Author Archives | redhare

IB's Top 10 Stories

IB’s Top 10 Stories in July 2014

Here are the 10 most-read articles Inside Bainbridge published during July, 2014, in descending order:

  1. WSF Has a Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
  2. Both Directions of Seattle-Bainbridge Island Ferry Service Suspended
  3. Hammy’s: Lynwood Center’s New Old-Style Hamburger Joint
  4. Bainbridge’s New Stone Mosaic ‘Labyrinth’ Is a Tour de Force (w/ Photo Gallery)
  5. Bainbridge Procession Wednesday for Island-Raised Firefighter Joe Kane
  6. Joe Kane Returns Home with Procession of Firefighters, Friends, and Family
  7. Driver Airlifted to Seattle After Crashing on Highway 305 at Vineyard Lane
  8. The Second Voyage of Cafe Trios: New Owners Try Their Luck on Land
  9. The Sharks Among Us in Puget Sound and Jawesome Factoids
  10. Bainbridge Grand Old Fourth 2014 Photo Gallery

Related Stories

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in IB's Top Ten Stories, Inside Bainbridge News, News, Slider0 Comments

kids with blueberry buckets

Get Sweet Summer Fatties Now at the Bainbridge Island Blueberry Farm

What could be finer than a bucketful of plump berries and a bright bouquet that you’ve harvested yourself in the sun at a local farm?

Bainbridge Island Blueberry Co. on N. Madison Avenue has begun keeping u-pick hours for the start of what owner Stacy Lewars said is promising to be the farm’s best season yet, thanks to the warm, sunny weather we’ve been getting. “The plants are loaded with fruit,” said Lewars.

Lewars opened the farm gates for limited hours last week, a week earlier than usual. With four varieties of blueberry that ripen at different times, the farm typically has good picking from late July through midSeptember, with August being the height of the harvest.

Currently Lewars is staggering her open days to give her fruit the time it needs to sweeten, so customers should check Bainbridge Island Blueberry Co.’s facebook page or call its hotline at 206-855-0947 for up-to-date information about its open days and times.

Dahlias!

dahlias at bainbridge island blueberry coAccording to Lewars, the farm’s dahlias have been going strong since June. People can stop by any time and take self-cuttings for $5/dozen. When the farm is closed, payment is by the honor system.

Lewars said the dahlias are a popular and affordable option for garden parties and weddings. Already this season the farm has supplied flowers for three weddings.

Related Stories

Photos by Julie Hall.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Community, Farming, Slider0 Comments

Tokitae ferry

Yet Another Boat Down—Seriously—Adds to Ferry Woes

The Tokitae ferry, which serves the Mukilteo/Clinton route, was pulled from service today, July 30, for “necessary repairs.” Without a specific explanation, Washington State Ferries (WSF) canceled the 2 p.m. departure from Clinton and the 2:30 p.m. departure from Mukilteo, saying it will provide updates when available.

The brand new Tokitae had only been running in the WSF system for one month, launched June 30, 2014. The boat holds 144 cars and travels between Clinton in northwest Whidbey Island and Mukilteo north of Everett.

The removal of the Tokitae from service is one more blow to an already depleted WSF, which suffered the sudden break down of the Seattle/Bainbridge Island vessel Tacoma yesterday at a time when the route’s other boat, the Wenatchee, is in Vancouver, B.C., for repairs until nest week.

There is currently lowered capacity service on the Seattle/Bremerton route, and there is one-boat service between Edmonds and Kingston as well as between Mukilteo and Clinton.

WSF has not yet provided a definitive reason for yesterday’s power failure on the Tacoma, which required assistance from two tugboats, threw the Seattle/Bainbridge route into temporary chaos, and burdened nearby runs with limited service.

Related Stories

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in News, Slider, Transportation0 Comments

Tacoma ferry out of service

Tacoma Still Down, but Two-Boat Service Resumes Wednesday for Seattle-Bainbridge

Washington State Ferries (WSF) has announced that the Seattle/Bainbridge route will return to a two-boat schedule when the Puyallup ferry moves into position with the 5:20 a.m. sailing from Bainbridge Island tomorrow, Wednesday, July 30.

WSF said it will provide updates on the service crisis throughout the day tomorrow. It has not provided a status report regarding why the Tacoma ferry lost power on the 12:20 sailing from Seattle today, nor when the boat will return to service.

Revised One-Boat Seattle/Bainbridge Schedules for Tonight

  • Seattle to Bainbridge: 10:05 p.m., 12:15 a.m., 1:35 a.m.
  • Bainbridge to Seattle: 8:55 p.m., 11:35 p.m., 12:55 a.m.

Revised Edmonds/Kingston Schedule for Wednesday

Walla Walla

Walla Walla departing BI

The 202-vehicle-capacity Puyallup normally services the Edmonds/Kingston run. The route will be on a one-boat schedule for Wednesday. The Spokane will provide service on this route. WSF reports the following sailings schedule:

  • Kingston to Edmonds: 4:55 a.m., 6:25 a.m., 7:55 a.m., 9:40 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 12:50 p.m.
  • Edmonds to Kingston: 5:35 a.m., 7:10 a.m., 8:50 a.m.,10:30 a.m.,12:05 p.m.

Related Stories

Photos by Julie Hall.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.7/5 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

Posted in New 1, News, Transportation0 Comments

Tacoma ferry pushed by tugboats in Puget Sound

WSF Has a Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

[Read the update to this story.]

Whether you’re a vessel-half-empty or a vessel-half-full kind of person, it’s difficult to deny that Washington State Ferries (WSF) is having a pretty bad day. Striking at the heart of its highest annual ridership during a year that is shaping up to be its busiest ever, WSF’s two largest boats are suddenly out cold on the same day.

Riders were already taking a hit today, July 29, with the Wenatchee pulled out of service and sitting on a dry dock up in Vancouver, B.C., for a week of needed repairs. It looked like the Seattle/Bremerton run was to get the biggest lump by losing its second-largest-class boat, the Walla Walla, to fill in for the Wenatchee, getting in its place the relatively dinky Sealth. Bainbridge ferry traffic

But as fate would have it the big Tacoma mysteriously lost power today on its way from Seattle to Bainbridge on the 12:20 p.m. sailing.

Two tugs retrieved the stranded ship, pushed it to the Bainbridge terminal to unload, and then nudged it over to the Eagle Harbor Repair Facility at about 4 p.m., where members of the Coast Guard joined the WSF repair crew to assess the problem and figure a fix, something that WSF says they are still working on.

WSF is advising riders to use the notoriously overloaded Edmonds/Kingston ferries, Bremerton is running late because the little Sealth sailed to assist (to no avail) the Tacoma, those counting on the Seattle/Bainbridge route are enduring grueling waits, and the 2,000-passenger-capacity Walla Walla ferry servicing Seattle/Bainbridge is only taking 600 passengers at a time because of federal regulations that require reduced ridership when there is not a backup boat available in case of emergency.WSF Eagle Harbor Repair Facility

Connections were missed, appointments were broken, people were hot, bored, tired, cross, and unfresh. Best laid plans were cast to the wind. And it’s not over. People are still waiting, with no answers yet forthcoming.

Vessel Half Full: On a positive note, it appears that nobody really got hurt, and that is a reason to take a breath and be thankful.

Read the update to this story.

Related Stories

Photos by Julie Hall. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.3/5 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 3 votes)

Posted in New 2, News, Slider, Transportation3 Comments

View from the Tacoma by Tim Wilson @timwilson626

Stranded Tacoma Being Hauled to Bainbridge Terminal; One-Boat Service to Resume

The 202-vehicle-capacity Tacoma ferry that lost power in Eagle Harbor near Rockaway Beach is now being transported by two tug boats to the Bainbridge Island terminal, where it will unload its passengers and vehicles.

Washington State Ferries (WSF) has announced it will run a single ferry, the 188-car-capacity Walla Walla, to service both directions of the Seattle-Bainbridge route for the time being.

WSF strongly recommends that commuters take the Edmonds-Kingston ferry.

View from the Tacoma by Tim Wilson @timwilson626

View from the Tacoma by Tim Wilson @timwilson626

Related Stories

Photos courtesy of @TimWilson626. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Emergencies, News, Popular 3, Transportation2 Comments

WA ferry

Both Directions of Seattle-Bainbridge Island Ferry Service Suspended

[Read the update to this breaking story.]

The Tacoma 12:20 p.m. ferry heading from Seattle to Bainbridge Island lost power at approximately 12:45 near Rockaway Beach before arriving at its destination. The boat dropped anchor and waited for assistance. Foss Tugboat Company dispatched a rescue tug to transport the Tacoma to the Bainbridge terminal to unload its passengers. The boat is carrying 405 passengers and 138 vehicles. They will be offloaded at slip 2 of the Bainbridge terminal.

Washington State Ferries spokesperson Marta Coursey said WSF does not yet know the reason for the power loss.

A tugboat reached the stranded ferry at about 1:50 p.m. A second tug arrived to assist at about 2 p.m.

WSF diverted the Sealth ferry from its run from Bremerton to Seattle to assist with the Tacoma. The Sealth is now on its way to Seattle.

All service between Bainbridge and Seattle is suspended for at least the 1:30, 2:55, and 4:35 departures from Bainbridge and the 2:05, 3:45, and 5:30 from Seattle.

Because the Sealth was diverted, Seattle-Bremerton service has been disrupted. The 12:20 and possibly the 3:00 out of Bremerton, and the 1:30 and maybe the 4:20 out of Seattle are delayed.

The Wenatchee was pulled out of service last night for a week of repairs, leaving the fleet at already lowered capacity.

Read the update to this breaking story.

Related Stories

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 3.7/5 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

Posted in Don't Miss This 2, Emergencies, News, Transportation2 Comments

Westie Walkers

Photo of the Day: Westie Walk

A pack of button-cute Westies (West Highland White Terriers) gathered with their people yesterday, July 27, at Bainbridge Island’s Battle Point Park (BPP) for their weekly Westie Walk. The Westie lovers explained that the breed especially enjoys the company of its kind.

A loose group of Westies and friends meets each Sunday at about 11 a.m. at BPP to walk.

 

Photo by Julie Hall. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Animals, Outside, Parks+Trails, Popular 10 Comments

earthquake

Close Quake Jangles Bainbridge Early This Morning

A 3.5 earthquake centered about 3 miles east of Belfair and 13 miles southwest of Bainbridge Island at 4:04 a.m. today, July 28, jarred area residents awake. People on Bainbridge reported feeling their houses shake and furniture move.

According to data from the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, the earthquake, 15.6 miles deep, was the highest magnitude one in our vicinity since the 3.5 quake that struck Poulsbo on December 5, 2013.

Related Stories

Map courtesy of Pacific Northwest Seismic Network.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.0/5 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +3 (from 3 votes)

Posted in Community, Don't Miss This 3, Environment, News1 Comment

plover by Jay Wiggs

Name That Bird: And the Oscar Goes to . . .

Unlike most shorebirds, this graceful slender-winged plover is often seen on dry land, where it may make its nest and hunt for worms and insects. Whether on the beach or in a field or lawn, this bird is quite the thespian, darting about, calling shrilly (the source of its name), and even sometimes feigning a broken wing to distract potential predators from its nest site on the ground.

Common on Bainbridge Island, these birds live on our shores, open parkland, and some backyards.

plover, by Jay Wiggs

plover, by Jay Wiggs

Can you name this master of the art of distraction?

Related Stories

broken wing act

Broken wing act at Battle Point Park, by Julie Hall

Eggs as Battle Point Park

Eggs as Battle Point Park, by Julie Hall

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

Posted in Animals, Slider, Wildlife Watch2 Comments

elevated trail

$3.5M Raised to Get Bainbridge Leg of Visionary Sound to Olympics Trail Moving

Imagine this: taking a safe, stress-free bike ride or walk along Bainbridge Island’s main transit artery, Highway 305. Sound radically beyond your risk-taking nature or ability level?

The mild-mannered but tenacious architect of this idea, 40-year Bainbridge Island resident Don Willott, says the separated trail with a vegetation buffer is decidedly not just for commuters or the lycra-clad peloton. The multiuse, family-friendly trail is meant to draw all kinds who wish to move sans automobile from the ferry to the bridge or from anyplace to anyplace in between those two points—and beyond.

It is also the crucial start point of the Sound to Olympics Trail, an ambitious “complete streets” regional paved trail that someday soon will be a cherished feature of the Kitsap Peninsula for locals and visitors alike.

The good news is the City of Bainbridge Island’s (COBI) Non-Motorized Transportation Committee, with dedicated leadership from Willott and close collaboration with City Engineering Manager Chris Hammer, has thus far secured an impressive $3.5 million in state funding to design and build the trail from the ferry gateway up to High School Road.

There is more work to be done to fund the rest of the trail up to Agate Pass Bridge. But to talk with Willott about the painstaking research, planning, grant-writing, and collaborative work involved in getting this far is to understand what a feat it is that our small municipality has earned so much financial support in a very competitive field of worthy state-wide projects.

You’re Invited to the July 30 Meeting

On Wednesday, July 30, the COBI Public Works Department is hosting a public meeting at 7 p.m. at City Hall in the Council Chamber to present three designs of the first leg of the Bainbridge portion of the trail, extending from the ferry gateway to Vineyard Lane. The designs are in part the result of input from a public meeting held last October.

Ferry commuters photo courtesy of Don Willott

Bainbridge Island ferry commuters

The current proposed project provides for the construction of approximately 0.37 miles of separated pathway to complete this first segment of the trail. Proposed design features include a non-motorized pathway and/or sidewalk widening, accessibility improvements, bike lanes or shared lanes, painted bike boxes, center divider curbing, street lighting improvements, signal modifications, and landscaping.

During the meeting, the City will present conceptual drawings of the three possible designs and seek public input to use to develop the final design, which is required to be built in 2015. View the three designs here

I asked Willott what has motivated him to devote so much time and energy to the project—some 15 years so far. He said some years back growth on the Island was making his running routes unsafe, and, after retiring from his job as a psychiatric social worker, he decided, “I could be miserable or do something about it.”

Related Stories

Ferry commuters photo courtesy of Don Willott.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Dont Miss This 4, Government, Outside, Parks+Trails2 Comments

walla walla ferry

Seattle/ Bainbridge Ferry Service Gets Priority but Possible Bremerton Overflow with Wenatchee Down

Washington State Ferries (WSF) is removing its 202-car Wenatchee ferry, which serves the Seattle/Bainbridge route, for approximately one week starting Tuesday, July 29, for necessary repairs to the vessel’s stern tube seals.

As WSF’s most-populous run, Seattle/Bainbridge will receive highest priority for a replacement vessel during the absence of the Wenatchee. Bremerton’s 188-car Walla Walla ferry will temporarily replace the Wenatchee, and the 90-car Sealth will serve in place of the Walla Walla on the Seattle/Bremerton route.

Travelers on the Seattle/Bainbridge route should be prepared for delays from possible overflow resulting from the substantially reduced Seattle/Bremerton service.

WSF also advises travelers on the Seattle/Bainbridge/Bremerton routes to plan for heavy traffic on Saturday, July 26, due to Seattle’s Seafair Torchlight Run and Parade. According to WSF, “Vehicles and passengers may experience delays departing from and arriving to Colman dock due to the event.”

Related Stories

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Don't Miss This 2, News, Transportation1 Comment

Bainbridge Iron Man Dad Chosen for Pyrenees Tour de France Charity Challenge

When Bainbridge Islander Darren Smith started training for an Iron Man triathlon to raise money for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), an organization that helped make life-saving medicine available for his daughter, he thought it was enough to get off the couch, jump on the bike, and cut back on beer and hash browns. After over a year of Kafkaesque metamorphosis, Smith is a different man but still the same dedicated dad with the same goal of giving back to the charity that helped save the life of his infant daughter—now a sassy, talented teen.

On August 3 Smith, 49, will finally face his long-sought challenge of becoming an Iron Man, a real-life status Hollywood can not actually confer. To complete the triathlon-of-triathlons event, held in Boulder, Smith will swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles, and run a marathon distance of 26.2 miles in a span of no longer than 17 hours.

Darren Smith with his daughter Meghan

Darren Smith with his daughter Meghan

As if transforming into an iron butterfly weren’t enough, Smith has been selected by the international human resources firm he works for, Adecco, to participate in their annual worldwide athletic fundraising event. Each year the company chooses 70 people from its global team for a children’s charity event. This year the charity is Win4Youth, and the athletic event is a bike ride of a lifetime—the 18th leg of the Tour de France.

Luckily for Smith, biking is his favorite triathlon event. But, despite the considerable workout of having trained on Bainbridge Island hills, Smith is still in mental shock about what he calls the Pyrenees Mountains version of 10 miles straight up Baker Hill.

Don’t feel too sorry for him; he will, after all, be in France for five days, expenses paid, staying in Lourdes, where he and the other riders will divide their time between a few days of training, the actual ride on August 30, and sightseeing and parties. About the “Col du Tourmalet” uphill climb, Smith said, “My two goals are not to get off the bike and to finish smiling.”

Darren and Lynn Smith

Darren and Lynn Smith

Related Stories

Photos by Julie Hall.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Community, Popular 5, Sports1 Comment

rain and cloud break by Joyce Rudolph

Weather: Sun and Warm Temps on the Way, Really

The National Weather Service reports that we will see a break from the gloom starting Friday, which will usher in normal summer sun and temperatures climbing back where they belong.

Here is the forecast for Bainbridge Island:

Thursday A 40 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 69 degrees F. South wind 5 to 7 mph.
Thursday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 55 degrees F. North-northeast wind 5 to 10 mph becoming light and variable after midnight.
Friday Partly sunny, with a high near 72 degrees F. Calm wind becoming north-northeast around 6 mph in the afternoon.
Friday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 55 degrees F. Northeast wind 6 to 8 mph.
Saturday Sunny, with a high near 77 degrees F. North-northeast wind 5 to 9 mph.
Saturday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 56 degrees F.
Sunday Sunny, with a high near 81 degrees F.
Sunday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 55 degrees F.
Monday Sunny, with a high near 82 degrees F.
Monday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 55 degrees F.
Tuesday Sunny, with a high near 80 degrees F.
Tuesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 55 degrees F.
Wednesday Sunny, with a high near 80 degrees F

Photo courtesy of Bainbridge Island photographer Joyce Rudolph. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in News, Slider, Weather0 Comments

eagle and crow on boat

Photos of the Day: Pelagic Pirates?

Islander Thomas Hayward shared this shot of “pirates” aboard his boat moored just north of Bainbridge Island’s Battle Point.

It’s a rare occasion when eagles and crows coexist, which begs the question, who is the captain and who is the lookout?

Here are photos of a crow harassing a beleaguered bald eagle, by wildlife photographer and Inside Bainbridge contributor Jay Wiggs.

crow and eagle by jay wiggs

crow and eagle by jay wiggs

 

 

 
crow and eagle by jay wiggs

 

 

 

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Don't Miss This 1, Features, Photo of the Week0 Comments

Kitsap County Sheriff patrol car

Kingston Man Arrested for Alleged Murder of His Infant Daughter

A Kingston man has been arrested and booked in jail on a charge of second-degree murder of his four-month-old daughter.

Kitsap Sheriff’s detectives took the 21-year-old accused man into custody yesterday, July 21, after establishing probable cause, and bail was set at $1 million.

According to the Sheriff’s report, the baby was rushed by a North Kitsap Fire & Rescue medic unit to Harrison Medical Center following a 911 call on July 17 just after midnight. The caller reported that she had stopped breathing. Medics responded to an apartment in the 26200 block of Central Avenue NE in Kingston. The baby was later transferred to Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital in Tacoma, where she died on July 18.

The serious nature of the child’s condition prompted medics to contact detectives, who launched an immediate investigation.

Hospital attending physicians said the baby girl sustained injuries consistent with “Shaken Baby Syndrome.” Further examination of the infant revealed that she had a fractured rib, hemorrhaging at the back of her head, bruising in her lower abdomen, and a perforated colon caused by blunt force trauma.

Sheriff’s detectives believe the infant’s fatal injuries were sustained while she was in the custody of her father.

Photo by Julie Hall.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Crime, News0 Comments

bantam rooster at Church garden

The Flap About Rooster Dumping and Ethical Urban Farming

In the last week members of the Eagle Harbor Congregational Church community garden in Winslow have reported incidents of roosters being left in their garden. The large fenced garden is a beautiful sprawling area with dozens of well-tended beds and a chicken coop.

Several days ago members discovered a small Bantam rooster in the garden hanging around the coop. Concerned for his safety, they attempted to integrate him into the coop, but the presiding resident chickens attacked him, nearly fatally, so community members released him back in the open garden.

A few days later another unknown chicken was found in the garden, its carcass picked clean by a predator. Angered and concerned, Maradel Gale, one of the community gardeners, posted about the incidents on the online forum Bainbridge Islanders late Sunday night, July 20, concluding with, “PLEASE DO NOT DUMP YOUR UNWANTED ANIMALS!!”

Oops, It’s a Boy

I asked Gale if she could confirm that the carcass was a rooster, and she said given its state she could not but that common sense would dictate that it was another dumped rooster. Indeed rooster dumping is not new. With the rising popularity of urban chicken farming, there are more roosters than people know what to do with since chick sexing (gender identifying) can be unreliable.

Rooster dumping is a big pet peeve of Edmonds-based urban homesteading writer and founder of Northwest Edible Life Erica Strauss. Strauss told me, “Rooster dumping is an obscene practice where people basically don’t know what to do with a rooster so they abandon it. Sometimes the rooster becomes a “midnight gift” to some unsuspecting neighbor, or it might get dumped in a park or along the side of a road. I talked to one lady who watched a car in front of her on the freeway pull over onto the shoulder and release a rooster out of a box. The woman I talked to pulled over to try to catch the rooster, but at that point it was so frightened she couldn’t get it. You have to stop and think, what’s the likely fate of a rooster let loose next to a major freeway?”

bantam rooster at Church garden

Bantam rooster perched next to the church garden coop

Several years ago this writer observed a rooster dropped out of a car on Bainbridge Island’s Miller Road, where it flapped around in disoriented distress in heavy traffic. With help I was able to capture the abandoned rooster and find a home for him in a local coop.

Strauss continued: “People raised in a rural, farm environment with livestock tend to be comfortable slaughtering and sending roosters to “freezer camp,” but that’s not necessarily part of the urban experience, and it can be uncomfortable. So honestly, I think a lot of urban chicken keepers who find themselves with an unexpected rooster don’t know what to do, and they just panic. They try to make it someone else’s problem.”

Aging Hens

The fact that chicks sometimes grow into roosters isn’t the only thing many urbanites don’t consider when they undertake chicken keeping. Strauss pointed out that people don’t always think about the reality that hens typically outlive their fertility, often by several years. “It’s crucial to decide up front if your chickens are pets or livestock. If they are pets, you are responsible for appropriately caring for them until their eventual natural death, which could be 10 years from when you adopt cute little fluffy chicks. And for most of that time period, your hens won’t lay very many eggs; after about 3 years, the egg production of an average hen really declines. If the chickens are pets, that’s not a big deal. Responsible people don’t dump other pets because they get older. But if they are livestock and their role is to provide you with eggs, compost, and insect control, you have to have a plan to refresh your flock. That plan will probably involve slaughtering your birds, or selling them to people who will slaughter them. That’s the reality and it’s important that people understand it before they come home from the feedstore with a box full of peepers,” said Strauss.

Moral Issues of Chicken Rearing

IMG_2004

Bantam rooster in church garden bed

As for purchasing chicks, most people don’t consider the industrial system behind the scenes, which produces some 50 percent male hatchlings for which there is virtually no market. Strauss explained that male hatchlings are literally thrown into a trash can unless they are mistaken for females and sold off.

As for chicken keepers dumping unwanted juvenile or adult chickens, she said, “My personal take is that dumping roosters or old hens is about the least ethical way to manage your flock. These are domesticated animals. They aren’t wild creatures, and their fate when not under human care is typically to become dinner for a raccoon or a dog or a fox. I also have a real issue with people who deliberately set up their own personal alternate food system by bringing in animals to their property and then try to dump those animals on someone else when their perceived usefulness is over.”

Are Roosters Legal on Bainbridge?

According to Bainbridge Island municipal code, both hens and roosters are legal to keep outside of Mixed Use Town Center areas, which are confined to the small commercial zones around immediate Winslow, the ferry gateway, High School Road, Fletcher Bay, Rolling Bay, and Lynwood Center (see BI’s municipal zoning map showing Mixed Use Town Centers in red, pink, and purple). In other words, people who keep roosters are well within their rights on residential Bainbridge Island. (The Church’s Winslow garden has grandfathered-in permission to keep chickens.)

What to Do with an Unwanted Cockadoodledoo

If you don’t want to keep or eat your rooster, there are a few options. Melissa Byrd of the Kitsap Humane Society, in Silverdale, said the organization takes roosters, along with dogs, cats, rabbits, and other animals, for adoption. Bainbridge Island’s West Sound Wildlife Shelter (WSWS) will take roosters to feed to its carnivores. Because it takes time and money to euthanize a rooster, WSWS asks that people make a donation of $20 when they drop off an unwanted bird.

What About the Bantam Rooster?

Wondering about the fate of the loose Banty? Currently he is safe in this writer’s chicken coop.

Related Stories

Photos by Julie Hall. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Animals, Coop Scoop, Popular 42 Comments

Virginia Mason listening tree

Chirp up in Virginia Mason’s Listening Trees Around Winslow

Bainbridge Island’s mainstay medical center Virginia Mason (VM) wants you to know they are listening. They invite you to join their “healthy community conversation” by adding your thoughts to “listening trees” that they have installed at their clinic at 380 Winslow Way East, as well as at Winslow Green, Winslow Mall, Waterfront Community Center, and the Waterfront Park stage.

Citizens can fill out tags on the trees to complete statements such as, “I value my health so I can . . .,” “I am inspired by . . .,” and “My words I live by are . . . .” The trees will be on display through Labor Day and then donated to the City of Bainbridge Island.

Virginia Mason Bainbridge Island Medical Center Director Andrew Baylor calls the new campaign, “a fun way for everyone to express themselves and be part of an exciting summer event in our community. This is much bigger than health care. We’re convening a conversation across the community about living well that gets more interesting with each person’s voice.”

Virginia Mason listening tree

Message on Winslow Green listening tree

Founded in 1920, Virginia Mason is a nonprofit regional health care system that serves the Puget Sound area. Its Winslow medical center offers a range of primary and specialty services, including cardiology, orthopedics, hematology-oncology, digital mammography, and endocrinology. VM’s Bainbridge Island team works with its eight other medical centers in the region and its acute-care hospital in Seattle.

Learn more about Virginia Mason at their website.

Related Stories

Photos by Julie Hall.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)

Posted in Business, Community, Dont Miss This 4, Health+Fitness3 Comments

name that bird gone in a flash

Name That Bird: Gone in a Flash

Unlike most species of woodpecker, this relatively large bird spends much of its time on the ground digging up ants and beetles with its slightly curved bill. A Washington native, it is relatively common on Bainbridge Island. The best way to identify this handsome bird is by the unmistakable flash of white on its rump when it flaps quickly away, usually into the safety of a tree.

Do you know it? Tell us!

name that bird gone in a flash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

name that bird gone in a flash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

name that bird gone in a flash

name that bird gone in a flash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

name that bird gone in a flash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related Stories

Photos courtesy of Jay Wiggs. In flight photo courtesy of North Utah Open Fields Bird Forum.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Animals, Wildlife Watch4 Comments

bunny in hole at night by Caroline

Poll: Is Bainbridge Looking too Good for Its Own Good?

Bainbridge Island has been quite the state/national darling lately.

An article this week in the Huffington Post included us among the top ten idyllic islands to retire on. Last month our ferry rides were rated third best in the USA Today Best Boat Ride Contest. Two recent analyses of crime data for cities in Washington State put Bainbridge in the top ten safest Washington cities list, one landing us in third place and the other in seventh. And having dubbed Bainbridge the Digital Capital of Washington last August, Internet giant Google has just named BI’s Go2Marine as its eCity business case study.

What do you think about the positive press? Is it a good thing, or would you rather avoid the attention?

Tell us in our new poll here or in the right margin of our Home page.

Related Stories

Image couresty of Caroline.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Posted in Community, Features, Polls, Popular 21 Comment

Bay Hay and Feed
Virginia Mason