Tag Archive | "Bainbridge Island"

where pond by marilynn gottlieb

Name (and Find) That Bird: Silent Stalker

This double challenge comes courtesy of Bainbridge Island photographer Marilynn Gottlieb.

Can you find and identify this familiar species reflected in the Battle Point Park pond among the reeds and branches? It hangs around water and uses its blade-like bill to snap up smaller prey and stab large fish.

Click photo to enlarge (twice).

where pond by marilynn gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 1/25/15: True up What You Want with How You Are

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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floating crane in eagle harbor

How This Rig off Our Shores is Making a Meadow and Why You Should Care

This floating crane at the mouth of Eagle Harbor is in the process of laying sediment for subtidal eelgrass meadow, extraordinarily rich marine habitat destroyed in decades past by the activities in the harbor at the Wyckoff Creosote Plant site.

Between 1903 and 1988, the Plant used creosote, a cancer-causing oily liquid, to pressurize and preserve wood. With plentiful supplies from the massive lumber mill operation also on Bainbridge Island, Wyckoff became one of the world’s leading producers of pilings. In addition to contaminating Eagle Harbor, a Superfund cleanup site, Wyckoff dredged two deep depressions in the seabed to make navigation channels to the site’s dock, wiping out large swaths of eelgrass.

preparing eelgrass for planting

Preparing eelgrass for planting

The work currently underway is phase two of the Milwaukee Dock Eelgrass Restoration Project, coordinated by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). A 1.4-acre, -24-foot depression was previously filled and revegetated with eelgrass shoots transplanted from the rim of the depression. The second depression, -26 feet, is now being filled to prepare for a 1.6-acre meadow.

According to NOAA Restoration Center oceanographer John Kern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is currently filling the remaining depression with a sublayer of pea gravel that they will cover with sand, shipped in by barge. The work began January 8 and is expected to continue through midFebruary. Eelgrass will then be replanted in the bed in late spring or early summer, its fastest growing season. To prepare for replanting, volunteers on land bundle the shoots onto landscape staples, which SCUBA divers place into the sediment. Kern said the bed is being set at -8 feet: “Ideally we wanted to go shallower, but there wasn’t sufficient funding.”preparing eelgrass for planting

Nevertheless, Kern is excited that the second half of the restoration project is underway. “Three acres is a big project.” He noted that the restored area will be an important piece of the ongoing Puget Sound Partnership project to increase eelgrass habitat in the Sound 20 percent by 2020.

The $3 million Milwaukee Dock Eelgrass Restoration Project is funded in part by Wyckoff assets that were turned over to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Suquamish Tribe, one of the trustees overseeing Eagle Harbor cleanup efforts, obtained a crucial grant of $1.76 million to cover the lion’s share of the project. The money came from the Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration (PSAR) fund, an organization with a salmon restoration focus and broad ecological improvement objectives.preparing eelgrass for planting

Tom Ostrom, Salmon Recovery Coordinator for the Suquamish Tribe, pointed out the importance of the project for salmon recovery. “Chinook and Chum salmon in particular utilize near-shore eelgrass meadows in their early life span for feeding and as safe corridors for hiding from predators.”

Ostrom explained that the hope is the transplanted eelgrass will root in and spread throughout the bare areas. “The depth of these depressions is what has prevented eelgrass from growing. Because the surrounding eelgrass is so dense and so robust, it makes this site a prime candidate for restoration,” he said.preparing eelgrass for planting

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists will monitor the restoration site annually for at least five years to document how well the transplanted eelgrass is growing and to assess the overall success of the project.

Eelgrass Facts

  1. Eelgrass is a subtidal flowering plant.
  2. Eelgrass meadows are the base of numerous food webs.
  3. Eelgrass roots and rhizomes stabilize the seabed.
  4. Eelgrass meadows contribute crucial oxygen, both above and below the seabed.
  5. Eelgrass habitat is utilized for foraging, spawning, rearing, and as migration corridors by many commercially important fish and invertebrate species, marine mammals, and birds.
  6. Eelgrass mitigates ocean acidification by sequestering carbon.

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Lead photo courtesy of Paul Brians; eelgrass bundling photos courtesy of Tom Ostrom.

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Katie Vreedenburgh petting tigers in Thailand

BHS Grad in the Running to Host World Travel Series Needs Your Vote

Katie Vreedenburgh wants to show you the world. First she needs your vote to be chosen as the cohost of Global Degree, a web series featuring visits to the 195 countries of the United Nations.

The web show, recently picked up by the Discovery Channel, is set to begin its second season and looking for a female host to join the first season’s host Michael Graziano and videographer Alex Hennessey. Bainbridge High School graduate Vreedenburgh, 27, is in the running for the job, competing with 35 other young women for an adventure of several lifetimes and to share her travels with viewers.

Katie Vreedenburgh on Maui beach

Vreedenburgh in Maui

Vreedenburgh, who is currently working as a flight attendant, said she loves travel and is reaching out to her hometown of Bainbridge Island for votes to earn the role as cohost. “I’m not particularly interested in the fame aspect but more excited about the cultural experiences this opportunity would offer. People say there is a classroom and then a classroom of the world. I love the experience of meeting new people, seeing how they live, and putting myself out of my comfort zone.”

Vreedenburgh said she is excited that the show has decided to bring on a female cohost. “It’s a male-dominated field, and it shouldn’t be,” she told me. “Most travel shows are hosted by older men, often with a focus on food. We’re trying to focus on the culture and people.”

If Vreedenburgh is selected through popular vote (based on her video introduction), she would host the next five seasons of the show and become the youngest woman to visit all the UN countries, earning her a Guinness World Record. I asked her about the South American countries that have already been filmed, and she explained that the crew would go back and reshoot those locations with its female cohost.

Vreedenburgh in Quito, Ecuador

Vreedenburgh in Quito, Ecuador

View Vreedenburgh’s video here (scroll half way down the page to find her on the right). To vote for her, give her a Facebook “like” next to her video.

I asked her if she filmed her video on Bainbridge, and she said she happened to have a layover in Maui and had a friend help her shoot it there.

Global Degree has not set a date for the closing of the voting period, but Vreedenburgh has intel that it will be soon, so don’t wait to vote for the hometown girl.

Check out episodes of Global Degree here.

 

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Photos courtesy of Katie Vreedenburgh.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 1/18/15: Do It Your Way, Dammit

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

http://insidebainbridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/AW-Jan-18_25_2015.mp3

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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Photos of the Day: City Staff Turns Blue and Green

Bainbridge Island City staffers showed the love today for their Seahawks. Clad in blue and green and flying 12th man flags, everyone got in on the action in a show of solidarity in advance of this weekend’s Seahawks playoff game against the Green Bay Packers.

Both teams go into the postseason sporting a 13-4 record, with the Hawks enjoying home field advantage. Catch the game on Sunday, January 18, at 12:05 on FOX.

city staff seahawks fans

city staff seahawks fans
city staff seahawks fans
Photos by Julie Hall. 
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Mailboxes by Beate Meier

Letter to the Editor: The Sakai Property Is a Great Opportunity for a City Park!

Ten years ago when my husband and I made Bainbridge Island our home, it was the Island trees and open spaces that spoke to us. A few months ago we attended on one occasion a Parks & Recreation meeting and on another a City Council meeting with a desire to share at both a concern on our part. We understand the master plan for the Island encourages development and density in the center core. However, it seems there is no plan to capture parkland for quality of life issues. We were informed that there were insufficient funds for that purpose.

We are very pleased that the Park District has now shared with the public a proposal to purchase the 23-acre Sakai property across from Bainbridge schools and the Aquatic Center and a stone’s throw from the library. In the city core this is a welcome opportunity that will not come again. It should be noted that this proposal is unrelated to plans unfolding for the city-owned Suzuki property, which is in the area of the Bainbridge Island middle schools, not in the heart of the city.

We have been supporters from our first days here of the Bainbridge Island Land Trust. It is fortunate that dedicated members of our community have worked to set aside land for passive recreation, including walking trails and land that provides space and corridors for nature to continue to coexist with us.

The purchase of the Sakai property to add to our active recreational parkland would contribute to our lives on this Island in a very different fashion. We treasure the 90-plus acres that form Battle Point Park, a purchase made years ago that cannot be duplicated today. Such assets improve life for all of us on Bainbridge and, consequently, our property values.

Should this bond not receive sufficient voter support the property will most likely be sold for development of a totally different nature. It is important to note that the additional cost to the tax payers is quite negligible beyond what is currently on the books due to the low interest rates today and because the Park District has finished paying off the bonds for Gazzam and the Grand Forest.

February 10th, Election Day, is almost upon us, and we hope the voters will make an effort to inform themselves about this proposed purchase and give it the support it deserves.

—Svend and Edie Hartmann

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Letter to the Editor: A Look at the Taxpayer Cost of a Central Park in Winslow

Bainbridge Island has an exciting opportunity to purchase 23 acres of open space (the Sakai property) for a major new park in Winslow—the heart of our Island. Please vote YES on the ballot coming to your mailboxes around January 23. This is our last chance to save the last major undeveloped parcel in Winslow.

Of course, some people claim that the price is too high since it exceeds the current assessed value of the land. We urge voters to look at the facts and not be misled.

Assessed values vary widely from fair market value, particularly for large parcels of raw land. For example, just north of the Sakai property, Harrison Hospital recently purchased 3.02 acres assessed at $448,550. The price actually paid was $1,750,000—almost four times the assessed value. This is typical for raw land. The Sakai price was determined by an independent detailed MAI appraisal, which is the only accurate way to determine fair market value.

This park is clearly affordable. Prior bonds for Gazzam Lake and Grand Forest were paid off in 2014, so a “YES” vote on this measure will not cause any increase in your taxes over 2014 Parks District bond levies.

The actual cost of the bonds will be just 8 cents per $1,000 of assessed value—just $36 per year for a house assessed at $450,000.

Don’t let this special parcel become just another mega-housing development. Let’s create a central park in Winslow that we can all be proud of.

Bruce Weiland & Jason Shutt
Co-Chairs of People for Parks

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sunset pond by paul brians

Sun in January on Bainbridge: A Photo Log

by Paul Brians

Over in Eastern Washington where we used to live, we were warned that when we moved west we would have to endure endless stretches of days without sunshine. The fact that clear days aren’t common here in the winter makes their appearance all the more welcome. I’ve been documenting the sunny weather we’ve been experiencing the last few weeks to prove that all is not gray and bleak where we live.

I used my iPhone6+ to take all of the following photos, except for the the snowy mountain view, which I used my SLR to shoot.

Early morning sun in Battle Point Park.

Early morning sun in Battle Point Park.

A House facing west, viewed from the Skinner Road Road end.

A House facing west, viewed from the Skinner Road Road end.

As the temperature dived, this puddle froze, but the thawing bits reflected a deep blue sky.

As the temperature dived, this puddle froze, but the thawing bits reflected a deep blue sky.

The view west from the ferry.

The view west from the ferry.

sunset pond by paul brians

sunset pond by paul brians

Yes, it rains a lot; but even on a wet day the clouds can open to reveal a dramatic splash of blue sky.

Yes, it rains a lot; but even on a wet day the clouds can open to reveal a dramatic splash of blue sky.

The sun pierced the clouds briefly while drizzle continued to fall until I found this spectacular rainbow in Battle Point Park, nicely complemented by the horizontal stripes of vegetation below.

The sun pierced the clouds briefly while drizzle continued to fall until I found this spectacular rainbow in Battle Point Park, nicely complemented by the horizontal stripes of vegetation below.

This sunny morning in Battle Point Park the clouds looked as if they’d been whipped up by the bare tree branches.

This sunny morning in Battle Point Park the clouds looked as if they’d been whipped up by the bare tree branches.

Day breaking bright and clear over Eagle Harbor.

Day breaking bright and clear over Eagle Harbor.

From Hawley Cove, a ferry arriving as the rays of dawn lit the beach.

From Hawley Cove, a ferry arriving as the rays of dawn lit the beach.

A madrona tree at the tip of Arrow Point set ablaze by the morning sun.

A madrona tree at the tip of Arrow Point set ablaze by the morning sun.

Early morning shafts of sunlight in the Fairy Dell.

Early morning shafts of sunlight in the Fairy Dell.

The Olympic Mountains clear and bright in the transparent chilly air.

The Olympic Mountains clear and bright in the transparent chilly air.

In Battle Point Park, this tree was sharply lit against a brilliant blue sky.

In Battle Point Park, this tree was sharply lit against a brilliant blue sky.

Sunset clouds over the Battle Point Park duck pond.

Sunset clouds over the Battle Point Park duck pond.

Early morning sun in Battle Point Park.A House facing west, viewed from the Skinner Road Road end.As the temperature dived, this puddle froze, but the thawing bits reflected a deep blue sky.The view west from the ferry.sunset pond by paul briansYes, it rains a lot; but even on a wet day the clouds can open to reveal a dramatic splash of blue sky.The sun pierced the clouds briefly while drizzle continued to fall until I found this spectacular rainbow in Battle Point Park, nicely complemented by the horizontal stripes of vegetation below.This sunny morning in Battle Point Park the clouds looked as if they’d been whipped up by the bare tree branches.Day breaking bright and clear over Eagle Harbor.From Hawley Cove, a ferry arriving as the rays of dawn lit the beach.A madrona tree at the tip of Arrow Point set ablaze by the morning sun.Early morning shafts of sunlight in the Fairy Dell.The Olympic Mountains clear and bright in the transparent chilly air.In Battle Point Park, this tree was sharply lit against a brilliant blue sky.Sunset clouds over the Battle Point Park duck pond.

Photos by Paul Brians.

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 1/11/15: This Wall Is on Your Side

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

http://insidebainbridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/AW-Jan-11-to-18_2015-EDITTED.mp3.mp3

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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elf with putting puzzle pieces together

Elves on the Rocks: What the Controversy Is About

Elves on the Rock arose as a small group of people living on Bainbridge Island and/or connected with our community who gathered together to help raise funds to assist local residents in need during the holidays.

They solicited donation items from Bainbridge businesses and held an online auction to raise the funds, which they transferred into over $10,000 worth of gifts and gift cards and presented to 35 families on the Island before Christmas.

Since then the group of nine self-appointed “elves” has splintered. Those who track local Facebook groups may have read and/or heard about infighting among some of the group’s members, as well as others who by turns criticized and defended their actions and intentions. One faction, consisting of Sonny Oligario, is still using the name Elves on the Rock. The other faction, consisting of the other eight “elves” Jeff Adams, Karn Adams, Greg Beemer, Bonnie McBryan, Lisa Burns Schulze, Linda Keeney Thurrott, Joe Wettleson, and Sue Wilmot, is now calling itself Keep It on the Rock.

Jana Walker, lead administrator of the 3,700-member Facebook group Bainbridge Islanders, as well as Radio Free Bainbridge and Bainbridge Community Forum, said the forums’ administrators have suspended the members of both factions from participating on the forums because she is concerned about their legitimacy. “We are very wary of supporting these organizations that have split from disharmony and haven’t established with us that they are legitimate nonprofits,” she said. Walker added that she thought it was “odd” that during the holidays Elves on the Rock did not go through long-established Helpline House to choose charity recipients with vetted need.

According to an official statement on the Keep It on the Rock Facebook page, the eight members split from Oligario because he registered their campaign name of Elves on the Rock with the State of Washington without their knowledge and excluded them. They further stated that on December 20 Oligario redirected the collection of funds from the group’s PayPal account to another account under the registered name Elves on the Rock, which they do not have access to or knowledge of.

On Friday, January 9, the members of Keep It on the Rock delivered to Oligario a “cease and desist” letter requesting that he discontinue using the name “Elves on the Rock” to solicit donations and/or represent the group in any public capacity. The letter further asks Oligario, within 48 hours, to account for all contributions and donations he may have solicited under the name “Elves on the Rock.”

Oligario said he registered the domain name elvesontherock.com to collect the funds with the group’s knowledge. He said he did it because he “didn’t agree with how things were being done and didn’t know who was dealing with the money and how it [was] being divided. . . . When I presented to them that we need to do this right, Joe [Wettleson] wanted to have it go through the Paypal account. I’m a business man. Joe wants things his way,” said Oligario.

Jeff Adams said that when the original eight elves started their campaign they never dreamed they would raise the level of funds they did. He explained that none of them had done anything like it before and compared their initial vision to a school cookie drive to raise funds to take soup to families and give Christmas gifts to kids. Adams explained that he and his wife had an existing unused account at Kitsap Bank that they dedicated for collecting the funds. A retired CPA with extensive nonprofit experience, Adams said the group’s goals were so small that none of the members thought it was necessary to go through the paperwork of setting up a nonprofit organization.

The elves did a “flash drive” on Facebook among friends and ended up with nearly $13,000, “10 times what we expected,” said Adams.

“I’m upset that they’re saying I’m misappropriating funds,” said Oligario. “There were still a couple of thousand dollars left [after the campaign] that they gave to Linda at Best Western to use at her discretion. Why?”

I asked Adams about the extra money, and he said that it amounts to $2,500 and is sitting in the original account at Kitsap Bank until legal matters are settled with Oligario. He explained that as part of the disbursement of charitable funds, $200 went to Linda Thurrott, who often organizes charitable drives, to use for “emergent needs.”

Adams said, “We are very confident we vetted the families. We did what we intended to do with careful and fair accounting. Unfortunately we did not agree with one member and parted ways.” Adams emphasized that publicity and controversy were never any of the elves’ goals. “These are some of the kindest, most ethical, most thoughtful people I have ever had the pleasure to work with,” said Adams. About Oligario, he said, “It is clear to the eight remaining original founders that Mr. Oligario loves the community and is genuinely passionate about helping people. We wish him well in his pursuits.”

About the cease and desist letter, Oligario told me, “I’m not doing anything illegal, and that can be proven in a court of law. Go ahead and send a registered letter. Bring it all the way into court. Greg Beemer is stating on Facebook that since December 20th they have not had control of the website and that I may have been funneling the money into an account that they have no control over. I’m not soliciting any funds on the Internet. Any money that would come in I would return.”

Oligario explained that he has been quietly leaving food and gifts for people in need, particularly the elderly, for the last eight years, paying out of his own pocket and leaving things on their doorsteps anonymously. “I’m still going to do the same thing I’ve done. If people want to help, great. I’m not looking for recognition.”

Both groups said they are now pursuing nonprofit status. Beemer, of Keep It on the Rock, said that his group now realizes the need for greater transparency. He said the remaining eight members plan to pursue small charitable events throughout the year and hold another holiday campaign next winter. Currently they are organizing a Health and Hygiene Campaign to collect donations of toilet paper, diapers, and bath products for Helpline House.

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Photo courtesy of Mark Baylor

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fog at dusk by Marilynn Gottlieb

Photo-Poem of the Day for the Three People Not at the Seahawks Game

Thank you to award-winning photographer Marilynn Gottlieb for sharing this shot of a January evening on Bainbridge Island.

Marilynn’s photos are picturesque, but they also often tell a story. This photo “Ground Fog at Dusk” invites the viewer in to wonder who is home and what they might be doing or even thinking and feeling. Like a Robert Frost poem, it conveys loneliness and questioning, expressed with beauty and depth beyond its surface simplicity.

Marilynn sells her work as framed photos or as transfers onto metal plates. Visit her website to learn more.

fog at dusk by Marilynn Gottlieb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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puyallup ferry by Steve Voght

Another Person Jumps off Bainbridge Ferry

Washington Sate Ferries (WSF) has confirmed that a female passenger jumped from the Puyallup ferry today, January 10.

WSF spokesperson Susan Harris reported that the woman was on the 11:30 a.m. ferry from Bainbridge Island and jumped into the water at approximately noon as it was pulling into Seattle’s Colman Dock.

Authorities rescued the woman, and EMTs treated her at the scene.

This is the second instance in less than a week of a person jumping from a Bainbridge-to-Seattle ferry. Last Wednesday a 27-year-old man apparently attempted suicide by jumping off the 9:40 a.m. sailing.

We will provide further details as they become available.

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Photo courtesy of Steve Voght.

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Letter to the Editor: Vote Yes for Parks and Open Space Proposition 1

The Bainbridge Island Parks Foundation is an independent Island nonprofit that works closely with the Park District and other Island leaders to pursue our mission of “enhancing community by supporting a thriving system of parks, trails, and open space.” With this mission in mind, I speak for the organization to encourage support for the Winslow Park Bond vote in the upcoming February ballot.

The Sakai family presented the Bainbridge Island Metropolitan Park and Recreation District with the opportunity to acquire 23 acres of land on Madison Avenue across from the High School and Aquatic Center. This property includes 9 acres that could support active use and another 12 acres with a 2-acre lake for trails and open space. The ultimate design for the property would be determined through a public-input process after the election.

What we do know is that if the Bond does not receive 60% approval in the upcoming election, this land will not become public land, and is likely to be developed densely.

Few of us need to Google “positive impact of parks” to know how parks improve the quality of our lives. Research shows that parks are beneficial for the social, health, and economic aspects of a vibrant community. The Park District was created 50 years ago after the development of Rotary Park. Since then our park system has grown to 1,500 acres, enthusiastically embraced by the public. Our parks are our playgrounds, our woods and view corridors, facilitating recreation and preserving natural spaces. Parks add joy and serenity to our lives.

Ideally, everyone will live within a short walk to a park. This new park will be an oasis in the busy hub of Winslow, easily accessible to schools, library, pool, and shopping areas.

Vote yes for the bond and your taxes will not increase at all, as Grand Forest and Gazzam Lake bonds expired this month. Clearly, through those bonds the creation of both parks was a wonderful thing for our Island. These parks provide beloved trails and conserve woods and wetlands for wildlife and humans alike. They also significantly help to preserve our Island character—something much discussed these days in the ongoing City’s “Navigate Bainbridge” Comprehensive Plan update process.

Vote yes for Parks and Open Space Proposition 1 to save the last large parcel of undeveloped land in Winslow for parkland, as a lasting legacy to the Island.

Learn more about the Proposition at the Facebook page Park for Winslow.

Barb Trafton
Executive Director
Bainbridge Island Parks Foundation

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No Vacancy by bd

Kitsap County Report Shows Slight Land Capacity Deficit on Bainbridge

The (RCW 36.70A.215) requires Kitsap and five other counties to prepare a Buildable Lands Report (BLR). The Kitsap BLR draft, which was just released in December, is key to the County’s Comprehensive Plan update (due by June 2016). It shows whether the County and its Cities are achieving planned urban densities and if sufficient land is available to accommodate the next 20 years of residential and employment growth.

According to the BLR, Bainbridge is falling just a wee bit short in terms of land capacity.

Kitsap County worked with the Cities of Bainbridge Island, Bremerton, Port Orchard and Poulsbo to produce the BLR, which shows land capacities for residential, commercial, and industrial development. The BLR analysis compared existing buildable land capacity (converted to population growth capacity) with the forecast population growth for the planning period. The goal was to determine an estimated net growth capacity surplus or deficit and express the result as a ratio. According to the report, “That ratio can be viewed as a general indicator of how well the City is sized to accommodate its forecast population growth.”

The population of Bainbridge is expected to grow by 5,635 by 2035, an average annual population growth rate of .55 percent. But the BLR reports that the land capacity on Bainbridge is for only 5,542, giving us a capacity-to-demand ratio of 0.98.

According to the BLR, the population of Bainbridge grew between 2006 and 2012 by 870 people to 23,090. During that same period, the City of Bainbridge Island permitted 455 new single-family and 15 multi-family units. Single family units accounted for 96.8 percent of all new housing units permitted in the City. This indicates a reduction in multi-family units compared to the last report, something the report says is attributable to the Great Recession.

Over the seven years documented in the report, 550 acres of land were used for residential development in the City, half of that from the previous reporting period.

The County is accepting comments on the draft until January 31, 2015. The report is available here.  Click the Comments button on the right of the Comprehensive Plan Update page to comment.

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elves on the rock helpline house

Letter to the Editor: Elves on the Rock Holds Health & Hygiene Drive for Helpline House

Just barely two weeks before Christmas, a small group of Bainbridge Island community members joined together and formed “Elves on the Rock.” The goal of the group was to raise a few hundred dollars to meet the immediate needs of a couple of families at a local level. The Elves were looking to bring out the Christmas spirit of “paying it forward” to families that needed some help during the holidays.

As the number of families that were referred to the Elves for assistance grew, so did the donations received from Island businesses and the community. These quickly exceeded any of the group’s expectations at over $10,000 in donations and gifts. With this amazing outpouring of support, the Elves were able to help over 35 families.

The Elves would like to thank all the individuals and businesses that donated to the cause, participated in the online auction, and assisted with the collection, shopping, wrapping, and delivery of the gifts and everything else that made this event a HUGE success. The number of people reaching out to help was simply unbelievable. These folks truly understand the concept of paying it forward.

The Elves have committed to continue to help with the emergent needs of the community of Bainbridge Island, and this month are holding a Health and Hygiene Drive to assist Bainbridge Island Helpline House.

Find details on Facebook here.

—Elves on the Rock

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Astrology Weekly

Astrology Weekly 1/4/15: Face Your Addictions & Protective Repetitive Behaviors

Here is the latest Astrology Weekly audio chat by Bainbridge Island astrologer, counselor, and radio personality Aleta McClelland:

Listen here.

Aleta McClelland

Listen to Aleta’s weekly radio show, Aleta’s Audacity, on www.12radio.com Wednesdays at noon. You can also hear Aleta this week on Monday at noon on Tamara Childs’ show and Friday at noon as the guest of Lori Lines, both on www.12radio.com.

To make an appointment for a personalized astrological reading from Aleta, visit her website: acourseinconsciousness.com.

You can read more about Aleta in our article Aleta McClelland: Ace Astrologer.

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Richard McClelland.

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Letter to the Editor: A New Year’s Resolution for Bainbridge

With the recent injuries on Bainbridge Island roads it is time for all of us to make a New Year’s Resolution to make Bainbridge Island streets safe for all.

Walkers, wheelchair users, and bikers need to wear reflective clothing and flashing lights, especially at night.
Motorists, please slow down when passing a bicyclist or pedestrian, instead of speeding up. Car speed is the most important factor in whether a pedestrian or bicyclist survives in a collision. Nine out of ten pedestrians or bicyclists survive if the speed is under 20 miles per hour.  At 40 miles an hour, one out of ten survives.
Did you know that the speed limit on Winslow is 15 miles per hour—not 25 or 30?
The speed limit on Madison is 25 miles per hour. The speed limit on Wyatt driving down the hill from Grow is also 25 miles per hour—not 35.
Grow Avenue is a popular road for high school students to walk after school. Most of the road has no sidewalk—please slow down!
We have multiple secondary roads with no shoulder; some of those roads are 35-40 miles per hour. There are many walkers and bikers on those roads. Why are our road speeds so high? (Sunrise, Eagle Harbor Drive, and Peterson are examples.)
Remember when you decide to pass a school bus that has stopped to let children out, not only are you breaking the law, but you may be injuring or killing one of your neighbor’s children.
The many people who bike and walk on Bainbridge Island are school teachers, doctors, lawyers, nurses, landscapers, ferry captains, electrical engineers, Bainbridge Striders, school children, artists, shop keepers, wheelchair hiking group members, trainers, retirees, and many others. They are your friends and neighbors.
Let’s make 2015 the year Bainbridge Island lowered speeds and made it safe for all.
Patty Lyman
Winslow
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Kitsap County Courthouse

Accused Bainbridge Assailant Booked for Attempted Murder

The Bainbridge Island man arrested for allegedly attacking two women on December 15 behind the Doctors Clinic is now facing the additional felony charge of Attempted Murder.

According to court documents, Adrian Allan Charvet, 25, was arrested for attacking his 50-year-old cellmate in Kitsap County Jail at approximately 11:30 a.m. yesterday, January 1, 2015. Inside their locked cell, Charvet allegedly began beating the victim on the head with his fists, attempted to gouge out the man’s eyes, and then began to strangle him with his bare hands.

Corrections officers were alerted to the scuffle and intervened. After being advised of his Miranda rights, Charvet said he had intended to kill his cellmate and would have done so had he not been stopped.

The victim had neck trauma consistent with strangulation and also suffered trauma to his eyes. He stated that he could not breathe and felt as if his eyeballs were bulging out of his head. He believed he would have died without intervention.

Bail for the Attempted Murder charge has been set at $500,000.

Charvet was arrested on December 15 on charges of assault, with bail set at $50,000, after a several-hour standoff with the Kitsap County SWAT team.

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storyville winslow

After 3 Years Still Nothing Brewing in Winslow’s Empty Storyville Site

Entering into a new year, a rather gaping question persists about Winslow: What’s the Storyville with the empty business space in the center of our downtown?

Formerly Winslow Hardware and Port Madison Home, the prime 6,000-square-foot Bainbridge Island real estate was purchased in late 2011 for $1.6 million by Storyville owners Islander Jon Phelps, Kris Rosentrater, and Jamie Munson. The three founded the coffee company on Bainbridge in 2006.

For over three years the Winslow storefront has remained shut tight, sealed with brown paper and sporting the merest signage hinting at something to come.

But what is to come and when? Inside Bainbridge asked those questions in October of 2013, with inconsistent responses and no time frame provided (read more here).

Bainbridge Chamber of Commerce head Rex Oliver asked Storyville the same questions, to no avail. Oliver said he has had no contact with the company for some two years. “I think it would be in the best interests of the community and downtown for them to either develop the very large dormant area or relinquish ownership and put it back on the market so others have an opportunity,” he said.

Storyville warehouse on BI

Storyville warehouse on BI

Bainbridge Downtown Association head Jerri Lane agreed with Oliver. She visited the Storyville coffee roasting warehouse headquarters in Coppertop Loop about a month ago to ask about the company’s plans for the Winslow site. No owners were available to speak with. She said a very nice young man told her the plans were undergoing “a design and feasibility study. He indicated that it would be a coffee and food place but did not say when it might open.”

Lane expressed a desire to have the company work with downtown to make the site less of an eyesore, asking the young man if they would decorate the storefront for the holidays. “He said they would, but nothing was done.” After reminders and more promises, still nothing materialized and, as Lane put it, the “hole” in downtown has sat dark and unadorned through the holidays.

Lane said, “their roasting facility warehouse is beautiful. It is decorated with large gorgeous dioramas. It could be like Costco, but when you’re in there you realize the owners have an aesthetic sense and interest. I suggested putting some of the art in the windows of the Winslow location. We’d love to have them devote some of that energy into downtown.”

Lane said downtown business owners raise the issue of the empty Storyville space at every Downtown Association meeting. “Everybody is scratching their heads. It doesn’t contribute to an attractive business experience, and there is no communication. It’s a big mystery,” said Lane. “Three email blasts later we still have brown paper.”

“If there could be an outreach it would mean a lot to the community,” continued Lane. “This is the U.S. of A., they can do whatever they want, but in a close-knit community it sticks out like a sore thumb. . . . Our downtown mission is to promote local, individually owned businesses and keep the streetscape as attractive as possible. Having a big blank does not contribute to an attractive streetscape or inspire confidence in visitors and shoppers. It does not convey economic vibrancy; it conveys something quite different,” she said. “Our mission is to keep a vibrant, economically healthy, and appealing downtown. It’s difficult with such a large empty space we clearly have no control over. Let’s get on it or get off.”

City of Bainbridge Communications Specialist Kelly Stickney echoed the sentiments of Oliver and Lane: “The city is very interested in talking with Storyville. I have tried to make contact with them on multiple occasions without success.”

Lisa Wangen, owner of Bon Bon, which sits next door to the empty Storyville site, said “people want to see something active, lit up, and lively. Customers would like to see life in there and a sense of community and activity. We get so many people asking us what’s going on. I just love Winslow and life on it.”

Storyville T shit "Love Everybody"

Storyville T-shirt

When Inside Bainbridge called Storyville again for comment about their plans, we were told by the person who answered the phone that there is nothing to report about the Winslow site. When we asked for her name, she transferred us to another person, who said he would contact the owners and “hopefully” they would get back to us. After two more attempts at contact, we have yet to hear from them.

In recent years Storyville has been busy launching three upscale cafes in Seattle, one downtown, one in Pike Place, and one in Queen Anne. Its alleged associations with the controversial Mars Hill Church have dogged the company, particularly in the last year as Mars Hill Pastor Mark Driscoll drew increasing criticism for inflammatory misogynist and gay-bashing rhetoric. The Stranger reported in September that Storyville owner Jon Phelps was joining the Mars Hill Board. A previous Stranger article reported that Storyville copresident Munson is a former executive pastor of Mars Hill, and copresident Rosentrater, who runs the Bainbridge roasting house, played on an album released by Mars Hill.

Inside Bainbridge would like to ask Storyville, which sports phrases such as “Love Everybody” on its product line, if “everybody” includes women, lesbians, gays, people who do not worship Jesus Christ, and residents and business owners of Bainbridge Island. According to an article this week in The Seattle Times, since Driscoll’s resignation under fire in October, Mars Hill disbanded this month and renamed itself Cross & Crown Church. Will Storyville remain tied to the reincarnation of Mars Hill?

What’s the story, Storyville?

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