! Our next event is Friday, September 13, from 1 to 3 p.m. at Waterfront Park (coincidentally across from the Senior Center).
  • Of course One Call for All also offers numerous volunteer possibilities in a myriad of Island organizations, including PAWS, Helpline House, The Boys and Girls Club, West Sound Wildlife Shelter, the Bainbridge Schools Foundation, Arms Around Bainbridge, and the Bainbridge Public Library, to name just a few.

Maximize your health and longevity with volunteering; you’ll feel better for doing so!

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Photo courtesy of Ron Mader.

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Play Winslow

Weekend on the Rock 8/23-25/2013: Short Plays, Long Arms

Here are Inside Bainbridge recommendations for the weekend of August 23-25, 2013:

1. Project Backpack Weekend Push
When: Friday through Sunday
Where: Helpline House, Paper Products Etc., Wildernest, Windermere, Modern Collision, Island Fitness, and online at BainbridgeBookbag.com
Why: This weekend is a special push to raise funds and supplies for Helpline House’s Project Backpack. Helpline says they especially need Composition Books (college ruled), Pencil Pouches, Colored Pencils, Fine Tip Markers, Glue Sticks, Kleenex, and Graph Paper (5×5). You can donate money to Project Backpack at Helpline, Wildernest, Windermere, Modern Collision, and Island Fitness. You can purchase school supplies for the project at BainbridgeBookbag.com and at Paper Products Etc. Paper Products is taking 20 percent off all items donated to Project Backpack between now and Monday. You can also sponsor a backpack there for between $25 and $50.

2. End of Summer Reading Popsicle Party
When: Friday, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Library, 1270 Madison Ave. N
Why: Popsicles! Plus, there will be prizes. And somehow the popsicles and prizes encourage kids to read. Win, win, win for all ages.

Island Cup3. Third Annual Island Cup Soccer Tournament
When: Friday, 2 p.m., through Sunday afternoon
Where: Battle Point fields and soccer fields around the island
Why: You like fútbol? Sí? So do lots of people who will be in town this weekend for the tournament. Check out the matches at the soccer field closest to you. Find the schedule and field locations for boys here and for girls here.

 

4. The Salon: A Forum for Conversation  
When: Friday, 1-2:30 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Library, 1270 Madison Ave. N
Why: This month’s topic is democratic government. You can weigh in on whether this ship has sailed or the experiment is just getting going. The talking is free.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid5. Summer Movie Matinee: Wimp-a-Thon
When: Friday, 3:30-8:30 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Library, 1270 Madison Ave. N
Why: Apparently, wimp movies actually qualify for a genre of their own. Watch back-to-back showings of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Roderick Rules, and Dog Days. There will be safety in numbers.

6. Movies in the Park: Babe
When: Friday, 8:30-11 p.m.
Where: Waterfront Park, 402 Brien Drive SE.
Why: The Parks District is showing Babe, which is not about a portly baseball player but about a really smart pig who wants to herd sheep. Roll out your blanket on the lawn and revel in the adorableness.

Arms Around Bainbridge 7th Annual Swim Relay

 

7. Arms Around Bainbridge 7th Annual Fundraiser
When: Saturday, all day
Where: Blakely Harbor, Treehouse Cafe, Point White Dock, BI Cycle.
Why: The swimmers will start and end in the harbor and swim clockwise. The bikers will start at Treehouse at 8:30 a.m., head to Point White Dock to cheer on the swimmers, and finish up at BI Cycle. Walkers and runners will head out from Treehouse at 8:45 a.m. Read more here.

Ishizumi fan8. Japanese Fan Making Workshop
When: Saturday, 2-4:30 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Library, 1270 Madison Ave. N
Why: This is not about increasing your social media caché. It’s about making a heat-thwarting tool. Kanji and Naomi Ishizumi, who are 6th-generation fan makers, will show you how.

Preregistration is required. Call (842-4162) or stop by the library. There’s a $20 materials fee. For more information, visit www.ishizumifan.com.

Bloedel Picnic

 

9. 25th Anniversary Bloedel Summer Picnic
When: Saturday, 5:30-9 p.m.
Where: Bloedel, 7571 NE Dolphin Drive
Why: Usually, you’re not supposed to take food to Bloedel. But in honor of their 25th anniversary, the Bloedel folks are letting their hair down and going wild by letting you bring your own picnic, play lawn games, and eat ice cream on the grounds. They’ll provide the music: the completely 100% awesome Nick Stahl Quartet and Roger Ferguson and friends. Read more here.

Tickets for members and children 13 and younger are $6. Nonmembers pay $9. Tickets are available here.

Winslow Way Website Photo10. Lives & Lies of the Oldtimers
When: Saturday, 6:30-10 p.m.
Where: Winslow Green
Why: Food, music, and history: the perfect combo at this Bainbridge Island History Museum fundraiser. Read more here.

Tickets are $75. Call (206) 842-2773  or pay via PayPal here.

Island Theatre 2013 Ten-Minute Play Festival Poster

11. Island Theatre Ten-Minute Play Festival
When: Saturday and Sunday, 7:30 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Performing Arts, 200 Madison Ave. N.
Why: Check out the region’s best playwrights with short attention spans. The two first and second-place plays will be performed both Saturday and Sunday. The rest of the winners will be divided p, six and six, between the two nights. Read more here.

12. Sensory Sunday
When: Sunday, 10-11:30 a.m.
Where: Kids Discovery Museum, 301 Ravine Lane NE
Why: The tradition continues. Once a month, KiDiMu brings in therapists, offers additional accommodations, and sets the mood for kids with sensory challenges. Read more here.

Please register at (206) 855-4650 as space is limited. The cost is $3 for nonmembers and $2 for members.

Michael PaternitiThe Telling Room13. Michael Paterniti at Eagle Harbor Book Co.
When: Sunday, 3 p.m.
Where: Eagle Harbor Book Co. Used Book Annex, 157 Winslow Way East
Why: Michael Paterniti, the author of The Telling Room: A Story of Love, Betrayal, Revenge and the World’s Greatest Piece of Cheese, is making only one stop in the Seattle area: Here. He will discuss his new book with our local Seattle Symphony bassist Jonathan Green. The event comes with local cheese and drinks.

The event is ticketed, with limited seating. Every customer who buys the book at EHBC before the event will have seats reserved. Others can RSVP by phone or on the bookstore’s website and will be seated after book buyers.

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Tiffny Weighall

If You Enjoy Shopping for Back to School Supplies, Don’t Read This

Tiffny Weighall gets what it’s like to shop for school supplies in the fall. As a mom of three young people and as a former employee of a paper goods store, she understands about having to go to three different stores to find the best price on the right kind of protractor, for example, and sift through piles of already sifted through notebooks to find the one that is the right color and has the right kind of lines and margins.

With that understanding in mind, she just launched a seasonal business to help other parents sail through back-to-school readiness. Bainbridge Book Bag is a concierge service of sorts that requires you merely to visit the website, select your kid’s school and teacher, make a few online selections about color and other choices, and hit pay. Then Tiffny takes over and puts your bag of supplies together and delivers it to your door. That’s it. You’re done.

The website offers an additional bonus. You can also make a donation through her site to Project Backpack, supporting the efforts of Helpline House to gear up local kids in need.

Weighall, who spent a young person’s lifetime working for nonprofits, feels very strongly about this last point. After working and/or volunteering for the Gates Foundation, the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival, the Special Olympics, the Red Cross, the Interfaith Council, and United Way, she wanted to make sure her business gave Helpline House and Project Backpack the biggest percentage possible of people’s donations. That means that on Project Backpack donations she receives absolutely no profit, which, she wanted to point out, is not the case with some other local businesses.

So what’s the catch? I asked her if she charges more for her products. To the contrary, she said, she charges only 50 to 75 percent of what her competitors charge. I asked her how that was possible, and she said she has no overhead since she works out of her home and has no employees. And because the business is seasonal, she has the luxury to shop around and find the very best price on each item. Sometimes that means getting it wholesale and sometimes it just means waiting for the right sale to come along.

I asked her how a person with a background in nonprofit work seemed to know so much about running a business, and she said nonprofits are run very much like businesses, with efficiency being of prime concern. The only difference is who the ultimate customer is.

Weighall acknowledged that many brick and mortar stores have to contend with very high rents. She said Winslow Way is notorious for that. She said she thought it was landlords who were running businesses into the ground, not people shopping off island. But she also acknowledged that taxes are very high on property here.

When it comes down to it, for Weighall, service is what it’s all about and what will keep people shopping locally. “I want it to feel like a neighbor’s bringing you a good deal,” she said.

Visit Weighall’s website at www.bainbridgebookbag.com. You can make a donation to Project Backpack through her site here.

Photo by Sarah Lane.

 

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Helpline House

Give Big to Helpline in August Through Farmer’s Market and Pack 547

Bainbridge Island Cub Scout Pack 547 and the Farmer’s Market have teamed up to benefit Helpline House, our Island’s food bank. On all five Saturdays in August, the scouts will be running a donation drop-off table at the market. For each donation you make, you can earn a Market Buck, which is a $1 off coupon valid with any market vendor.

Tim O’Brien, the Manager of the Bainbridge Island Farmer’s Market, said that Helpline is looking for protein-rich, shelf-stable foods, like peanut butter, beans, canned meats, and soups, or cash donations. No perishable items will be accepted (there’s no cold storage access available over the weekend).

Frank Kochenash, a Scout Parent Leader, said, “We approached the Farmers’ Market about our annual service project and they welcomed us with open arms. Our scouts will be spreading the word throughout the island in August to generate as much awareness and excitement for the food drive.”

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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Chicken stare down

Chicken Curious or Crazed? Take the 2013 Tour de Coop

Warning: Beware of chicken fanatics. They run afowl these days.

Duly Warned: The Fifth annual Bainbridge Island Tour de Coop is Saturday, July 20, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets for this self-guided tour of Bainbridge coops will be on sale starting July 13 at Bay Hay & Feed and Dana’s Showhouse. Tickest for bicycle purists are $8, car tickets are $10, and 4-person or more carpoools are $30. All proceeds from this popular event benefit Helpline House.

Curious?
Learn from chicken coop kook keepers. They will display their egg-headed madness and share their clucking highs and lows, enabling you to make a sound judgment in the peace of your own hen-free-Zen home.

Crazed?
Learn chick tricks from your coop kook cohort. They will display their egg-headed madness and share their clucking highs and lows.

Whatever your predileggtion or even re(c)luctance, the Tour de Coop is, at least, a chance to just go have fun seeing Bainbridge Island chicken runs and the “quacks” who tend them.

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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Bainbridge Community Foundation

Bainbridge Community Foundation Announces 46 Grant Recipients

Last night, June 27, at Bainbridge Performing Arts, the Bainbridge Community Foundation announced grant awards for 46 local nonprofits. The grants total $146,000. They range in focus from a milk fund to a summer singing series.

In this ninth cycle of BCF funding, local nonprofits submitted funding requests that were then evaluated by a grants committee made up of members of BCF’s board and the community. The grant requests fell into a variety of categories including health and human services, environment, arts and culture, education, animal welfare, and recreation.

Individual grant amounts ranged from $750 to $6,825. Twenty-three of the proposals were fully funded. During the last 12 years, BCF has given more than 900 grants totaling just under $4 million to local causes.

Here is a look at some of this year’s recipients:

Sensory program to serve children/families with autism: On the fourth Sunday of each month the Kids Discovery Museum will be open solely to children and families with autism, from 10 to 11:30 a.m., to allow them to explore the exhibits in a quieter environment, with assistance from applied behavior analysis specialists. In addition, four times a year a “Kids Night at the Museum” will be geared for autistic children, giving parents a needed break knowing that their child is in trained hands.

Free legal assistance: Kitsap Legal Services will use the BCF funding to continue operating the monthly Bainbridge Island Advice Clinic at Helpline House, which provides assistance to vulnerable and low-income residents in areas of civil law, including housing, family, bankruptcy, consumer, employment, and wills.

Robotics Grant

Bainbridge student Josie Hill demonstrates to the school board at its June 13 meeting how she can program a robot to follow a path on the floor. A grant from the Bainbridge Community Foundation will help fund an expansion of the robotics program currently in place in the middle grades to the elementary schools.

Robotics education in Bainbridge elementary schools: The Bainbridge Schools Foundation will introduce a STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) robotics program at the elementary school level this fall to stoke children’s interest in math and science at an early age. The BCF grant will help fund the first phase of the program: summer training for a pilot teacher from each grade at each of the four elementary schools and robotics kits for their classrooms. Throughout the year, students in the pilot classes will design and build machines to make the connection between what they are learning and how to solve real-world problems.

Visually impaired persons room at the library: The Bainbridge Public Library will be able to renovate and upgrade the small downstairs room that is used by members of the visually impaired persons group and other library patrons whose vision is impaired. After 15 years, the room looks like a storage place for outdated stuff, and the environment is no longer inviting or even safe.

Student Conservation Corps (SCoCo) removing invasive plant species on conservation lands: This Bainbridge Island Land Trust (BILT) grant will pay for ScoCo directors to oversee students (aged 15 to 18) throughout a four-week summer program and support an additional week of student work on BILT conserved properties. The ongoing SCoCo program not only enhances the overall health of the natural areas of the Island, but it also educates a new generation of conservationists.

Spay and neuter program: The Kitsap Humane Society operates a spay and neuter program to control pet overpopulation in Kitsap County and assists low-income families by offering special pricing for the surgery. Additionally, in partnership with PAWS of Bainbridge Island, the Humane Society will establish a new program called “Project Connect” that will center around providing to the underprivileged and homeless free of charge pet spay/neuter services and also transportation to the shelter for the procedure.

Trustee Awards

Each year special Trustee Awards are given to proposals that promote partnership or collaboration among community organizations. These special recognition awards are separately funded by BCF trustees, staff, and grants committee members. This year there were three winners:

  • Bainbridge Youth Services for an innovative program to connect teens and parents with free, confidential mental health counseling through social media. Teens’ access to help will be provided through both texting and web-based educational tools designed and implemented by technologically savvy professionals on Rotary’s Healthy Youth Committee.
  • Bainbridge Schools Foundation to fund the planning of a large art installation by children in collaboration with the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art and KiDiMu
  • Bainbridge Island Child Care Centers (BICCC) to support a collaborative staff training program for the Boys and Girls Club of Bainbridge Island and BICCC, the two largest after-school programs on the Island.

Here is a list of all the grant recipients:

  • Animal Welfare Grants
    • Kitsap Humane Society
    • PAWS of Bainbridge Island and North Kitsap
    • West Sound Wildlife Shelter
  • Arts and Culture Grants
    • Bainbridge Chorale
    • Bainbridge Island Arts & Humanities Council
    • Bainbridge Island Historical Museum
    • Bainbridge Island Museum of Art
    • Bainbridge Island Youth Orchestra
    • Bainbridge Performing Arts
    • Island Theatre
    • Kids Discovery Museum
    • Kitsap Children’s Musical Theater
  • Education Grants
    • Bainbridge Graduate Institute
    • Bainbridge Public Library (2)
    • Bainbridge Schools Foundation (2)
    • Battle Point Astronomical Association
    • Kitsap Adult Center for Education
  • Environment Grants
    • Bainbridge Island Land Trust
    • Bainbridge Island Parks & Rec-Outdoor Programs
    • Bloedel Reserve
    • IslandWood
    • Salish Sea Expeditions
  • Health and Human Services Grants
    • Bainbridge Island Child Care Centers (2)
    • Bainbridge Island Special Needs Foundation
    • Bainbridge Youth Services
    • Boys & Girls Clubs of King County
    • Dispute Resolution Center of Kitsap County
    • Helpline House
    • Hope in Christ Ministries/The Coffee Oasis
    • Hospice of Kitsap County
    • Housing Resources Board
    • Interfaith Volunteer Caregivers
    • Island Time Activities
    • Kitsap Legal Services
    • Kitsap Sexual Assault Center
    • Martha & Mary
    • North Kitsap Fishline
    • One Call for All
    • Peacock Family Center
    • Sound Works Job Center
    • Washington State Smile Partners
    • West South Youth for Christ
    • YWCA of Kitsap County
  • Recreation Grants
    • Bainbridge Island Rowing
    • C.A.S.T. Foundation
    • Friends of Bainbridge Island High School Sailing

 Photo courtesy of Bainbridge Schools Foundation.

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Sheldon schwartz

Best of Bainbridge 2013: Your Local Faves

You voted (and voted) for your favorite Bainbridge Island businesses, people, and places. And now the Inside Bainbridge Best of the Island ibbi awards for 2013 have been tabulated (painfully laboriously by hunched and bleary-eyed editors using free and therefore prehistorically unsophisticated software).

Many of your answers consisted of quaint explanations, like “that cute one with the prayer wheel” or “the one across the street from T&C” or “across from the liquor store,” which explains in part why the counting took so long. Some were commentary, as in “C’mon, really?” or “Lindsleys—we’re so sad to see you go” or “I won’t say” or “My least favorite is. . . .”

Like last year, many of you feel the best breakfast (or lunch or dinner or coffee) place is your own home. And, like last year, most of you revealed that you have no idea how to spell your doctors’ names.

Out of thousands of votes cast in 60 categories, we ended up with three ties and several neck-and-neck races. For example, the Best Neighborhood category pitted Rolling Bay against Winslow, with Winslow winning by a single vote. In the Best Preschool category, St. Cecilia’s edged out Montessori Country School also by a single vote. And Wildernest beat out Eagle Harbor Book Company for Best Retailer by, yes, just one vote.

So, here are your Bainbridge Island favorites. (Cue drum roll.)

Best Café: Blackbird

Best Breakfast Joint: Streamliner Diner

Best Lunch Place: Fork & Spoon

Best Fancy Dinner Restaurant: The Four Swallows Restaurant

Best Casual Dinner Restaurant: Harbour Public House (The Pub)

Best Dessert Spot: Mora’s Iced Creamery

Best Pizza: Treehouse Cafe

Best Burger: Harbour Public House (The Pub)

Best French Fries: Harbour Public House (The Pub)

Best Takeout: Sawatdy Thai Cuisine

Best Bar: Harbour Public House (The Pub)

Best Winery: Eleven Winery

Best Music Venue: Treehouse Cafe

Best Hotel/Inn/B&B: Eagle Harbor Inn

ibbisBest Place to Work Out: Island Fitness

Best Pharmacy: TIE between Rite Aid and Safeway

Best Grocery Store/Food Mart: Town & Country Market

Best Plumber: Bainbridge Island Plumbing

Best Electrician: Bainbridge Island Electric

Best Mechanic: Island Center Auto

Best Contractor: TIE between The Reijnen Company and Fairbank Construction Company

Best Carpenter: TIE between David Finch and John Steiner

Best Doctor: Judy Rayl, MD

Best Dentist: Sally Hewett, DDS

Best Chiropractor: Julie Rosenblatt, DC

Best Physical Therapist: Keith Heinzelman, DPT

Best Massage Therapist: Heather McWilliams, PT

Best Yoga Instructor: Jen Breen

Best Veterinarian: Thomas Penn, DVM

Best Lawyer: Bruce Weiland

Best Architect: Matthew Coates

Best Accountant: Carrie Williams, CPA

Best Realtor: Bill Hunt

Best Financial Advisor: Darren Gray

Best Dog Trainer: Judith Bell, BeauJes Dog Training

Best Photographer: Nick Felkey

Best Beauty Salon: Firefly Salon

Best Art Gallery: The Gallery (Bainbridge Arts and Crafts)

Best Retailer: Wildernest

Best Place to Buy Clothing: Zia

Best Place to Buy a Gift: Danger

Best Pet Supplies Store: Paws and Fins Pet Shop

Best Garden Center: Bainbridge Gardens

Best Gas Station: Chevron

Best Gardener/Landscaper: Bart Berg Landscape

Best Picnic Spot: Fay Bainbridge Park

Best Place for a Date: The Four Swallows Restaurant

Best View: Fay Bainbridge Park

Best Park: Battle Point Park

Best Beach: Fay Bainbridge Park

Best Trail: The Grand Forest

Best Neighborhood: Winslow

Best Place for Kids: Battle Point Park

Best Place to Take Visitors: The Bloedel Reserve

Best Nonprofit Organization: Helpline House

Best Teacher: Amy Lee-Despard (at St. Cecilia)

Best Public School: Bainbridge High School

Best Private School: St. Cecilia Catholic School

Best Preschool: St. Cecilia Catholic School

Best Place of Worship/Prayer: St. Cecilia Parish

 

Related Story:

 

Photo by Sheldon Schwartz.

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Helpline House

Helpline House Sees Biggest Use in Its History but Donations Are Down

Helpline House, provider of our local food bank and social services, has issued its 2012 report, showing that Bainbridge Island needs the organization more than ever. The 12,143 households served by the organization last year represent the biggest use in the organization’s history. Also last year, there were about 300 more weekly visits to the Food Bank than in 2011.

But the report also shows that Helpline needs Bainbridge citizens’ help more than ever. In 2012, the organization’s expenses exceeded income by about $85,000. At the same time, donations were down by 18 percent.

Food Bank

Helpline HouseHelpline calculates that the Food Bank provided 750,000 pounds of products to about 800 families throughout the year, representing a 9 percent increase in Food Bank visitors. This sounds like a lot of food, and it is. But at the same time, the number of participating families increased by 9 percent, food prices in the Seattle area increased by 1.5 percent overall and even more for milk and meat, donations decreased even as clients started taking the maximum amount of food allowed, and certain inexpensive food sources dried up. Managing the $15,000 Food Bank shortfall required the Board to approve an unexpected additional outlay of funds. More bad news is that the federal government anticipates that food prices will rise another 3 to 4 percent in 2013.

The good news is that sources of fresh produce for the Food Bank increased by 30 percent due to volunteer garden efforts and community outreach, produce provided by CSAs, and partnerships with Northwest Harvest, Food Lifeline, and a local organic farmer.

Other Services

Helpline HouseIn 2012, 21 people received contracted counseling services. Fifty clients per month participated in the medical equipment lending program. Fifty local families were given energy assistance appointments with Kitsap Community Resources, providing them the opportunity to receive assistance with paying energy bills. Because of staffing changes, counselors actually saw fewer social service clients than they had the year before.

Helpline helped families with children through additional services such as Park District vouchers and youth activity scholarships. Seniors were provided with counseling services that helped them find more affordable and comprehensive health insurance. The Skills Plus Program served people seeking employment, and the Clothing Works Program focused on the needs of people with special needs.

Need for Support

December of 2012 was a good example of what kind of support our community is capable of. Helpline received $144,000 in private donations in that one month, a record and a 28 percent increase over the previous December. The Turkey Trot alone brought in $20,000. The record numbers seem fitting for the year that saw the late December passing of Helpline’s founding Director, Joan Holcomb, who helped launch the nonprofit in 1973 and worked there for 30 years.

Throughout the year, more than 100 volunteers put in a total of 20,000 hours. Sixty students also offered their help  including 20 Summer of Service participants.

Do you want to help? The Letter Carrier’s food drive happens May 11. You can also visit Helpline’s website and make a donation there, mail in a check, or drop off a donation at 282 Knechtel Way. To read the full 2012 report click here.

Photos by Sarah Lane and courtesy of Helpline House.

 

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Island Storage Providers Battle It out for Helpline

Two local storage unit providers, Bainbridge Storage and Reliable Storage, are facing off in a two-week competition to see which of them can collect the most nonperishable items for Helpline House’s food bank. The event runs from 9 a.m. on February 23 until 5 p.m. on March 2.

Isabelle Cobb, the Assistant Manager at Bainbridge Storage, threw down the gauntlet to Curt Bonderant, Manager of Reliable Storage. J. M. Danielson, Manager of Bainbridge Storage, said that each facility is responsible for getting out the word about the challenge, and he adds that “Bainbridge Storage definitely has some tricks up their sleeve.”

Food DriveInterested in participating? Drop off your nonperishable goods at either location. Bainbridge Storage is located at 9300 Sportsman Club Road NE. Reliable Storage is located at 9551 NE New Brooklyn Road.

Presumably neither of the competitors will have trouble finding a place to store the gathered food items.

 

 

 

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Play Winslow

Weekend on the Rock: January 25-27, 2013

Here are Inside Bainbridge recommendations for the weekend of January 25-27, 2013:

BTW, you may be missing two events this weekend, and there’s nothing you can do about it. One Starry Night, BPA’s gala fundraiser at Wing Point, including “auction karaoke” and featuring a tour of Jay Leno’s garage (imagine the recycling bins, oil stains, and tool pegboard!) as an auction item, is sold out. So is The Cave Singers’ gig at Treehouse. If you didn’t get your tickets for that one, here’s what you’re missing:

1. Family Movie Matinee: Brave
BraveWhen: Friday, 3:30-5:15 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Public Library
Why: This is one of those movies you actually can enjoy with your kids. Plus, Pixar gives women their chance to star. Popcorn too.

2. BHS Basketball and Canned Food Drive for Helpline House
When: Friday, 6:15 p.m.
Where: BHS gym
Why: You get to watch basketball—girls at 6:15 and boys at 8, both versus Rainier Beach—and help Helpline House. Bring canned food and catch some hoops.

3. Ovation! Auditions for Les Misérables
When: Saturday and Sunday, by appointment
Where: Ovation!’s rehearsal studio at 600 Ericksen, Suite 103 on Bainbridge Island.
Why: Pawing away your spraying tears, you sort of saw (or maybe you couldn’t bear to get that far in the movie) lettuce-dieted Ann Hathaway cry/sing her way through “I Dreamed a Dream.” Now you get to perform your own version and extend the unbearable suffering! For the audition prepare any song from musical theatre or opera (in English) and bring piano music in your key for the accompanist. A monologue is not required.

To sign up for an audition, email info@ovationmtb.com or call 206-842-0472. Email is vastly preferred over calls.

4. Family Show: The Mitten
When: Saturday, 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Where: BIMA Auditorium (next to KiDiMu), 100 Ravine Lane N.E.
Why: Everyone loves a good Ukraininan folk tale come midwinter. Watch local talent play the parts of the animals in the story.

Free tickets available at KiDiMu or by calling 855-4650. Space is limited. A suggested $5 donation will go toward KiDiMu’s mission.

5. The Art of Island Gardening: The Bloedel Reserve
When: Saturday, 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Public Library, 1270 Madison Ave N.
Why: Second only to going to the Bloedel Reserve is going to the library to hear someone talk about Bloedel Reserve. Ed Moydell, Executive Director, and Andy Navage, Horticultural Director, will give you the backstory to Bainbridge’s Fancy Garden.

6. Vaughn Sherman, Author of Sea Travels, Book Reading
Sea TravelsWhen: Sunday, 3-4 p.m.
Where: Eagle Harbor Book Co., 157 Winslow Way E
Why: Sherman went from fisheries biologist to CIA operative. He’s written two books based on his experiences. Sea Travels tells the actual story of J. Holger Christensen, a Bainbridge Islander and the author’s uncle, and his descendants, salty sea dogs all of them and early Puget Sound pioneers. Sherman’s other book is an espionage novel called Sasha Plotkin’s Deceit, informed by the author’s 20-year CIA career.

7. Bainbridge Symphony Orchestra 2013 Young Artist Concerto Competition
When: Sunday, 6 p.m.
Where: Bainbridge Performing Arts (BPA), 200 Madison Avenue North
Why: If you’ve got talent and are between 12 and 21, show it off and win the chance to perform with the Bainbridge Symphony Orchestra on May 31 and June 2.

Information and an application are available at www.bainbridgeperformingarts.org/products/2013-young-artist-concerto-competition.

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