Tag Archive | "Bainbridge Island"

Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 10/12/14: ‘Tween 2 Eclipses, Let the Stuff Come Up

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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october 3 art walk

Liquor Control Board Makes Downtown Businesses Booze Bust at Friday’s Art Walk

Last week’s First Friday Art Walk, a monthly evening tradition in downtown Bainbridge art venues, wineries, and select stores, was interrupted when a liquor enforcement officer from the Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB) began asking area merchants if they had permits to serve alcohol at a public event. The officer, Raj Veluppillai, said he stopped in at eight to ten establishments and found that none had appropriate permits.

Veluppillai, who is assigned to cover Bainbridge Island and neighboring Kitsap communities, said he had been on Bainbridge that day talking to a couple of local eateries about permitting issues when he saw people in Winslow walking on the street with open alcohol. He said he observed Art Walk businesses serving free beer and wine without carding or monitoring consumption and people walking from one establishment to another with open cups. WSLCB Captain Lisa Ranke said one Renton-based business was offering free wine tastings and selling bottles on the street.

Veluppillai told me he tried not to embarrass the business owners and did not issue citations but did ask them to stop serving and to wind down the event, making it clear that they could not continue in the future without proper permits. He said most of the business owners were nice about it but that he was surprised by the scene: “It was like 1940s Nevada. It was a whole bunch of businesses. I’ve worked this job for many years and never seen anything quite like it.”

Danger coowner Sara Baetz was serving that night and said the officer asked people on the street to pour out their liquor. Like other Art Walk merchants, she said she wanted to comply with state law but wasn’t sure yet how. Bainbridge Arts and Crafts (a nonprofit) publicist Lindsay Masters echoed Baetz’s sentiment and said that the Bainbridge Island Downtown Association (BIDA) had indicated they would take the lead on the issue.

When I asked Ranke about options for Art Walk businesses, she said probably the best route would be for a nonprofit hosting organization to purchase a special occasion permit ($60/day per event) that would enable other participating businesses in town to serve liquor on their premises. She said Beth Layman in Customer Service issues special occasion permits and can be reached at 360-664-1792.

I asked Ranke if WSLCB would issue retroactive tickets when the investigation into the matter concludes. She said, “We could ticket, but we would look at the totality of the situation, and I can’t see our officer writing a violation.” Ranke commented that there are numerous other art walks and similar events in the region, saying, “We don’t want to ruin anyone’s fun.”

BIDA Program Manager Joan Campbell was looking into the matter today. When I spoke with her this afternoon she was aware of the special occasion license option. I asked her if BIDA would be willing to be the hosting organization for future Art Walks. She said, ”We’re going to handle it to the best of our ability. We want to work with all the Art Walk participants to keep this [liquor] part of the tradition because it’s something people want.” But, she explained, they have to check with their insurance company and determine if it is feasible for them to take on the responsibility. “We’re just not sure at this point,” she said.

Owner of Island Gallery Susan Swannack-Nunn, owner of Island Gallery, said she used to get monthly licenses to serve liquor at the Art Walk but was told a year or two ago she no longer needed them. After looking into the situation, she provided an update for this article. She said that as a corporation she is eligible for a permit to service liquor on site and would be pursuing that option.

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Image courtesy of BIDA.

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foggy road by JonDissed

Weather: Fog Hazard Starts the Week

Expect a foggy start to the week. Here is the National Weather Service forecast for Bainbridge Island:

  • Monday Fog before 11 a.m. Otherwise, cloudy and then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 69 degrees F. Calm wind becoming north-northeast around 6 mph in the afternoon.
  • Monday Night Patchy fog after 11 p.m. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 57 degrees F. North-northeast wind around 7 mph.
  • Tuesday Areas of fog before 11 a.m. Otherwise, mostly cloudy with a high near 67 degrees. North-northeast wind 5 to 7 mph.
  • Tuesday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 51 degrees F. North wind 5 to 8 mph.

Photo by JonDissed.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 9/4/14: Make Room for the New, Kick the Crud to the Curb

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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pumpkins by beth robson

Photo of the Day: Git Yer Big Fat Perfect Punkin’ While the Gittin’s Good

Hey folks, it’s October already, and now’s the time to choose your favorite Halloween squash(es) from Bainbridge’s own Suyematsu & Bentryn Family Farms before the best of the lot is sold out. Seem early? No lie, they go fast.

One of the largest working farms on Bainbridge Island and in broader Kitsap, this 40-acre farm grows—in addition to pumpkins—raspberries, corn, grapes, potatoes, garlic, onions, and seasonal greens.

Find the farm one-quarter mile east of Highway 305 on Day Road.

Hours vary. Learn more at the farm’s website. 

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Photo of the Suyematsu & Bentryn Family Farms pumpkin patch courtesy of Bainbridge Island photographer Elisabeth Robson.

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Sensory Processing Disorder Part 1: Defining It

October is National Sensory Awareness Month. As part of this national education effort, Inside Bainbridge is publishing a series on Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), citing the latest research, information from experts in the field, and personal stories from parents, caregivers, and kids affected by the condition. (Family names have been changed for privacy.) Read the other articles in the series:

The elegance of the animal brain and neurological system makes complex processes seem simple. Our sensory systems tell us where to place our feet, how to maneuver through space, which sounds to ignore and which to attend to, what to focus on in our visual field, how to chew and swallow without choking, when to speak and when to listen, and countless other actions each minute of each day.

bored kids in classroom

All kids have different learning styles, and this teaching method apparently isn’t working.

A child in a classroom, for example, has to filter out noises from other classrooms, buzzing lights, shuffling feet, and a host of other extraneous sounds in order to focus on the most important sound—the teacher’s voice. This can be challenging at times for many children, but for kids with sensory processing disorder it can be downright exhausting, painful, or even at times impossible.

What SPD Is Not

Sensory Processing Disorder is not ADD or ADHD, although it is often misdiagnosed as such. It also is not a form of autism or Asberger’s, though sensory processing problems often accompany those spectrum conditions. SPD is not a “learning disability” per se, but it may lead to learning and emotional problems.

What SPD Is

Research on SPD began in earnest in the 1960s and 1970s with the work of neuroscientist and occupational therapist Dr. Anna Jean Ayres. She described SPD as a neurological “traffic jam” preventing parts of the brain from receiving the information needed to accurately interpret sensory information.

Some peoples’ fun is other peoples’ sensory nightmare.

Extensive research and practitioner work has followed Ayres’s pioneering studies, but a widespread lack of awareness and understanding of SPD still persist in the general population. Some remain skeptical, dismissive, or simply unaware of the condition. But for families, caregivers, and educators dealing with kids displaying SPD symptoms, the condition is very real.

A current goal of the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation is to get recognition for SPD in the next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), due out in 2013. Difficulty getting recognition for “newly emerging” diagnostic conditions is old news. Before 1980, autism was labeled a form of childhood schizophrenia, and the full autism spectrum wasn’t included in the DSM until 1987.

A 2004 study conducted by the SPD Foundation found that “at least 1 in 20 children’s daily lives is affected by SPD.” A 2009 study suggested that “1 in 6 children experiences sensory challenges sufficient to disrupt their academic, social, and/or emotional development.”

Based on new research, the SPD Foundation, led by Director Lucy Jane Miller, Ph.D., OTR, identifies three major categories of SPD:

  1. Sensory Modulation Disorder. This includes sensory overresponsivity, sensory underresponsivity, and sensory-seeking behaviors, or combinations thereof. People with this condition can alternate from one state to the other, sometimes seeking stimulation, for example with hand flapping or spinning, and at other times retreating from stimulation by hiding or going off alone.
  2. Sensory Discrimination Disorder. This includes difficulty with accurate perception of all the five senses, plus proprioceptive awareness (knowing how much pressure to exert), vestibular awareness (knowing where you are in space), and interoceptive awareness (being aware of your bodily functions, like hunger and the need to go to the bathroom). People with sensory discrimination problems may have trouble reading because they can’t discriminate between letters, or they may have trouble identifying who is speaking to them because they can’t locate the sources of sounds.
  3. Sensory-Based Motor Disorder. This includes postural disorders and/or dyspraxia (difficulty planning and carrying out motor tasks). People with sensory motor problems may have low muscle tone, difficulty holding utensils, poor posture, trouble with balance, and low stamina.

Terry and Jan in Seattle have a son, Eli, who slumps and has trouble holding his pencil firmly when he writes and draws. He has difficulty sitting up straight at school and at the dinner table, and his handwriting is poor. Sometimes he falls out of his chair. Eli’s Sensory Motor Disorder makes him unable to keep up with playground activities and leaves him feeling socially isolated and embarrassed, especially around the other boys in his class.

People with SPD may have problems in one, two, or all three areas, to varying degrees. The often very different manifestations of SPD make it a challenge to diagnose and treat. It can be bewildering to people unfamiliar with the condition, making it easy to mistake as the result of poor parenting or character flaws such as stubbornness, belligerence, laziness, or lack of intelligence.

Morgan and Jim, parents in Portland, have two kids with SPD, displaying two very different forms of Sensory Modulation Disorder. Their daughter is generally overresponsive to sensory input, screaming at mild pain and dissolving into long crying fits, even in public, over minor disappointments. Their son, on the other hand, is sensory-seeking, often hitting, biting, touching, and talking excessively in school and at home. Both children are highly intelligent, which is not uncommon for children with SPD.

Boy on metal climbing ladder.

SPD can feel insurmountable.

According to Paula Jarrard, MS, OTR, and doctoral candidate at Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, there is a correlation between giftedness and SPD. She based her conclusions partly on two studies, one by the SPD Foundation that found that 35 percent of the children in one large sample (n=500) from a gifted and talented center exhibited symptoms of SPD. The second study showed that almost 17 percent of gifted children that were tested at a different center had SPD.

Although a significantly higher-than-average number of SPD kids may be gifted, they often suffer from low self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school performance, leading to underachievement in adulthood.

Bainbridge Island pyschotherapist Elizabeth Turner, who works with many SPD children, explains that their difficulty filtering and interpreting sensory information can create chronic stress: “Sensory-challenging situations, like chaotic classrooms, for example, can feel overwhelming and create an anxiety response that becomes physiologically wired into the nervous system. These kids develop a flight, fight, or freeze reaction that becomes involuntary without intervention.”

So what begins as a neurological difference in SPD kids often develops into a socially isolating and emotionally debilitating condition. In the next feature in this series, I will examine what it’s like living with SPD from the point of view of those who have it and their parents and caregivers.

[This article from the archives originally appeared on Inside Bainbridge October 19, 2011.]

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Images courtesy of Mike Baird, Reiner Kraft, and James Emery.

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Blackberry jpod p-27 orca by Kim

New Map Shows Best Places to See Orcas in Puget Sound

Resident orcas are expected in Puget Sound this week on the hunt for their primary food, salmon, which are returning to area rivers to spawn.

Now the nonprofit organization Orca Network has published a map of good on-shore locations for spotting whales in Puget Sound and surrounding areas, from north of Whidbey Island to south of Tacoma.

View the map. 

The map, still being expanded and updated, includes descriptions of prime locations and directions for how to get to them. Orca Network volunteer Thorsten Lisker created the map based on historical sightings records and information from seasoned whale watchers.

The best spot on Bainbridge Island identified on the map is Fay Bainbridge Park. Other close locations on this side of the water are in Kingston, Hansville, and Port Townsend.

Feeding patterns suggest that members of the J, K, and/or L pods are likely to show up any day now looking for chum and possibly coho salmon.

whale sighting locations map

Transient orcas are still around too, as well as at least one humpback, sighted yesterday, September 29, off of Point No Point in Hansville.

It is believed that resident and transient orcas diverged genetically about 70,000 years ago. Our Pacific southern residents in the Northwest live in matriarchal communities, or pods, and eat fish. Transients move in smaller groups and feed on mammals, including seals, sea lions, and other whales.

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Photo of Blackberry (J-27), a J-pod male born in 1991 courtesy of Kim.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 9/28/14: Choose Your Delusion, Get Clarity

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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red envelope stuffers on call for all

Photos of the Day: Red Envelope Stuffers!

Volunteers are busy today stuffing those familiar red envelopes for the annual One Call for All fundraising campaign.

Established in 1960, One Call for All supports more than 90 local non-profit organizations on Bainbridge Island. One hundred percent of contributions from community members goes to local causes. Just in the last 10 years, the Red Envelope campaign has raised nearly $9 million for local nonprofits.

Expect to see those red envelopes in your mailbox in early October. The campaign continues through December 31.

red envelope stuffers on call for all

Kari Wright and Vicky Marsing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Photos by Lynn Smith.

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milk

Helpline House Loses Its Milk Money?

Earlier this month Helpline House quietly announced on its message whiteboard that it would no longer be offering milk in its food bank.

The announcement generated a small flurry of concern on Bainbridge, with some talking on Facebook about creating a milk fund to help out.

Helpline’s Food Bank and Volunteer Services Manager Marilyn Gremse acknowledged that milk is an emotional issue for many people. A ready source of protein and calcium, it holds an iconic place in American culture like no other food. The decision to cut milk from the food bank’s offerings was not easy, but Gremse explained that there were several compelling factors that ultimately made the choice inevitable.

Back when a milk program was added to Helpline’s services by a citizen group eight years ago, the food bank was only serving about 100 families, and milk was considerably more affordable. Gremse explained that these days Helpline is consistently providing food to over 325 families. Milk has been increasingly difficult to pay for given the rise in prices. And as more people choose nondairy milk alternatives, such as soy and rice milk, the demand for milk has dropped somewhat. Adding to the equation is the fact that Helpline’s source for affordable milk, Smith Brothers, recently changed ownership, with the new owners saying they no longer have the capacity to handle the managerial job of supplying milk to Helpline.

Given Helpline’s stretched budget, paying a premium to continue providing milk no longer made sense.

Gremse explained that the goal of the food bank is to offer a variety of nutritious foods to its customers, but that it is not and never has been meant to serve as a family’s only or even primary source of food. “We never turn anyone away, but it’s meant to be a supplemental stopgap measure,” said Gremse.

Gremse pointed out that milk is still available to pregnant and nursing mothers and young children through the Department of Health’s Women Infants and Children (WIC) program for low-income families. She also explained that the food bank is now getting other dairy products, including yogurt and cheese, from more affordable sources.

Helpline volunteers Lisa Giles and Pat Sampson

Helpline volunteers Lisa Giles and Pat Sampson holding a food donation

With 12 employees (some part-time) and about 100 volunteers, many with 20 or more years of service under their belts, Helpline is one of the few community assistance organizations in our area to offer more than just a food bank. Helpline assigns 22 percent of its cash budget to the food bank. The value of food donations and volunteer labor to operate the food program is about $450,000.

I asked Gremse how Helpline is keeping up with the tremendous increase in demand for its services, which also include social work, a clothing bank, and some resource and employment counseling. She said the organization is stable and doing well right now but, “We don’t know where this is going in terms of demand and operating expenses.”

She emphasized the tremendous generosity of the Bainbridge Island community and encouraged people interested in helping specifically with providing milk to donate it directly to the center. Monetary donations are welcome but cannot be earmarked for specific expenditures.

I asked Gremse about another recent change at the food bank. Bread and other baked goods have been moved behind the counter, and people are now required to sign in before taking such products. Previously the bread shelf was up front, and people could stop in any time to grab a loaf or cookies. Gremse explained that documenting bread consumption will help the organization to get funding from the USDA. She said, “We don’t want to discourage people from taking the bread, but we’re finding that now there is enough to go around, including the most popular item—sliced bread for sandwiches.”

Helpline relies heavily on community donations. Gremse said that in particular right now it is seeking (in addition to money) fresh produce and packaged food, children’s and men’s clothing, towels, sheets, and blankets.

As for reviving a milk program in the near future, Gremse said it looks unlikely. “We have to continually evaluate our budgetary priorities.”

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Photos courtesy of Joel Montes de Oca and Helpline House. 

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Mora

Mora Iced Creamery Is Finalist in Martha Stewart American Made Contest

Martha Stewart American Made is the contest that pits American craftspeople against each other in composed, genteel combat over beauty, innovation, and inspiration. Competitors are put in one of four categories—crafts, design, style, or food—the latter being the one in which Bainbridge Island’s very own Mora Iced Creamery is a Finalist.

Another Bainbridge business, Bainbridge Farm Goods, was a Finalist in 2012.

Being a Finalist is a huge honor as only 1,000 businesses across the country are selected. But you can be sure that every finalist wants to be one of the final 10 Award Winners. They get, not only the recognition, but also a trip for two to New York City to attend the American Made event; a spot in Martha Stewart American Made Market; $10,000 to grow their business; a video produced by the Martha Stewart in-house team; and the opportunity to be featured in Martha Stewart Living magazine, on SiriusXM radio, and on the Martha Stewart website. In other words, it’s like the Rockefeller Foundation calling you to tell you you’re a genius. (I’m still waiting . . . .)

American MadeMuch of the decision making is up to the judges. The MS website says, “The executive editorial team of Martha Stewart Living will serve as category judges and oversee the selection process. Martha serves as head judge and makes the final picks.” Those judges—Martha and four of her good-looking foody people in the food category—select 9 of the 10 winners. But the general public gets to choose one winner by voting on the Martha Stewart website. If you want to vote for Mora, click here.

In the description of his Mora Iced Creamery on the Martha Stewart website, co-owner Jerry Perez writes, “When you try it you will be taken back to a time in your childhood or perhaps a faraway place you once visited where you can relive a moment through our ice cream and sorbet.” The MS website editors pretty much agree: “A spoonful of Mora ice cream can transport you to another time and place when your grandmother made ice cream by hand with fresh ingredients,” which made me feel a little bad about my grandmother and also made me want some ice cream.

The audience vote may be influenced somewhat by geography, but the judges are working from set criteria, as shown below. However, note that the last criterion may take into account the geography point just made, if engagement of local community is interpreted to mean “How many votes the locals give you.”

MoraInnovativeness, Demonstrated Creativity, and Originality of Idea 

  • Originality and level of creativity
  • Clearly identifiable customer need
  • Customer value and usability

Workmanship

  • Quality of materials used
  • Attention and care paid to product details and/or customer satisfaction
  • Level of craftsmanship involved in production

Appearance

  • Unique design aesthetic
  • Visual appeal of product packaging
  • Compelling logo and/or typography

Embodiment of American Made Theme

  • Use of local components and processes
  • Engagement of local community

So far, Mora has 1,814 votes. One of its competitors, Trimona Bulgarian Yogurt from Port Jefferson, New York, has 2,235. Would you rather have yogurt or ice cream? Get voting, locals. You have until the end of October 13.

And, if Martha or one of her staff members is reading, I just want to point out that I found an extra space on her website. See criterion above: “Attention and care paid to product details.” An entire extra space.

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Photos courtesy of Mora Iced Creamery and Martha Stewart American Made.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 9/21/14: Examine the Balance in Your Relationships

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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Joe Kunzler

Holy Heart Failure Batman! Navy Growlers Buzz Bainbridge Thursday Night

[Updated at 1:57 p.m. September 19.]

Last night, September 18, at approximately 8:15 roaring plane noise and bright lights jolted Bainbridge residents onto their feet. Some ran outside, others attempted to comfort children awakened by the sound, and still others reached for their glass of wine for a refill.

The mystery hit Facebook, with numerous theories bandied about, the most plausible being alien invasion.

What really happened? According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Seattle spokesperson Allen Kenitzer, three EA-18G Growlers out of Whidbey Island Naval Air Station (NAS) veered from their typical flight path and soared over the southern half of Bainbridge Island. Kenitzer said the jets were operating at legal altitude and speed. But because of their lack of muffling system and infamous noise levels, which can reach literally deafening 110 decibels, it is no surprise that locals were alarmed.

Whidbey NAS Public Affairs Officer Mike Welding did not know why the jets flew out of normal range.

The Growler electronic attack capability provides tactical radar and missile system jamming.

Citing serious health risks associated with the jet noise from Whidbey Naval Air Station near Coupeville, Washington, some local residents formed an organization, Citizens of the Ebey’s Reserve, to fight the practice of daily flights above their homes and area wildlife habitat. Cofounder Caryn Andrews described the sound of the jets as “ripping the fabric of the universe apart.”

Listen here to a report on the subject on NPR Seattle affiliate KUOW.

Comments, including noise complaints, can be directed to NAS Whidbey Island comment line at 360-257-6665 or via e-mail at NASWI@navy.mil.

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Photo of EA-18G Growler courtesy of Joe Kunzler.

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Police car

Who Takes the Fall for a Dog Bite?

At midday Saturday, September 13, a man was walking his dog on leash on the south sidewalk of High School Road, heading toward Safeway. A second man approaching from the opposite direction and heading to the library tripped on an uneven portion of the sidewalk and fell toward the dog. Startled, the dog bit the man on his calf as he fell at her.

According to a Bainbridge Island police report, a pedestrian called 911 to request a patrol check of two men arguing on the street. The caller said a dog owner was not taking responsibility for his dog biting another man. Kitsap Animal Control was not available, so Bainbridge Island Police Officer Ben Sias responded.

Officer Sias found medics at the scene advising the man who had been bitten. They had been getting lunch when the man approached them and asked for their advice about a dog bite. They told him it needed to be cleaned and seen by a physician.

Officer Sias then spoke with both men involved in the incident. The bitten man showed Sias a puncture wound on his left calf. Both parties were in agreement about the events of the incident, but they disagreed about what should be done about it.

The man who had fallen and been bitten faulted the dog owner for having his dog walking ahead of him and not reined in as he approached. He said he had a $300-$500 insurance deductible that he believed the dog owner should pay.

The dog owner said it was not his fault or financial responsibility since the man had lunged at his dog.

Officer Sias informed the two men that a crime had not been committed and that it was a civil matter they would have to settle between themselves or through lawyers.

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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football mailbox

Letter to the Editor: What If We Stop Being Complicit in the NFL’s Immorality?

What if, for one day—a Sunday, a Monday night, or now even a Thursday night—everyone turned off the NFL, didn’t go to the game, didn’t wear the jersey of fan. What if, for one Sunday, civilized people everywhere said that a non-profit that profits in the billions on the lives of its participants and leaves one-quarter of them with permanent cognitive damage, and the rest to die young just isn’t okay. What if for one Sunday, the “fans,” rather than cheering the powerful, stood with the powerless: took a stand that said, it is not okay to cold cock a woman whom you outweigh by 100 pounds, that it is not okay to drag your girlfriend with your car, or use your 300 pounds to choke your “lover.” What if for just one day the money did not rule the day, and for one day, just one, you the football fan, took a stand and told the four-year-old defenseless child, barely more than a baby, that being beaten with a stick by an enraged adult was more important to you than “your team.”

What if we all stop making excuses for the culture of inexcusable behavior? What if we stop holding Ray and Goodell accountable, and started holding ourselves accountable for the role we play in the drama. At the end of the day, we vote with our dollars, our remotes, our adoration. We all have seats in the Coliseum. Sometimes, or maybe for just one day, the game must not go on. What would that world look like, if for one day the truly powerful, the fans, said enough? Until that day comes, enjoy the game.

Brenda Berry
Bainbridge Island

 

 

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earthquake

Earthquake This Morning Largest to Hit Western Washington in Over a Decade

A 4.0 earthquake centered in Hood Canal about 17.5 miles west of Bremerton and approximately 21 miles west of Bainbridge Island rattled area residents at 3:06 a.m. today, September 17.

The quake, 10.3 miles deep, was felt as far away as Seattle and Everett, but there have been no official reports of significant damage.

Although its effects were mild, today’s earthquake is the largest to strike Western Washington in over 11 years, according to Pacific Northwest Seismic Network data. A 4.8 quake rattled the area on April 25, 2003, also west of Bremerton.

Bainbridge Island residents described this morning’s quake in various ways. One resident said it was “like a washing machine that’s bouncing because the clothes have all migrated to one side.” Another thought her dog was shaking the bed from scratching until she realized her dog was not in the room. She said, “There was no sound, unlike most of the California quakes I’ve lived through.” Still another local said she awoke to her mirror shaking, concluded it was an earthquake, and promptly resumed sleep. Others described beds shaking and doors rattling.

A resident approximately 5 miles from the quake, near the little town of Holly, Washington, said no one in her house noticed: “Two dogs, two cats, three kittens, and four people—nothing.”

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Image courtesy of Pacific Northwest Seismic Network.

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ferry

WSF Tells Us About Ourselves as Ferry Passengers

The Washington State Ferries Origin-Destination Survey was just released this week. The extensive, detailed report was compiled from data collected in 2013 directly from passengers on the ferries.

These surveys are conducted every six to seven years as a “way to accurately capture and measure the travel patterns of ferry passengers.” WSF says the surveys asked passengers about their typical routes, how they get to and from the ferry terminal, and the purposes of their trips.

We’ll focus just on the results from the Central Sound Corridor, which includes the Seattle-Bainbridge Island, Seattle-Bremerton, and Edmonds-Kingston routes.

The Numbers

WSF reports that, as every commuter already knows, this is the most-traveled corridor in the Washington State Ferries (WSF) system. In 2013, the three routes carried 12.4 million riders, a surprising decrease from the 13.2 million passengers in 2006 and 14.4 million passengers in 1999. It still feels like 14.4 million Friday nights during rush hour.

On the Bainbridge-Seattle route alone, the total ridership in 2013 was 4.3 million plus 2.0 million vehicles and drivers. That comes to about 17,000 riders per day. This is a surprising decrease from 2006 when there were 18,000 riders per day.

Those numbers may have gone down, but passenger fares have increased. Passengers now pay $7.85, but in 2006 they paid $6.50. The vehicle base fare is $13.55 for vehicles 14 to 22 feet in length, an increase from the $11.25 base fare for vehicles in 2006.

Where Are We Going?

Nothing has changed since 2006 in terms of reasons for ferry travel. More than 61 percent of total trips in the Central Sound Corridor are still for work or school, a difference of +7 percent over the entire ferry system, where apparently people are having more fun than we are.

More than 50 percent of weekday travelers take at least five trips per week on the ferry. This represents a slight decrease (51 vs. 53 percent) from 2006.

Weekends are different. On Saturdays, 69 percent of passengers are heading off to or home from recreation or shopping. That number is up from 59 percent in 2006. Interestingly, the number of people traveling for work or school on Saturdays has dropped 50 percent from 16 percent of riders in 2006 to 8 percent last year.

The Bainbridge-Seattle route also sees only 8 percent of Saturday trips for work/school compared with 24 percent in 2006, a much bigger difference over the years than on the other two routes. Recreation/shopping trips account for 72 percent of Saturday trips compared to 56 percent in 2006.

On the Bainbridge-Seattle route, 54 percent of travelers take 5 or more trips per week. This represents a slight decrease from 2006 when it was 58 percent.

When Are We Coming Back?

Most passengers on the routes return to their origin terminals on the same day. I know this is true because I always see the same people on the way back I saw going out, and I wonder if they were doing the same thing. In 2006, there were 8 percent fewer same-day travelers on weekdays. The percentage difference between 2013 and 2006 for the Bainbridge-Seattle route is 4 percent. But, again, on Saturdays things go wonky: Same-day travelers on Saturdays decreased by 13 percent on the three routes and by 10 percent on the Bainbridge-Seattle route.

How Are We Getting to and from the Ferry?

During the week, people get more exercise. Well, that’s not necessarily true, but during the week there tends to be a higher percentage of walkers, bikers, and bus passengers arriving at the terminal than on Saturdays. A greater percentage of westbound walk-on riders access the ferry terminal on foot or by bike than do eastbound walk-on riders, begging the question “Where do they put their bikes?”

Since 2006, people have gone more green: 6 percent fewer passengers than in 2006 board the ferry by car. The percentage of passengers boarding by bike on weekdays has just about tripled, and the number of passengers getting to and from the ferry by bike has more than doubled. But on Saturdays less than 1 percent of passengers travel to the ferry and board by bike.

About 50 percent of walk-on weekday travelers get to the ferry terminal on foot. Public transit takes about one-fifth of walk-on passengers during the weekday peak periods.

On the Bainbridge-Seattle route, 51 percent of Saturday walk-on passengers get to the ferry by vehicle and 31 percent get there by foot. During the work week, two-thirds of the people who get on the ferry by vehicle are the drivers, meaning there’s a lot of extra room in vehicles.

During the work week, 77 percent of bike riders are between the ages of 41 and 64 (approximately 77 percent) and, when broken down further, the majority of that number are the 41-50 year olds. On Saturdays, the majority are between the ages of 25 and 40. Interestingly, the weekday bicyclists tend to be wealthier than the average rider and so their bicycles are probably really nice.

The majority (89 percent) of bicyclist’s weekday ferry trips are for work. But on Saturdays 40 percent of the rides are for recreation, 30 percent are for work, and the rest are for personal business and special events.

Where Do We Park?

Half of Saturday riders park their car at the terminal before boarding, but 77 percent of weekday travelers do not. The figures for both weekday and weekend parking show an increase over 2006.

On the Bainbridge-Seattle route, the percentage of weekday walk-on riders who parked a vehicle rose by more than 10 percent (34 percent) from 2006 (23 percent). But the majority of weekday riders continue to not park before boarding.

Why Do We Drive?

Most of the people who drive on to the ferry do so because they need their vehicle upon arrival on the other side—that is true for 59 percent of weekday travelers and 71 percent of Saturday travelers. People cited these other reasons for driving: too far to walk, inconvenience of public transport, vehicle used for business, passengers carrying baggage.

Who Are We?

The average age of passengers is 49 years old. Who knows why that is? Just as unclear is why the average passenger makes so much money: $75,000 to $100,000.

How Long Do We Wait?

Passengers on the Bainbridge-Seattle route feel they are waiting longer for Saturday trips in 2013 than they did in 2006. A slight majority think they are waiting more than 1-10 minutes longer on the weekdays than they did in 2006.

Enjoying all the data? There are plenty more (including some lovely maps showing specifically where on Bainbridge passengers began their journeys) in the full report available here.

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Photo by Blake Handley.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 9/14/14: Accepting Life as It Is

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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ferry mailbox

Letter to the Editor: A Simple Solution to Chronic Traffic Delays on 305

The other night we spent 30 minutes going a few miles on 305 from Koura Road to the casino. When we got to the casino, we saw just one car coming from Suquamish. Friends of ours who live near the Bloedel Reserve cannot get home various hours of the day.

Elected officials have proposed a multi-million round-around for which there is no funding. Rather than build yet another big expensive project that takes out the trees, why not just hire someone several hours a day to manually control the light? This would put someone to work and solve the problem tomorrow.

—Rod Stevens
Bainbridge Island

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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mailboxes by Andrew Taylor

Letter to the Editor: Will Virginia Mason Relocate to the Visconsi Mall?

For nearly two months, Virginia Mason had a “Listening Trees” marketing campaign lining Bainbridge Island’s main street Winslow Way, with additional trees at Waterfront Park. These interactive “Listening Trees” (many actually shrubs, which were recently donated to the Park District) were combined with Virginia Mason’s advertisements in Kitsap Transit buses, all the local newspapers, and various other media outlets.

During Virginia Mason’s marketing campaign, a girl climbed a tree with the hope that the community she grew up in would listen and not engage in mall sprawl, and a community boycott of the planned mall was growing.

I find it ironic that, according to word on the street, Virginia Mason has been considering relocating its downtown Winslow clinic to the KeyBank/Walgreens/Visconsi site where 830 significant trees were clearcut.

Word is that at least some of the doctors and employees of the Bainbridge Virginia Mason clinic do not want to move from downtown Winslow, especially not to a site that has so divided our community. Those doctors and employees are currently asking Virginia Mason’s CEO Gary S. Kaplan to reconsider the move.

Is Virginia Mason “listening” to its own doctors, its employees, and the Bainbridge Island community? Will Virginia Listen?

—Debbi Lester, Bainbridge Island, Washington

Note: Inside Bainbridge contacted Virginia Mason to confirm if it is planning to relocate its downtown Winslow clinic to the site at Highway 305 and High School Road. We did not receive a response until publishing this letter the next day. The spokesperson we called has no record of receiving a message from us and would like readers to know that he would have responded immediately if he had known we were trying to reach him.

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Photo courtesy of Andrew Taylor.

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