Tag Archive | "Bainbridge Island"

fire on Marshall Road

House Fire Near Gazzam on Marshall Road

by Sarah Lane and Julie Hall

Bainbridge Island firefighters responded to a call at 6:20 tonight of a 1,500-square-foot house on fire on Marshall Road, in the north Gazzam Lake neighborhood.

The home’s single occupant reported the blaze and heavy smoke after safely evacuating with her dog. Her two cats are still unaccounted for.

The fire started in the bathroom at the back of the home and blew out the bathroom window. The resident had bought a heater earlier today, which was installed in the bathroom a few hours before the fire started.

When Bainbridge Fire Engine 22 arrived, the flames had spread partially into adjacent rooms. The BIFD extinguished the blaze within 15 minutes. The Poulsbo Fire Department and Kitsap Fire & Rescue from Suquamish also responded to the emergency.

house fire on Marshall RoadAlthough visible flames are doused, firefighters remain concerned that the fire may have moved into the walls and roof of the house because of the blown window, which created an opening for flames to spread.

Assistant Fire Chief Luke Carpenter said firefighters will remain at the site for a few more hours to be sure the fire is completely extinguished.

The homeowner was uninjured by the fire but was accidentally sprayed by a hose and is being treated by EMTs.

This is the second house fire on Bainbridge since yesterday morning.

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Photos by Sarah Lane.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 11/16/14: You’re on the Right Track

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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ferry baby zoe with captain and crew

Ferry Baby Zoë’s Family Meets Captain & Crew Who Assisted with Birth

A local celebrity was aboard the 9:35 a.m. ferry on Saturday. But unlike most celebrity appearances, this little star slept through the whole thing.

Baby Zoë and her parents Christina and Chris Hammond and three-year-old sister Ava gathered to meet Captain Russell Fee and crew members who helped her sail into this world as her mother’s labor progressed rapidly on the 5:20 a.m. Bainbridge Island boat to Seattle on October 22. The Hammonds thought they would have plenty of time to make it to Swedish Hospital in Seattle for the birth of their second child, but Zoë had other plans, and before Captain Fee could get his boat ashore, she had arrived.

While Zoë quietly snoozed (following a wakeful night), the rest of the group chatted on smoother seas about the emergency that resulted in a very happy ending.
ferry baby zoe blanket
Chris and Christina thanked the captain and crew, offering them a gift of appreciation. And in turn the ferry crew gave the Hammonds a one-of-a-kind blanket to remember her unusual birthday by. Washington State Ferries (WSF) Communications spokesperson Broch Bender also was there to meet the Hammonds and present gifts on behalf of WSF.

Captain Fee described the morning crossing: “Up in the wheelhouse I heard that contractions were 7-9 minutes apart. Then they were five minutes apart. Then I got a call that the crew was moving Christina upstairs [to the medical emergency room]. The next call was that there would need to be an ambulance. We increased our speed from 18 to 22 knots with all four generators working.”ferry baby zoe blanket

“It was not our plan. Thank you. I didn’t feel concerned at all the whole time,” Christina Hammond told Captain Fee and the crew members who had repeatedly checked on her in her car and finally helped move her upstairs.

Three nurses, two doctors, and several EMTs who happened to be aboard and answered the captain’s call for assistance delivered Zoë, who arrived at 6:01 and was taken by ambulance to Swedish, with no further complications. The Hammonds expressed gratitude to those who assisted with the birth and to the paramedics who transported them once in Seattle.

Captain Fee talking with Hammonds

Captain Fee talking with Hammonds

Captain Fee said it was a rare pleasure to be able to meet people under happy circumstances who have had medical emergencies on the ferry. “People have heart attacks, for example, and we usually have no idea what happens to them after they leave us,” he said.

Creating an air of inevitability to the occasion, Captain Fee and Chris Hammond discovered they both graduated from California Maritime Academy. Hammond is interviewing with WSF this week for a job on the ferries. Captain Fee told him, “Use my name!”

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Photos by Julie Hall. Featured in lead photo from left to right: Brian Jonsson, Captain Russell Fee, Christina and Zoë Hammond, Chris Hammond, Ava Hammond, George Conomos, Dave Houck, John Steinberg. 

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How to Winterize Your Chicken Coop

by Allison Krug, science/medical writer and BI chicken farmer

With the shorter days and colder weather, you may wonder if your chickens are comfortable. Should you be supplementing the light in their coop to keep them laying through the winter? Do they need extra light for warmth? Should you buy a warmer for their water? What do chickens (and their keepers) in Pennsylvania or Minnesota do?

Gardeners here know that much of thishens state is temperate, and Bainbridge Island is actually in USDA hardiness zone 7b (as is a strip of the southeast from Texas to North Carolina). Our temperatures rarely dip below freezing, so compared to chickens living farther north in zones 3 and 4, ours are considerably more comfortable. And they’ve been preparing for winter.

By now they’ve gone through their molt and should have a nice cape of glossy feathers. During the molt, their laying slows, if not stops, a sign of the protein competition between egg production and feather production. If you avoid supplementing daylight with a low-voltage light source, you’ll ensure their protein supply goes to feathers for warmth. Yes, you’ll see a decline in egg production, but with younger birds (in their first year of laying) the decline will not be as noticeable. Last year we saw an approximate 30% decline. Instead of 18 eggs a week, we were getting about a dozen. Our younger hens kept laying while the older hens took a couple of extra days to lay another egg. The entire molt process can take a month or more depending on the hen and her nutritional status.

Home to Roost coop on Bainbridge Island

Home to Roost, Bainbridge Island.

In addition to age, breed of chicken can make a difference in terms of hardiness. We found that our large Jersey giant continued laying and weathered the winter very well. The Rhode Island Reds, which are good meat birds as well as solid layers, also fared very well. Minnesotans and Alaskans posting to a chicken forum say that Buff Orpingtons, Plymouth (or “Barred”) Rocks, and Red Stars and Black Stars (hybrid breeds) do well in cold weather.

Breeds with larger combs and wattles will tend to get frostbite, but you can help prevent that with a coating of Vaseline. Although these tough northern birds sometimes live in a three-sided shelter in the middle of a snowy field, you might want to be sure your coop isn’t too drafty but does have proper ventilation. Use gaps no bigger than half an inch, though, or you’ll find more than fresh air getting into your coop!

Ladies of Wisteria Place, Bainbridge Island.

Ladies of Wisteria Place, Bainbridge Island.

In a temperate climate like ours, winterizing is pretty easy. For example, Rolling Bay Farm’s Adrienne Wolfe uses a “deep litter system.” She keeps about six dozen laying hens to supply her farm stand with fresh eggs. “I just keep adding bedding material—straw mixed with about 20% pine shavings—to the floor of the hen house,” she explained. “The chickens mix the materials together to create compost, which heats the coop as the manure decomposes.” Adding fresh bedding keeps the methane levels down so the chickens don’t get sick. The manure will dry and turn into a fine dust at the bottom of the coop. In the spring you can shovel out the bedding and add it to your compost pile. I appreciate the sheet-metal floor in my coop because it makes cleaning with a hose quite easy!egg

One of my favorite chicken husbandry books is Choosing and Keeping Chickens by Chris Graham. Bay Hay & Feed carries an excellent selection of books on chicken breeds, and there are plenty of good web resources, such as Henderson’s Handy-Dandy Chicken Chart.

[This article from the archives was originally published November 25, 2012.]

 

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Images courtesy of RickPilot_2000 and Julie Hall.

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red mailbox with white daisies

Letter to the Editor: Support One Call for All Thanksgiving Weekend at Bay Hay

The Bay Hay & Feed Buy Local/Give Local “One-Stop” Shop this Thanksgiving weekend is back by popular demand.

For purchases made on November 28 and 29, Bay Hay & Feed will donate 15% of all sales to the community pool of One Call for All.

Here is your chance to get your holiday shopping done early, support a local business, and help fund the 96 non-profit agencies for which One Call for All raises money.

On behalf of One Call for All and all of the people served on Bainbridge Island, I want to extend a huge thank you to Bay Hay for their extraordinary commitment to supporting our community.

—Jon Green
One Call for All Board member

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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Visconsi Site Plan

Letter to the Editor: Visconsi’s Two-Page Newspaper Ads Go Too FAR

Have you seen Visconsi’s two page ads telling us how wonderful their new shopping center is going to be? You know, the one with artist’s renderings that make it look like a visitor’s center from one of our national parks? Along with the dreamlike renderings, Visconsi continues to recycle a claim that featured prominently at last January’s hearings. It has to do with FAR: Floor Area Ratio. From their ad:

“The city’s commercial zoning code allows the building of over 106,000 square feet on the site. We plan to build less than 62,000 square feet.”

During the January hearings, Visconsi’s architect and city’s lead planner made a big deal over this. A slide with “1/3 FAR” was displayed in big letters. Accompanying it was a soothing explanation of how a shopping center three times as large could have been located at the site, all based entirely upon one of several regulations contained in the city’s zoning ordinance. The claim is misleading to say the least. Just how misleading? Judge for yourself.

FAR is a reference to the ratio of a parcel’s size to the total building floor area. The calculation only includes parcel size divided by building floor area. It doesn’t include roads, sidewalks, parking lots, storm water facilities, trash collection stations, wetland buffers, and so on—just parcel size and building floor area. The FAR for the High School II zoning district is 0.3, which by itself would allow total floor area 30% the size of the property. It is important to note that this does not necessarily mean 30% coverage of the site because multiple-story buildings count toward the FAR based upon the total area of each floor.

When talking about FAR it is also important to remember that our municipal code includes various other regulations for development: what uses are allowed, maximum size of buildings, minimum parking, storm water management, levels of service concurrency, and more. FAR, or floor area ratio, is just one of them, and developments are not approved on the basis of one but rather upon compliance with ALL of the regulations. Simply stating what could have been permitted on the basis of FAR is wrong and gives an impression that Visconsi showed restraint in how intensely to development their property when this actually is not the case.

Digging deeper, let’s take a look at the Visconsi site plan. The trees along SR 305 are required buffer. At the northeast corner there’s a wetland buffer and a narrow buffer adjacent to the Stonecress neighborhood. Almost all of this is required and cannot be built on. What is left: buildings, roads, parking lots, detention pond, rain garden, sidewalks, and interspersed plantings. For all intents and purposes, the Visconsi development covers all allowable area on the property. The only way the square footage of buildings could have been significantly increased, and more of the FAR used, would have been to construct multistory buildings with underground parking. This was brought up at last January’s hearing, along with the possibility of including residences over retail. Visconsi was not interested. Why? Because Visconsi’s preferred shopping center layout is a typical sprawling site plan with easy access with cheaper construction costs. Building multistory buildings, with underground parking, is much more expensive. This is one of the reasons our American landscape is being overrun with sprawl: It’s cheaper and competes well with established town centers. It has absolutely nothing to do with contributing to community. It’s all about making money.Visconsi Site Plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Given the type of development Visconsi builds, there is no way a significantly larger complex could have been approved. But there’s another important reason why significantly more of the allowable floor area ratio for the Visconsi site is unattainable: traffic.

All developments generating 50 or more car/truck trips per day require a certificate of concurrency to be approved. This certifies that the level of service at nearby roadways and intersections will not be reduced below the minimum of LOS D or, if it is, the impact will be mitigated. The traffic study done for Visconsi shows projected levels of service at nearby intersections very close to LOS E. Adding significantly to the floor area of their new complex would also have added significantly more traffic, which would have pushed the levels of service below LOS D. Had this occurred, Visconsi would have been required to mitigate the impact. How such an adverse impact could be mitigated was never discussed during the Visconsi review. In reality, it would have been very difficult. Just on the basis of traffic impacts alone, a Visconsi shopping center almost twice or three times as large is simply not a credible proposition. The city’s lead planner even admitted as much, under oath, during last January’s hearings.

So why does Visconsi continue to milk this claim of building FAR less than allowed? Because Visconsi assumes we don’t know any better. In this country, money buys votes and Visconsi is obviously hopes that paying to publish half truths over and over again will change minds, buy favor, and help to fill their new shopping complex with blissfully ignorant consumers.

—Ron Peltier
Bainbridge Island

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christine chapman

Crumbs Cakery Serves up Artful Sweets for Your Special Occasion

To see her work, one can only conclude that Christine Chapman, owner of Bainbridge-based Crumbs Cakery, is of an exclusive order of cake masters. If taste is the judge, the fact that many of her customers are already repeats suggests that she gets more than the design right.

Chapman grew up in Austria making cakes from scratch with her seasoned baker grandmother and mother. When she began having her own children—three boys—she found herself taking her home-grown cake making to a whole new level, creating themed cakes for the evolving interests of her sons.

Like many professionals, as a baker Chapman has no professional training. Possibly her best claim to authenticity as a cake maker is the fact that she has never purchased a cake from a store.

baby cake

Baby cake

Although she has an established menu, her made-to-order cakes are her best-sellers. Having launched her business from her Bainbridge Island home kitchen in August, she said, “So far I’ve gotten the most orders for boys birthdays, from dragons to Legos to Seakhawks to Minecraft themes.”

Having submitted each of her cake recipes to and gained approval from the Washington Health Department, Chapman offers a range of flavors, styles, and sizes. Her college degree in building restoration is evident in her approach to creating cakes. She declines the title of artist but acknowledges the influence of her educational background in her cake making, pointing out her sculpting: “I like working with my hands.”

Her floor-to-ceiling, double-doored pantry of astonishingly wide and meticulously organized cake-making supplies reveals the science in the art of her cake work. From measuring tape to protractors, rolling pins to dowels, exacto knives to fondants, Chapman hand-cuts each square of her popular Minecraft cakes, hand-colors her frosting, and uses as much organic, locally produced ingredients—butter, flour, sugar, eggs—as she can get her hands on.

Top of plane cake, in process

Top of plane cake, in process

For her made-to-order jobs, she often provides via email initial design sketches to customers. I asked her if she has a background as an artist, and she guffawed, saying, “I’ve gotten better.”

About the local response to her cakes, Chapman said, “It has exceeded expectations.” Laughing again, she added, “It’s probably because my sketches are so lousy.”

When I asked what her personal favorite flavor is, Chapman said salted caramel. I asked her what her customers like best, and she laughed, “salted caramel.”

Crumbs Cakery Serves up Artful Sweets for Your Special Occasion

The Hulk’s hand, in process

These days Chapman is creating 1-2 cakes a week, which keeps her quite busy. “I thought it might be one a month. Right now this is as much as I can handle.”

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Photo of Christine Chapman with her tools of the trade, plan, and Hulk hand by Julie Hall. Baby cake courtesy of Christine Chapman.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 11/10/14: POW! Secret Agent Week

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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CrossCountry by Anne Howard Linquist

Two Bainbridge Seniors Finish in Top Third at X-County State Championships

Three Spartans qualified for yesterday’s, November 8, State Cross-Country Championships at the Sun Willows Golf Course in Pasco Washington. All three finished in the top half of the state, and two made it into the top third.

On the boys’ team, Senior Keith Carlson broke his own personal record by 16 seconds, a minute and a half off the winning time set by North Central’s Tanner Anderson who ran the 5,000 meters in 14:31.70. Carlson finished 31st out of the 143-man field.

Representing the girls, Senior Haylee Derrickson, who is only in her second year of cross country, finished 45th out of a field of 144. Her time was just over two minutes off Lakeside’s Andrea Masterson’s winning 17:40.90.

Spartan Junior Devon Reynolds, also in his second year of cross country, finished 92nd, at 17:05.98.

Coach Anne Howard Lindquist reported that the trio are among the top 10 fastest Bainbridge Island XC runners at the State Championships.

The Spartans did not qualify as a team. The top team honors went to North Central, Kamiakin, and Bishop Blanchet for the boys and Holy Names, Mountlake Terrace and Glacier Peak for the girls.

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Photo by Anne Howard Lindquist. Shown are Haylee Derrickson, Keith Carlson, and Arthur Bacon. Mary vanDyke and Britt Lindquist also traveled with the trio.

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mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

Photos of the Day: ‘Shroom Safari

With the rain and the waning sunlight, up sprouts a magnificent menagerie of all manner of mushroom. Bring it, November in the Pacific Northwest!

Bainbridge Island photographer Marilynn Gottlieb shared these ‘shroom shots. Alas, no toads are sitting on them, but one can dream.

mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mushroom by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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fall color by Joe Michael

Weather: Sunny and Cooler

The rain and wind storm that blustered through our area and knocked out power to thousands on Bainbridge Island yesterday brought a sunny and cooler front on its heels.

According to the National Weather Service, by midday today after the fog burns off we should see calm sunny skies with a day-time high of about 50 degrees F, extending through Saturday. Night-time lows will dip in to the low 40s. Patchy low-lying fog will hang around at night and into the mornings.

Expect rain on Sunday, followed by more sunshine into the first part of next week.

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Photo courtesy of Joe Michael.

 

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Ross Olsen and Winchester by Pat Egaas

Wheelchair Accident Victim Upgraded from Critical to Serious Condition

On the evening of October 29, a well-known Bainbridge Island resident, Ross Olsen, collided with a small pickup truck while traveling in his motorized wheelchair along Madison Avenue in Winslow.

Following the accident, which threw Olsen, 52, onto the ground, he was airlifted to Harborview Hospital in Seattle for emergency surgery. According to friends (Olsen does not have family in the area), he sustained five compound fractures in both of his legs. Doctors operated late on the night after he arrived to put in plates and external screws at each break. His blood pressure was dangerously unstable for several days, and until today, November 6, he was in critical condition in the ICU.

This afternoon Olsen’s close friend Laura Weingaertner contacted Inside Bainbridge to provide an update of his condition, after spending two hours visiting with him. He as been upgraded from critical to serious but stable condition. Weingaertner said he will most likely remain in the ICU for a few more days, as he is still on supplemental oxygen. Doctors have not been able to repair the more severely broken leg due to swelling. Surgery on that leg will likely be next week.

Weingaertner said the hospital is allowing visitors (call for times). “Ross would love to see people. His tube has been removed, and he now has his cell phone so feel free to call if you have his number,” said Weingaertner. “Someone dropped off a basket of messages from the Island and he LOVED it; they are hanging around his room!”

Olsen’s dog Winchester was riding with him in his chair at the time of the accident. He was treated for injuries by Winslow Animal Clinic, which opened its doors after closing to provide emergency care. Winchester is staying with a friend and doing well.

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Photo of Ross Olsen and Winchester by Pat Egaas, used with permission by Pat Egaas.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 11/2/14: Be in Your Body

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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Mailboxes

Letter to the Editor: This Ice Hockey Mom Is Grateful (and Having a Blast)

Most of the time I know what to get, or what to do, to say thank you. A special flower, an arrangement from our garden, a surprise drop-in for tea, fresh bread, a card . . . but there are some folks who are so downright humble and generous that I don’t know what to do! So, I have decided to embarrass them anonymously. They will know who they are!

Our family is an ice hockey family now. I thought I knew what that would entail when we said “OK” to the enterprise, bought the gear, found a landing strip in the garage for the big bag, and positioned the sticks by our front door (oh, and retrieved a line-up of pucks from the gutter). I started carpooling on Tuesdays—three boys crammed in the backseat chomping away on their dinner on the way to the rink while we talk about school, or current events, and then they respond with sonic fart noises or chug Gatorade and burp loudly into the camera while they film our twice weekly 45-minute drive (each way). Then I volunteered to be team manager, thinking I did okay for roller hockey, I can do ice hockey. I didn’t really know what I was in for. What makes it all worth it is seeing my son pop out of his Thursday carpool at 8:40 p.m. with a big smile on his face, a belly full of KFC (“Mom, it’s the best restaurant ever!”), a flushed face from skating, and friends in the truck. The investment in the sport goes beyond dollars—the families invest in one another.

The investments are continuous, from carpooling to bake sales. We so appreciate the generosity of the Bainbridge community when we were at T & C last weekend. Thank you for helping these kids pay half of their fee for the upcoming Portland tournament! But the returns on these investments are priceless. We laugh when some of the parents get out on the ice to do some power skating or practice their hockey stops—truly a fearsome sight! We’re loud when we cheer the kids on at games (it’s okay to be raucous at a hockey game). One of the coaches has a big pickup truck. The back of it is filled with gear. Any time you need something, he’s got the tool to do the job, or a stick the right height. I still don’t understand all the gear nuances, but I know who to go to for help. And the older kids are generous with their encouragement; our younger son took up the sport reluctantly because he just loves one of the older guys who took the time to skate around with him and help in the early days.

What is it about the sport that is so compelling that we quickly adjusted to the thrice weekly 90-minute commute to East Bremerton and back? I just learned the coaches are all volunteers, too. They don’t even get a break on their $1,450 registration fee. It is amazing. My brother played hockey in high school and continues to play in adult leagues, so I have a peripheral sense of the sport’s capacity to engender a lifelong commitment. But I continue to be amazed by the generosity of these families. This consistent sentiment made me realize tonight that I really need to find a way to say thank you even if I have a few misfires (microbrew tossed in the truck, gift certificate to Mobil for hot dogs, bottomless KFC bucket).

We’ll be down in Portland for an ice hockey tournament over Thanksgiving, a holiday that is usually a big party for family and friends. We usually host big festivities, fishing trips, fried bird on the beach . . . the gatherings have been legendary. I was a little sad to give that up. But I thought maybe we’d just find some cool Portland place to enjoy a meal (we’ve never been to the epicenter of cool) but now I know what I really want to do: Coordinate a crazy potluck with the other families for whom I am most grateful.

Thank you, ice hockey families! You know who you are!

—Alli
Bainbridge Island

 

Photo courtesy of Taz Sporkist.

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Horsehead by paul brians

Winslow Halloween 2014 Photo Gallery

Downtown Bainbridge Island waved its freak flag Friday night for its annual community Halloween celebration spectacle.

Thank you, Paul Brians, for sharing these photographs of Winslow in creative costume as Eagle Harbor Congregational Church’s organ music drafted downtown and everybody got to be a little different from their “normal.”

View our photo gallery of Halloween highlights (and don’t miss the Flash Mob Video!):

Mime

Mime

Jack Sparrow

Jack Sparrow

Stay Puft man & Pirate

Stay Puft man & Pirate

Willy Wonka

Willy Wonka

Unicorns

Unicorns

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman

Green Stripes

Green Stripes

Queen of Hearts

Queen of Hearts

Tie Dye

Tie Dye

Rainbow Unicorn

Rainbow Unicorn

Grapes

Grapes

Spider

Spider

Flags Down

Flags Down

Winds

Winds

Athena & Ninja

Athena & Ninja

Fireman

Fireman

Mad Hatter

Mad Hatter

Furry

Furry

Flutist

Flutist

Band Conductor

Band Conductor

Flags Up

Flags Up

Rolling Bay Shirt

Rolling Bay Shirt

Socks

Socks

Green Dogs

Green Dogs

Witch & Ladybug

Witch & Ladybug

Jumping Dog

Jumping Dog

Train Engineer

Train Engineer

Cowboy & Turtle

Cowboy & Turtle

Feathered Witch Hat

Feathered Witch Hat

Goldfish Princess

Goldfish Princess

Shark & Bait

Shark & Bait

Woman Warrior

Woman Warrior

Mall Witches

Mall Witches

Super Mario

Super Mario

Pink & Green

Pink & Green

Horsehead by paul brians

Horsehead by paul brians

Queen & Princess

Queen & Princess

Man & Dog

Man & Dog

Green Hands

Green Hands

Lollipop

Lollipop

Orange Hand

Orange Hand

Incredibles

Incredibles

Hair & Feathers

Hair & Feathers

P1030456

P1030456

P1030460

P1030460

Rainbow Hat

Rainbow Hat

Soldier & Gypsy

Soldier & Gypsy

Cardboard Reindeer

Cardboard Reindeer

Gray Beard

Gray Beard

Directing Traffic

Directing Traffic

Vampire

Vampire

Early Americans

Early Americans

Virginia Mason Staff

Virginia Mason Staff

Japanese Outfits

Japanese Outfits

IMG_4415

IMG_4415

IMG_4426

IMG_4426

IMG_4438

IMG_4438

IMG_4416

IMG_4416

IMG_4418

IMG_4418

Halloween

Halloween

MimeJack SparrowStay Puft man & PirateWilly WonkaUnicornsWonder WomanGreen StripesQueen of HeartsTie DyeRainbow UnicornGrapesSpiderFlags DownWindsAthena & NinjaFiremanMad HatterFurryFlutistBand ConductorFlags UpRolling Bay ShirtSocksGreen DogsWitch & LadybugJumping DogTrain EngineerCowboy & TurtleFeathered Witch HatGoldfish PrincessShark & BaitWoman WarriorMall WitchesSuper MarioPink & GreenHorsehead by paul briansQueen & PrincessMan & DogGreen HandsLollipopOrange HandIncrediblesHair & FeathersP1030456P1030460Rainbow HatSoldier & GypsyCardboard ReindeerGray BeardDirecting TrafficVampireEarly AmericansVirginia Mason StaffJapanese OutfitsIMG_4415IMG_4426IMG_4438IMG_4416IMG_4418Halloween

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Photos by Paul Brians and Sarah Lane

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Wheelchair by Marcel Oosterwijk

Account from Driver of Vehicle in Collision with Man in Wheelchair

The woman in a small pickup truck who collided with a man in Winslow in a motorized wheelchair last Wednesday evening, October 29, spoke with Inside Bainbridge to give her account of what happened that night.

A Bainbridge Island resident who preferred not to be named, the driver said she was heading north on Madison Avenue in the dark when she saw something faintly glittering in her lane ahead of her. She said she then realized it was a person in a wheelchair without lights in the middle of the road weaving and traveling southbound toward her.

“I hit the brakes as hard as I could. I had almost come to a complete stop. [My truck] pushed the wheelchair maybe a foot and a half,” she said. Emergency dispatch records indicate that the accident occurred just before 6:45 in the evening.

The driver said when she got out of her vehicle she heard a dog crying and then saw someone pick the dog up. She said she realized the man was on the ground bleeding. “I grabbed a wad of paper towels to stanch the blood from his leg.”

Referring to the stretch of Madison near the Eagle Nest Apartments where the accident occurred, the driver said, ”The bike lanes are wide along there, and you know to be careful.”

The driver, whose friends said she was traumatized by the incident, told me she was still distressed but knows she did nothing wrong. “I feel bad that he was hurt, but it was through his own actions. . . . He was weaving back and forth. Maybe he should not have been out operating his wheelchair,” she said.

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Photo courtesy of Bainbridge Island Fire Department. 

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Schulze

City Council Approves Property Tax Increase for 2015

City Manager Doug Schulze gave a brief review to Council Tuesday night, October 28, of where every bit of a property tax dollar goes on Bainbridge Island. This brief presentation preceded the Council’s unanimous vote to enact a slight property tax increase.

Schulze used PowerPoint slides to show that the lion’s share, 30.6 percent, of property taxes goes to the Bainbridge Island School District. State of Washington schools get 21.89 percent. The City of Bainbridge Island takes a much smaller portion, 12.7 percent, followed by the Bainbridge Island Fire District, with 11.7 percent, and Kitsap County, with 10.5. The rest goes to Public Utilities District 1, o.7 percent, and the Kitsap Regional Library, 3.6 percent.

Schulze explained that the tax rate is $11.27. On a home with an assessed value of $500,000 the taxes would come to $5,634.80 of which $714 would go to COBI.

The approved increase amounts to 0.8901 percent, or $61,054, of the amount levied in 2015, or $6,859,383, plus any increases to property values, which come to $53,882. With the tax refund amount being $18,134, the total levy comes to $6,992,453 on total assessed valuation of $5,713,489,997. Assessed valuation would in fact decrease the levy rate from $1.309 to $1.221 per $1,000.

The amount will got toward repaying general obligation bonds approved in 2001 to finance the costs of acquiring and preserving forested areas, open space, wildlife habitat, and farms and agricultural lands and creating new trails and passive parks. The debt service on those bonds for the year 2015 will be $607,700.

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The Virtues of Visiting Cannon Beach in the off Season (w/ Photo Gallery)

Why drive down to Cannon Beach during the “off season,” with possibly blustery rain and cold temps? Some might respond, It’s Cannon Beach, ‘nough said.

But here are more reasons. It’s cheaper than Hawaii. It’s arguably the most beautiful time of year there. The rates are way reduced. You’ve got the place to yourself, more or less. It’s far enough away to feel like you’re on vacation but an accessible half-day’s drive—four to five hours from Bainbridge Island—and a lovely one, especially if you stay west off of I-5. Your dogs can run free on the beach with official sanction from the State of Oregon, and your four-leggeds won’t give a fig if it’s raining.

Ocean Street, Cannon Beach.

Ocean Street.

Haven’t been to Cannon Beach, Oregon, you say? To quote Gandalf, “Fly, you fools. . . .”

The worst thing that can happen to you in Cannon Beach during the off season is getting wet. Sound familiar? The lovely part is you’re doing it on one of the most stunning beaches on the entire west coast, in sand rather than mud, and with Haystack Rock as your spirit guide. Plus, you’re on vacation, so after you venture out into the elements with your happy kids and dogs and fashionista Gortex, you get to go back to your hotel room, suite, cottage, or rental house, strip off your wet garb, dry off, and head out for a reward of brownies and coffee, chili and beer, fish and wine, Mexican and margaritas. . . . Or you can kick back with room service and games and/or movies.

Ecola State Park.

Ecola State Park.

Although some blessed days in late fall, winter, and early spring bring sun, go prepared for wind and rain. Take layers. Take ample changes of clothing and shoes. Get a place with a stove or fireplace to cozy up to. With this arsenal, you will be prepared for literally any weather, and you will be undaunted to venture out to explore the beach and nearby parks, which are worth getting wet, muddy, wind-blown, and hungry for.

The main strip of Cannon Beach will keep you occupied from south to north for 3-4 hours of  walking. But don’t skip Ecola State Park, which is a picturesque 10-minute drive north of downtown Cannon Beach. The gorgeous wooded bluff hike from there to Indian Beach is about 2 hours roundtrip of up and down winding. If you’re feeling ambitious, you can extend the hike from Ecola Point up to Tillamook Head. Oswald State Park, a short drive south, is also well worth visiting for the view.

California newt.

California newt.

My family has stayed in many places in Cannon Beach over the years. Our current favorite (no affiliation) is the Surfsand Resort. They have increased their dog-friendly rooms to over 50 percent in the last few years in response to popular demand. But this is no squalid doggy motel. The Surfsand is an upscale establishment with appeal for families with or without canines. In addition to offering excellent (30-60 percent off) off-season rates, it sports attractive and comfortable accommodations (all renovated within the last 3-4 years); beach-front rooms; an indoor pool and hot tub; a workout room; friendly and professional service; and lots of feel-good complimentary amenities, including a DVD library and game collection, microwave popcorn, daily afternoon cookies and milk, and treats for kids and dogs alike.

Indian Beach, Ecola State Park.

Indian Beach, Ecola State Park.

Make sure to build in time for puttering around downtown. Whether you want to check out the art galleries, get a toy for your kid or dog, buy a bottle of fine wine, or sample some locally made ice cream, you’ll find plenty to hold your attention.

So, wherever you land in Cannon Beach during the off season, be prepared to leave a little piece of your heart there, and, as always, bring home some sand in your shoes.

Please allow the photo gallery a few moments to load. Note that some images are enhanced with raindrops.

  • Ocean Street.

  • Dunes leading to beach.

  • Cannon Beach.

  • Glimmering Haystack Rock.

  • Gulls.

  • North end of Cannon Beach.

  • Rainy Cannon Beach.

  • Ecola River flowing into Pacific Ocean.

  • Rainy Cannon Beach.

  • Ecola River.

  • Ecola River.

  • Ecola River.

  • Ecola River.

  • Grassy dunes on Cannon Beach.

  • Ecola Point Trail.

  • Ecola Point Trail.

  • California newt.

  • Ecola State Park bluff.

  • Ecola Point Trail.

  • Ecola State Park bluff.

  • Indian Beach, Ecola State Park.

  • Indian Beach, Ecola State Park.

  • Downtown Cannon Beach.

  • Downtown Cannon Beach.

  • Downtown Cannon Beach.

  • Downtown Cannon Beach.

  • Downtown Cannon Beach.

  • Downtown Cannon Beach.

  • Scrub jay with peanut, downtown Cannon Beach.

  • Downtown Cannon Beach.

  • Cannon Beach neighborhood.

  • Cannon Beach neighborhood.

  • Downtown Cannon Beach.

[This article from the archives originally appeared February 23, 2012.]

Photos by Julie Hall; all rights reserved.

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salty dog wash sign

Muddy Mutt? DIY or Full-Service Grooming at Salty Dog Wash

Whether your dog needs a spiffy professional trim or a good long bath after break-dancing on a dead salmon, Salty Dog Wash is open for business and here to help.

Co-owners and long-time friends and Islanders Patty Keplinger and Alison Rice, with support from a third partner Heidi Story, opened Salty Dog to meet a variety of needs. Judging by the time they spent researching the business (over a year) and the setup they created, these women have thought of everything, from full-service grooming to do-it-yourself bathing, big dogs to little, geriatric to hyper hairy Harry.

DIY Dog Washing

salty dog wash

Alison Rice and Patty Keplinger

If you’re looking for an easy and affordable way to clean your canine yourself without a mess at home, Salty Dog offers what looks to be a pretty painless experience for both you and your pooch.

Keplinger explained that the tubs are custom-designed to provide stability and low noise; be spacious enough for large dogs or for those who want to stand in the tub while bathing their dog; and offer access on three sides for easy scrubbing. Traction matts prevent slipping, temperature-controlled water protects against scalding, and the kit and caboodle of aprons, soap, extension hoses, towels, and dryers at the ready make for an efficient process. Have a little dog? Elevated drop-in trays are available for your petite Petunia to stand in. Salty Dog even has child-sized aprons because, as Price explained, “Kids love to help wash their dogs.”

“When we first started telling people about offering self-service facilities for dog washing, people on Bainbridge didn’t get it,” Rice said. “But people from other larger communities like Seattle and San Diego are familiar with self-service dog washing and love it. . . . We wanted to meet the needs of those looking for a more affordable option or whose dogs are more comfortable being bathed by their owners.”

salty dogRice said that the concept is catching on fast. “We already have people who take their dogs for a run on the beach and come in to bathe them afterwards.”

Professional Grooming

Salty Dog Wash also offers professional grooming three days a week by appointment. Services include bathing, cutting, and nail clipping. When I stopped by for a visit, Keplinger and Rice had recently finished working on a large Bernese Mountain Dog, who they said literally took hours to bathe and unleashed a storm of hair. Their grooming prices depend on the level of service needed and the breed, as some take more time to clean and cut than others.

Grand Opening

Rice said that since opening their doors October 20 they could not have asked for a more positive response from the community.salty dog wash

Salty Dog Wash is located in Bainbridge Island’s Pleasant Beach neighborhood between PAWS and Island Cool. “We landed in an ideal spot, next to PAWS, which draws animal lovers, and with a landlord who loves animals,” said Keplinger, who estimates there are about 7,000 dogs on Bainbridge Island.

Keplinger, who has three dogs and initiated the idea for the business, said, “I thought about how I would want to spend my time until retirement and couldn’t think of anything better than being around dogs.”

Salty Dog Wash offers a free wash to newly adopted rescue dogs and to police K9 unit dogs.

They are currently hiring groomers.

Visit their Facebook page to learn more.

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Photos by Julie Hall.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 10/26/14: Your Far-Out Idea Seems Reasonable This Week

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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