Tag Archive | "Bainbridge Island"

Christina Albrecht Tinling

Forum Moderator Talks About ‘Bainbridge Islanders’ and Its New Bad Sibling

Even the most active participants of the Facebook forum Bainbridge Islanders don’t have the dedication to monitor every comment of every thread of the buzzing nearly 3,000-member conversation. But as the group’s administrative lead moderator, Christina Albrecht Tinling, sees it all—the good, the bad, the ugly, and just about every nuance in between.

Tinling joined the Bainbridge Islanders admin team as an assistant last December and took over as the main moderator in early March when the forum’s founder Marilynn Price Mitchell decided she had had enough of the bad and ugly and informed the small assistant administrative team that she was deleting the entire forum unless someone was willing to take it off her hands. Tinling told me she believed too much in the value of the forum as a community resource to let it go, so she stepped into the unpaid volunteer role, well-aware that Mitchell had been burned out both timewise and emotionally.

Tinling didn’t pull punches in telling me about the down side of the work. She regularly deals with anger, hurt feelings, complaints, attacks, and legal threats. She said the negative feedback outnumbers the positive by 10 to 1, especially when the conversation gets what she calls “hot” over controversial topics.

Case in point was a conversation thread last week that Tinling said heated up “in the wake of impending bulldozers” to clear forested land for the Visconsi mall. She told me the person who posted the original comment had raised very good points and that she had written him to ask that he tone down part of his comment that violated the forum’s Dos and Don’ts guidelines. She said the conversation had been a very valuable one that had garnered over 100 comments. Then it was mysteriously deleted. In response, Tinling temporarily took over exclusive control of the admin powers. And then she had a lightbulb moment.

She launched a no-holds-barred “bad sibling” splinter forum of Bainbridge Islanders. “At first there was serious blowback and the reception was static-y,” said Tinling. There was a debate about the new forum’s name and then a debate about the debate. She told the group to go with it, saying, “orangutans are skeptical of changes in their cages.” Eventually the name Radio Free Bainbridge was settled on, and things calmed down.

When I spoke with her a day or two after she started Radio Free Bainbridge, Tinling seemed practically giddy at the prospect of a place where locals, including herself, can spout off completely without moderation. ”Get your togas on and take it to the [Radio Free Bainbridge] forum,” she told Bainbridge Islanders. But Tinling is equally relieved at the prospect of taking off the pressure from Bainbridge Islanders, which she describes as “the front porch of the Island general store.” She explained: “I hold the group very lightly; I don’t like intervening and enforcing. But when a political thread gets hot each new comment bumps it to the top, and the regular practical helpful stuff gets buried.”

I mentioned that in the short time since Radio Free Bainbridge launched I had noticed people quit in disgust and then rejoin. Tinling laughed and said she calls that a “rage quit,” a phrase her kids use to describe a frustration moment during videogaming.

I asked Tinling how she handles the logistics of moderating Bainbridge Islanders. A mother of four, she told me she fits 95 percent of maintaining the site into little pockets throughout her day, mostly from her smart phone. Once a week she spends a few hours at her laptop evaluating and approving requests for membership in the forum. The criteria is not always clear cut. Tinling tries to determine what connection each person has to Bainbridge Island if they don’t live here. People with strong ties to Bainbridge, like those who work here, are obvious approvals. Others are a judgment call.

As for why she does it, Tinling said the rewards are closely tied with the challenges of the job. She said helping people work through hurt and alienation with empathy is her biggest reward—that and those two little words, “thank you.”

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Photo of Christina Albrecht Tinling by Julie Hall.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 8/24/14: Teacher, Arise

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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WSF Eagle Harbor Repair Facility

Tacoma Ferry out of Service Until at Least December

Washington State Ferries (WSF) has announced that they now know the cause of the Jumbo Mark 11 Tacoma ferry’s sudden breakdown on August 8, which threw the crucial regional transportation system into chaos for days.

The repair contractor, Siemens Marine Solutions, reported that a fuse blew in the vessel’s propulsion control system. WSF said the blown fuse occurred “without indication to the operating engineers, triggering a chain of events that led to the power failure.”

WSF Communicatios Director Marta Coursey said the Tacoma is expected to remain out of service until at least December, 2o14.

WSF is continuing to review the cause of the incident and what to do about it. “A Board of Inquiry, WSF’s highest level of investigation, convened this week and expects to complete their work once the vessel repair is complete,” said Coursey.

The Tacoma is docked in Eagle Harbor at the WSF repair facility. It was sitting lit up last night, visible from the ferry terminal landing.

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Photo by Julie Hall. 

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Key Bank/ Visconsi Protest Rally Photo Gallery & Video

The final rally around Chiara D’Angelo’s tree sitting yesterday evening drew over 150 people, including numerous community leaders who spoke out in support of the 19 year old’s political activism against a profit-driven corporate value system that sacrifices natural resources and strips communities of sustainable quality of life. (Read more about the rally here.)

D’Angelo said her actions were meant to inspire community activism and spur change. In that spirit, the rally took on a meaning and life of its own, with people of all ages speaking about implementing change to prevent future destruction of natural habitat on Bainbridge Island and more broadly.

Here is a video of rally goers:

Here are photo highlights of the rally:

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kids at rally

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visconsi go away

Debbi Lester

Debbi Lester

Debbi Lester

Ron Peltier

Ron Peltier

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Photos and video by Julie Hall.

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Chiara

Tree Sitter Lands Safely

by Julie Hall and Sarah Lane

Nineteen-year-old Chiara D’Angelo safely descended tonight from 70 feet and over 40 hours in a Douglas fir tree on Bainbridge Island land slated this week for clear-cutting to build a mall.

D’Angelo was harnessed in overnight and for the better part of two days while supporters gathered around her in opposition to the destruction of nearly 8 acres of forest by commercial developer Visconsi Companies.

The exhausted but exhilarated teenager emerged from the woods and hugged her relieved mother. She told a crowd waiting in the dusk, “I didn’t go up there for those trees; I went up for this community.” She encouraged people to stay involved in the civic process.

Chiara and Debra D'Angelo

Chiara and Debra D’Angelo

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Photos by Sarah Lane. 

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tree sitter chiara d'angelo

Bainbridge Tree Sitter Gets 24-Hour Reprieve (w/ Photo Gallery)

Bainbridge Island’s 19-year-old tree sitter, Chiara D’Angelo, will not be arrested today, August 18.

Bainbridge Police Deputy Chief Jeffrey Horn said this morning that Visconsi Companies had asked the department to arrest D’Angelo as a trespasser if she had not vacated the area today by 4 p.m. D’Angelo set herself 70 feet up on a platform in a tree at approximately 3 a.m. today to “block” Visconsi’s clear-cutting of forested land at the corner of High School Road and Highway 305 to build a commercial center.

But at approximately 2:15 p.m. today, City of Bainbridge spokesperson Kellie Stickney told Inside Bainbridge that the deadline for D’Angelo had been extended 24 hours to tomorrow at 4 p.m., meaning that her presence in the tree will not be regarded as trespassing before then. Stickney said, “The city is hoping this will have a peaceful resolution that will not result in an arrest.”

D’Angelo was in good spirits early this evening as a crowd gathered in support of her protest of destroying an ecosystem of over 800 trees and inhabitants.

A crowd formed around D’Angelo’s Douglas fir at 3:30 this afternoon and then gradually made its way to the southeast corner of High School Road and Highway 305, where citizens joined together to sing “All we are saying is give trees a chance” and danced in a circle in a show of solidarity with D’Angelo. Passersby in vehicles and on bicycles showed their support with thumbs ups, waves, and horn toots.

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tree sitter chiara d'angelo

tree sitter chiara d'angelo

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Photos by Julie Hall.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 8/17/14: Think Twice, Speak Once

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial

Two Islanders Reflect on History of Japanese American Exclusion (w/ podcast)

At the end of May Congressman Derek Kilmer introduced a bill in the House to recognize a new name for the Bainbridge Island memorial to the 120,000 Japanese Americans who were forced from their homes to concentration camps during the Second World War, one that acknowledges their exclusion from mainstream American society. If passed, the name will be changed to the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.

Clarence Moriwaki, President of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial Association, explained the reason for the change: “The word exclusion is so vital to completely tell this sad chapter of American history, because not only were 120,000 Japanese Americans forcibly removed and placed behind barbed wire in American concentration camps, but anyone with a drop of blood of Japanese ancestry was forbidden to remain in the exclusion zone. We should remember and honor everyone who suffered from this unconstitutional violation of civil liberties, and vow to never let fear, hysteria and prejudice deprive anyone of life, liberty and equal protection under the law.”

In the following two Bainbridge Community Broadcasting podcasts, Islander Lilly Kodama remembers the exclusion of her family and talks about her brother, Dr. Frank Kitamoto, a 2002 recipient of the distinguished “Island Treasure” award, and Donna Harui, the third-generation owner of Bainbridge Gardens, talks about her family, including about their experiences of relocation during the war years.

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Photo of Bainbridge Island Japanese Exclusion Memorial by Sarah Lane.

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paws kittens

Animal Tales: PAWS Has 80 Kittens for You

by Melissa Byrd of PAWS of Bainbridge Island and North Kitsap

Paws and FinsThank you Paws & Fins Pet Shop for sponsoring our weekly Animal Tales feature.

The call comes in to PAWS: “A cat showed up at my house a few days ago and now she has X (fill in any number between 1 and 8 so far this season) kittens in my X (garage, shed, woodpile, daughter’s closet).” And so it begins. . . .

paws kittens

Apple Boys

Next step is emails, Facebook posts, and phone calls to our foster families to see who is available to take in some of these homeless critters. Our fosters are people who have said they’d like to help out with providing temporary housing for a pregnant mom, a mom with kittens, orphaned kittens who might need bottle feeding, or kittens who just need time to get up to the required 2-pound spay/neuter surgery weight. These families agree to take them into their home for anywhere from a week to 12 depending on the circumstance. We do a home visit to make sure the foster family has a separate place to house the cats/kittens away from their personal pets if they have any. PAWS provides food, vet care, and guidance throughout their entire stay.

When the time comes, the night before surgery, I meet up with the family and take the kittens to my house, dubbed Kamp Kitten, to get them vaccinated, wormed, micro-chipped, and flea-treated. The next morning they are dropped off for surgery. They are picked up that same afternoon and delivered to our adoption center in Kingston, where they can recuperate from surgery. We move kittens from Kingston to our Pleasant Beach location on Bainbridge Island weekly or as space permits.

Fuzz and Fluff

Fuzz and Fluff

When all goes as planned, I will have a litter of kittens at my house overnight and maybe a litter that I am fostering. This season has been a crazy one. We’ve had a couple of fosters who didn’t keep the kittens for the entire time for various reasons, so they weren’t heavy enough for surgery yet. At one time I had 25 kittens and a mama cat in extended attendance at my Kamp Kitten. That’s a lot of litter, food, water, and poop to deal with in the morning before heading to the PAWS Cattery to take care of the 40 cats there and their litter, water, food, and poop.

Right now we have nearly 80 kittens in various stages of our program, either in foster care (we just had a litter of 8 born on Monday who are now in a loving foster home where they will be for another two months or so) or at our Kingston or Bainbridge adoption centers.

Kamp Kitten

Kamp Kitten

Interested in making a place in your family for a kitten or two? Our Pleasant Beach center is at 4688 Lynwood Center Road, and our Kingston center is  26569 Lindvog Road. We are open Mon-Saturday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. at Pleasant Beach. Our hours at Kingston are not as regular due to the lack of volunteers. We are only able to be open there 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday. Tuesday and Thursday we are open 2-5 p.m. As you might guess, we could use voluteers as fosterers and/or adoption counselors.

Learn more about volunteering for PAWS

Photos courtesy of Melissa Byrd.

Paws and Fins

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forest at 305 and High School

Key Bank/ Visconsi Forest Clearing Status + Vigil Saturday

Following the installation of clearing fences around the perimeter of the construction site for the planned commercial development on High School Road at Highway 305, the City of Bainbridge Island (COBI) issued a clearing permit to Visconsi Companies this week.

The next step for Visconsi is to obtain forest practice approval from the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). South Puget Sound DNR Forest Practices Coordinator Larry Fry told me he received the request for a forest practice permit from Visconsi yesterday, August 15. He said now that COBI has provided its permit, DNR would likely provide theirs on a quick turnaround, by this Monday, August 18. Once Visconsi obtains its DNR approval it can begin clear cutting the forested land.

visconsi fencing by julie hall

Clearing fencing

A citizen group continues to fight the commercial center, citing environmental, safety, sprawl, and traffic problems and a fundamental violation of the spirit of COBI’s Comprehensive Plan. Stop Unwanted Development on Bainbridge Island is asking people opposed to the Key Bank/Visconsi plan to join its growing boycott of the shopping center and contact Key Bank immediately with their objections at 800-625-3256.

Vigil Tonight, August 16

Long-time Islanders Chiara Rose and Debra D’Angelo have organized a vigil for the land, to be held tonight beginning at 7 p.m. in the current Key Bank parking lot at 617 High School Road. D’Angelo, Rose’s mother, explained that when her daughter returned home from college she was devastated to learn of the planned development and believes it violates fundamental community values of the majority of people who live on Bainbridge Island.

Learn more about the vigil here.

Inside Bainbridge contacted Visconsi Companies about its intended schedule for the project, but they were not available for comment.

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Featured photo shows trees marked for cutting. Photos by Julie Hall.

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mailbox

Letter to the Editor: Lessons for Bainbridge from Ferguson, MO

Reading about the militarization of the police in Ferguson, MO, it is clear that the surplus weapons and armored vehicles made for our wars abroad have come home, and that police in some or even many places now have force disproportionate to civil needs. We need to know if this is a potential problem here on Bainbridge Island. After all, the wrongful death verdict in the Ostling case is just two years old, and reports by outside experts indicates training lapses in the use of equipment the police carry day to day.

I ask our city council to show leadership in asking the police department to provide an inventory of military-level equipment not used in the course of everyday policing, including helmets, rubber bullet rifles, and tear gas. The council also needs to ask specifically what level of training
the police have had in the use of this equipment.

With the war in Afghanistan winding down, the military will continue to clean out its closet. There are risks to having and not having this equipment. Our city council needs to discuss our own needs, and whether, in the name of risk management, we need to get rid of some of the materiel we may have already accepted.

—Rod Stevens, Bainbridge Island

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Photo by Julie Corsi.

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battle point park girl scouts by julie hall

Local Business Makes Donation to Replace Girl Scout Equipment Destroyed in Storm

Bainbridge Island girl scouts had an unpleasant surprise Wednesday morning, August 13, when they arrived at Battle Point Park to find that their camp site had been seriously damaged by stormy weather. Four of seven tent shelters were destroyed during the night by severe rain and wind.

Rene Hackl said that after learning on Inside Bainbridge about the damage his company Phytools LLC, a high-tech distributor in Winslow, would donate $200 to help cover the replacement costs of the ruined equipment.

About the donation, Program Director Jondra Stimson said, “Wow! What a generous gift. We weren’t sure what to do. We truly appreciate the support of our girl scouts and camp!”

The week-long program leaves its site up on the northeast corner of Battle Point Park throughout the session and spends one night sleeping over.battle point park girl scouts 2014

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Photos by Julie Hall.

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arms around bainbridge by pete saloutos

Get Moving with Arms Around Bainbridge This Saturday for a Great Cause

It’s not too late to sign up to get moving for your Island neighbors in need. Arms Around Bainbridge (AAB), a nonprofit Bainbridge-based organization dedicated to assisting recipients struggling with serious illness, is holding its biggest event of the year this Saturday, August 16, from dawn to dusk.

Swim, bike, row, walk, or cheer on participants in the 8th Annual AAB fundraiser. In addition to the relay swim around the Island and a rowing regatta in Eagle Harbor, participants can bike (or walk) in a new poker event.

Register here.

Poker Bike Ride (or Walk)

Enjoy a self-paced family-friendly bike ride or walk. Visit participating merchants to build your best poker hand. Along the way find prizes, bonus cards, and special merchant discounts. Don’t have a bike? You can still register for the poker event and visit participating businesses on foot. At the end of your ride or walk, bring your best poker hand to the after party to win the grand prize.

30-Mile Around-the-Island Open Water Relay Swim

arms around bainbridge by pete saloutosThe swim begins just before dawn (5:30 a.m.) in Blakely Harbor and finishes at dusk in the same location. It is a continuous relay around the perimeter of the Island, with one or more swimmers in the water at any given time. You must commit to a minimum of one continuous mile and be able to complete your swim in 40 minutes or less. Swimmers are accompanied by safety kayaks and power boats.

Bainbridge Island Rowing Club Fun Regatta

The regatta is in Eagle Harbor from 9 to 11 a.m., starting at the Waterfront Park boat launch.

After Party 

All participants (swimmers, cyclists, walkers, and rowers), volunteers, donors, and sponsors are invited to enjoy the after party at 6 p.m. (location to be disclosed), including grilled salmon (donated by Heather Patrick), Barb Dewitt’s cakes for a silent cake auction, and MCing by Kate Carruthers.

About AAB

Arms Around Bainbridge is currently providing support to seven Bainbridge Island residents all battling serious illness and struggling to provide for their families. Six of the seven have cancer. Since 2007, AAB has helped 18 Islanders, distributing over $306,000 and assisting them in connecting with vital community resources.

arms around bainbridge by pete saloutosAAB’s help is tailored to each recipient’s specific needs, from providing healthy home-cooked meals, to eyeglasses or hearing aids for ears damaged by years of chemotherapy, to money to cover crushing financial burdens from medical expenses.

AAB board member and swimmer Kymmberly Myrick said, “Swimming in the dark and cold waters of Puget Sound is a very small way I can show my support of the courageous women and men of this Island who face their own mortality every day.”

Can’t participate but want to help? Make a donation or sponsor a swimmer here.

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Photos courtesy of Pete Saloutos, a founding member of AAB.

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girl scout shelter destroyed by wind and rain at battle point park by tess haddon

Photo of the Day: Severe Overnight Weather Destroys Girl Scout Shelters at Battle Point Park

Every summer at Battle Point Park, Bainbridge Island volunteers run a week-long girl scout camp. On Monday they set up seven shelters to use throughout the week. Last night’s heavy wind and rain destroyed three unit tents and the program tent. Camp instructor Tess Haddon said this morning they found the aluminum supports “snapped like twigs” and “half of headquarters smashed.”

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Photo courtesy of Tess Haddon.

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tansy ragwort

City to Begin Invasive Weed-Targeting Herbicide Application on Rights of Way

At Monday night’s (August 11), City Council meeting, the Council unanimously approved an interlocal agreement formalizing what has been the ongoing arrangement between the Kitsap County Noxious Weed Control Board and the City of Bainbridge Island, in which KNWB provides weed education and noxious weed eradication assistance. More controversially, the Council also unanimously approved a second, related bill giving KNWB permission to apply herbicides on city-owned property and rights of way.

During public comment, Islander Erika Shriner expressed her concerns about such applications, referring specifically to glyphosates, one of the components of Roundup and other herbicides, and a 2013 peer-reviewed report linking glyphosates to nutritional deficiencies and systemic toxicity as well as Parkinson’s, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS, cancer, infertility, autism, obesity, allergies, and other health conditions.

But Dana Coggon, the Program Coordinator of KNWB, who introduced the two bills to the Council, argued that, without the use of herbicides, they cannot put up an adequate fight against noxious weeds, a fight that is required by the Revised Code of Washington (RCW 17.10).

Coggon said that there are 168 noxious weeds to target. She gave the example of knotweed, which she described as growing from 7 to 10 feet tall, with an “immense root system” that extends 30 feet from the parent plant within a single season. She said that one of the control tools available to them now, mowing, actually helps spread knotweed. She said, “The plant loves that.”

She brought visual aids to her presentation including tansy, a tall yellow flower. She explained that tansy causes cirrhosis of the liver and said that, as with knotweed, mowing spreads it.

Pulling the plants isn’t enough either, she said, because a little bit of the root system remains and then begins to spread.

Coggon, who has a Master’s Degree in Wheat Science and who, she said, has studied the path of herbicides in plants, described the process KNWB follows to eradicate plants such as knotweed and tansy. She said first they top the plants and bag them. This step discourages bees from landing on the plants and then transporting the herbicides back to the hive. Then they pull as many of the plants as they can. Finally, licensed applicators use backpack sprayers to target the plants with herbicide multiple times throughout the year.

She described the weeds as a cancer and said that the herbicides are like “a little chemo” to get rid of the cancer.

She said KNWB would follow the rules of Bainbridge Island for herbicides, just as they have been in their fight against knotweed: posting notice 48 hours in advance of the application, staying on site until the application dries to answer questions, and then returning 24 hours later to pull the signs.

Coggon then pointed out that landowners can apply pretty much whatever they want (as long as the products are labeled by the Washington State Department of Agriculture) to their properties on the Island. She described how she once saw a woman on the Island applying an herbicide while wearing shorts and sandals, something that the warning label on the product clearly warned against.

Some other noxious weeds targeted by KNWB are giant hogweed, knapweed, purple loosestrife, hydrilla, and parrotfeather. KNWB reports that loosestrife has invaded wetlands in 48 states, costing about $45 million per year in control measures and in lost forage crops.

The bill approved by the Council says that the herbicide applications will begin “this summer/fall.”

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Photo of tansy ragwort by brewbooks.

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name that bird swivel head

Name That Bird: Juvenile Swivel Head

Been hearing this unusual sound lately at night? This fledgling makes that slightly eery call to mom and dad for food and attention. When I took these recent photos, it was sitting silently in the evening in my yard, apparently practicing hunting on its own. A crow was none too happy to see this youngster moving into its turf, and for a little while the crow raised a ruckus.

In time this bird’s remaining downy baby feathers will be fully replaced with sleeker, more defined plumage, and it will live alone until it finds a mate at the start of breeding season next spring.

This bird is common in the Northwest, and in recent years its population on Bainbridge Island has increased, in part because it is a fairly opportunistic species able to eat a wide range of prey, including squirrels, mice, rabbits, birds up to the size of grouse, amphibians, and insects. It also can eat your small cat. Larger raptors, such as great horned owls, prey on this bird.

Adults make the classic “who cooks for you” vocalization. If you answer it, you just might find yourself having a conversation with one of these lovely raptors.

name that bird swivel head

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 8/10/14: Full Moon Combusting Primal Energy

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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raise the woof khs fundraiser

KHS Raises the Woof on the Rock(s): Get Your Tickets Now for This Catered Concert

Summer is far from over, and this season’s hottest act on the Rock is yet to come. The Kitsap Humane Society (KHS) is throwing a party (adults only) here on Bainbridge Island, and you’re invited.

The brainchild of five KHS board members who live on Bainbridge, Raise the Woof promises to be the first of an annual fundraising party that stretches out a paw to Islanders.

Get ready to pull up a blanket or lawn chair on Saturday, August 16, under the summer sky at beautiful 25-acre Rustica Island Farm, with local food and drink and a concert to remember, all to benefit the animals at our exemplary no-kill local shelter.

Music

The evening event kicks off at 4 p.m. with the funky spin of Dr. Fever, Seattle’s hottest DJ. The musical lineup continues with St. Paul de Vence, a Seattle-based Indie folk band known for its melody-driven vintage acoustics. American soul singer Mycle Wastman will close the night with his unique blend of R&B and soul-influenced pop. A Frontrunner on season three of NBC’s “The Voice,” Wastman interprets the greats with his own strong vocal style. 

Food

raise the woof khs fundraiserBainbridge favorite Metro Market Cafe is providing a catered dinner for general admission guests on the lawn, including one beverage (beer, wine, or non-alcoholic). VIP admission tickets include a deluxe catered meal, unlimited drinks, reserved on-site parking, and special table seating close to the stage. Vegetarian dinner options are available for both general and VIP ticket holders. Beverages will be provided by Bainbridge wineries and breweries.

When

The August 16 event begins at 4 p.m. with DJ music. The concert is from 5 to 9 p.m.

Where 

Rustica Island Farm is nestled down a private road off of Miller Road near Day Road.

Tickets

General admission tickets are $100 each, and VIP tickets are $250. Buy your tickets here. All proceeds will go directly to Kitsap Humane Society.

Parking

General admission parking will be directly across the street from the farm at Ozone International or the Watson Business Park. Parking attendants will be directing traffic. VIP parking will be at the Farm.

About KHS

Founded in 1908, the Kitsap Humane Society is a nonprofit, no-kill organization that admits some 4,200 animals a year. It has one of the highest lives-saved rates in the United States. Learn more at kitsap-humane.org.

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USS Constellation by Robert Dashiell

‘America’s Flagship’ Aircraft Carrier USS Constellation (CV-64) Sails Past South Beach

The USS Constellation (CV-64), one of the nation’s most famous aircraft carriers, was towed past Bainbridge Island’s South Beach yesterday, August 8, on its 16,000-mile journey around South America toward its final destination at a Texas scrap facility. It left Bremerton yesterday morning, where it had been mothballed for almost a decade after its decommission in 2003.

Widely known as “America’s Flagship” and nicknamed Connie by its crew, the Constellation had an eventful and dramatic history, beginning with a massive fire in 1960 during the final stages its construction. A forklift on the ship caught fire and a 500-gallon tank of diesel fuel spilled and spread through the complex of passageways into the ship’s lower levels, creating an inferno that took firefighters 17 hours to extinguish. Fifty shipyard workers died in the fire, with hundreds more lives saved.

Once the Connie was repaired, it was commissioned in 1961. The ship was deployed numerous times for active combat from 1964 to 1973 in the Vietnam War, including in the Gulf of Tonkin.

In 1971 the ship was the site of an aborted mutiny by some of its black crew who were protesting unequal treatment by the Navy.

The Constellation gained its motto “Go Ahead Make My Day,” a direct quote from President Reagan in response to terrorist threats made against the ship when it responded to the American hostage crisis in 1985. The Connie’s crew earned the prestigious Meritorious Unit Commendation for its performance during that deployment.

In 1987 the Connie escorted Kuwaiti tankers in the Persian Gulf under threat by Iranian attacks in international waters.  

USS Constellation by Robert Dashiell

USS Constellation by Robert Dashiell

The following year a fuel leak erupted into the ship’s second devastating fire, which spread throughout the vessel and caused three onboard explosions. Crew members ultimately preserved the ship by closing off spaces and extinguishing the fire in sections. Many suffered serious injuries and smoke inhalation, but, miraculously, there were no fatalities.

After extensive renovation, the Connie had several deployments throughout mid and late 1990s. In 1994, it was deployed to waters off Korea after reports broke on the world stage that North Korea was attempting to build nuclear weapons. It returned to the area in 1999 during heightened tensions between North and South Korea. The same year it began conducting air strikes in the Persian Gulf in response to Iraqi violations of the no-fly zone.

The Constellation was twice awarded Battle Efficiency E as the Pacific Fleet’s best carrier. The ship was retired in 2003 after 41 years of commissioned service.

Thank you to Robert Dashiell, who took the featured photo from South Beach.

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Photo courtesy of Robert Dashiell.

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Tacoma ferry out of service

Problem with Tacoma Ferry More Serious Than Initially Thought

Washington State Ferries (WSF) released a brief status report at 2:40 this afternoon, August 8, about the out-of-commission Tacoma, the 202-car Jumbo Mark 11 ferry that services the Seattle/Bainbridge route.

WSF said its engineers are working with technicians from Siemens Global, Inc., to identify the reason the Tacoma suddenly lost propulsion power on its 12:20 p.m. sailing from Seattle to Bainbridge Island July 29. The failure of the Tacoma lead to massive delays that day and night and several subsequent days of limited ferry service on neighboring runs. WSF said Siemens believes the damage to the vessel is more extensive than the initial review revealed and will need more time to complete its investigation before preparing a plan for repairs.

WSF had hoped to have a repair plan for the Tacoma sometime this week.

In addition to contracting with Siemens, WSF has launched an internal Board of Inquiry to investigate the root causes of the power failure, determine contributing factors, and make recommendations to prevent this type of event in the future.

The Tacoma is currently docked at the WSF Eagle Harbor Repair Facility on Bainbridge Island.

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Photo by Julie Hall.  

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Virginia Mason