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rainy bainbridge street

Weather: Heavy Rain and Strong Winds This Weekend

The National Weather Service (NWS) is warning of another Pacific storm system affecting our area this weekend. NWS is reporting that heavy rainfall and strong winds Saturday and Sunday could lead to flash flooding, mudslides, and debris flows. Prepare for possible power outages.

  • Saturday Rain. High near 50 degrees F. South wind 9 to 15 mph. Possible new precipitation of up to a quarter of an inch.
  • Saturday Night An 80 percent likelihood of rain, with a low around 50 degrees F. South-southwest wind 11 to 18 mph.
  • Sunday A 70 percent chance of rain, with a high near 53 degrees F. Southwest wind 10 to 14 mph.
  • Sunday Night A 30 percent chance of rain. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 45 degrees F. West-southwest wind 10 to 15 mph, calming after midnight.

Photo by Julie Hall.

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BIFD extricating woman run over by car at Eagle Harbor Condos

Bainbridge Woman Run Over by Car Sustains Life-Threatening Injuries

[Updated at 10:46 and 5:58 p.m. December 19, 2014.]

This afternoon, December 19, at approximately 3:30 a resident of Eagle Harbor Condos was walking hand-in-hand with her two young grandchildren through the condo parking lot when she was struck and run over by a car. She sustained life-threatening injuries and was airlifted to Harborview Hospital in Seattle.

The woman, 71, was pinned under the vehicle and had to be extricated by Bainbridge Island firefighters. Construction workers who happened to be present at the time of the incident assisted with lifting the car to free her, a process that took about 10 minutes.

Her three-year-old grandson also was hit in the accident and sustained nonlife-threatening injuries. He was transported by ambulance to Bremerton’s Harrison Hospital with his parents, who were immediately notified. His 4-year-old sister was also present during the accident but was uninjured.

The driver of the car, also a resident of Eagle Harbor Condos, was a 91-year-old man. He was backing up out of his garage parking place when he hit the woman and child.

Bainbridge Police Officer Aimee LaClaire said because of the seriousness of the circumstances the investigation is being handled by the Washington State Patrol. She explained that the only eyewitness was the 4-year-old granddaughter, which made recreating the facts of the accident difficult. She was not sure if the driver would be cited in any way.

A Harborview Hospital representative said the woman is in critical condition. She added that she is in better condition than expected given the severity of the accident.

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Photo courtesy of the Bainbridge Island Fire Department.

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Photo of the Day: Nuclear-Powered USS Stennis Heads Home

The USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) aircraft carrier cruised through Rich Passage on its way home to Bremerton on December 17 after completing flight-deck certification and onloading ammunition in San Diego.

The USS Stennis is powered by two nuclear reactors, enabling it to sustain high speeds for extended operations. At capacity it holds over 7,500 men and women, about one-third the population of Bainbridge Island.

Thank you to Robert Dashiell for sharing this photograph of the ship passing near Lynwood Center, “tilting to starboard as it turned to port.”

USS STENNIS Rich Passage 18 Dec 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Photo of USS Stennis courtesy of Robert Dashiell. 

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Bainbridge High School

BHS Teacher and Coach Mike Roe Dies Suddenly

Mike Roe, long-time librarian and assistant football coach at Bainbridge High School (BHS), died last night unexpectedly in his sleep. The cause of death is currently not known.

Roe was 61 and in apparent excellent health. The news of his passing has sent a shockwave through the school community. It is the second unexpected death of a BHS faculty member this school year (read more).

“Students and staff are heartbroken by the unexpected loss of yet another teacher, friend, and colleague,” said BHS Principal Mary Alice O’Neill. “Mike had a heart for every student, and championed their pursuit of all career paths. We are finding it hard to comprehend he is gone.”

O’Neill said she shared the news in an early morning staff meeting before school today. Andy Grimm, football head coach and close friend to Roe, took members of the football team aside at the start of school to break the news.

On this final day of classes before holiday break, BHS has opened its counseling doors for anyone needing to talk about the loss. O’Neill said a number of students and staff members alike have sought counseling today. “We are such a close-knit staff, we are all trying to support one another. I’m so glad we could all be together today.”

Bainbridge Island School District Superintendent Faith Chapel said in a message to the staff, “We are all shocked and saddened by the tragic loss of a friend and colleague who devoted so much of his life to us and to our community. Our thoughts go out to Tanya [his wife], Garret [his son], and their family members and friends. As we go our separate ways for winter break, I hope each of you will have the chance to spend quality time with family, friends, and loved ones. Hold them close.”

Roe spent his entire professional career working in the Bainbridge School District. He started as a language arts/social studies teacher at BHS in 1977 before becoming the librarian and “go-to guy” for all things tech. Before joining the football coaching staff, Roe coached soccer. His wife works at Wilkes Elementary School as a speech language pathologist. His close friend Dave Layton, a language arts teacher at BHS, is with the family today.

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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boat parade 2014

Photo of the Week: Boat Parade of Lights 2014

The annual Boat Parade of Lights illuminated Eagle Harbor’s Wharf Marina last Saturday night, with landlubbing carolers and officers from the Bainbridge Island Police Department (BIPD) enjoying ‘smores and hot chocolate as they awaited the finale: the Argosy Holiday ship choir performance.

Thank you to Laurie Isenman for sharing her photograph of the 2014 Boat Parade, which her family boat, Float Plane, led.

boat parade 2014

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barred owl from chimney

The Extraordinary Predicament of the Owl Trapped Down a 50-Foot Chimney

After a couple of days of hearing fluttering in his chimney, a Silverdale homeowner reached through the fireplace’s flue with his camera and took a shot. What he saw was a shock. Looking directly at the camera was a curious, round-eyed, stressed, and very sooty Barred Owl.

The homeowner called West Sound Wildlife Shelter (WSWS) on Bainbridge Island to ask for help. WSWS Operations Manager Lynne Weber agreed to assist with the unusual situation.

According to Weber, the original curved brick fireplace in the 1930s home was about 4.5′ by 4.5′, with a 50-foot-tall chimney about 18″ by 18″ wide inside. The top of the fireplace and bottom of the chimney were sealed with brick except for a 4-inch-wide flue slit opening.

The owl had apparently toppled down the chimney, unable to extend its wings to fly up and out. Weber guessed it had been pursuing a mouse when it fell down the chimney shaft.

The man said he had just sold the house and did not want to remove bricks to extract the raptor through the side of the chimney. And so it went that he and Weber were faced with removing the owl through the 4-inch wide flue.

Sound impossible? That’s what I thought, the challenge even greater because of the fact that the interior of the chimney had recessed areas that the bird was retreating into when Weber reached through the 4-inch gap to attempt to pull her out.

barred owl sootyWeber said being “a stupid human,” after a few hours she finally figured out to block the recessed areas inside the chimney shaft by stuffing towels into them and thereby pushing the bird forward into reach. The problem with that plan, however, was that Weber couldn’t feel the difference between soft towels and the soft-feathered bird. So, painstakingly, inside the sooty fireplace with her body facing down and her arm extended up, Weber removed the towels from the recessed areas and replaced them with small logs.

“Finally she was forced forward,” Weber said about the owl. Once again Weber and the homeowner used a camera to track her position, with help from her “clacking.” When they could see, feel, and hear that she was within reach, they extended a “utensil fabricated with bamboo sticks and netting.” Weber said the idea was to get the owl’s feet tangled into the netting and then pull her down, which is exactly what happened. The man held the bird’s feet, Weber tucked her wings safely into her body, and they delicately pulled her down through the slit. It helped that the bird was a smaller hatchling, born last spring.

Weber, whose dedication to wildlife is a lifelong passion and whose sense of humor is a pleasure for this reporter, said of the young raptor, with classic understatement, “After what we went through, we don’t like each other.”

Back at WSWS, the staff evaluated the extremely sooty bird. Luckily she was uninjured, but soot had penetrated her nares (nostrils), mouth, eyes, and beak. They removed what soot they could and then placed her in a warm indoor enclosure for some rest. The next day they moved her to the Shelter’s flight cage, a large state-of-the-art area where recovering raptors can practice flying and catching prey. Staff provided water for the young owl to groom herself, which took several days of work and frequently replenished bath water.

After nearly a week, the juvenile owl was ready for release. WSWS staff banded and released her into her territory on December 6.

Weber advises all homeowners with chimneys to cap them to prevent problems with wildlife.

Donate to West Sound Wildlife Shelter. Contact them at 206-855-9057.

Photo courtesy of Dottie Tison.

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The Elves Behind the Highway 305 Holiday Lights Display

Like Santa’s elves, starting right after Halloween Bainbridge Islanders Chuck and Dorothy Callaham get to work hanging, stringing, testing, retesting, inflating, and staking their extraordinary Christmas display, lighting up all of our lives with one of the Island’s most spectacular holiday lights shows and certainly its most visible one

Anyone who has driven the north end of Highway 305 between Thanksgiving and New Year’s during the last 25 years or so has witnessed this Island wonder, which is nothing short of jaw-dropping.

When I saw the For Sale sign in front of their compound of houses a few months ago, I got worried. Dorothy Callaham told me I wasn’t the only one. Lately, when she takes her neighborhood constitutional, people ask her gravely if she is selling and thereby ending the Callaham Christmas tradition.

Dorothy Callaham assured me, as she does her frequent concerned inquirers, that the house for sale is not hers but the one behind her, which used to be owned by her parents but is no longer in the family. So, for those of you worried that your kids won’t get to see the Highway 305 lights, rest assured. The Callahams aren’t going anywhere, and they’re as committed as ever to keeping their holiday tradition alive.

Chuck's light workshop.

Chuck’s light workshop.

It all clicked for me when Dorothy and Chuck explained two things: Chuck is a retired electrician, and Dorothy is a hardcore Disney fan. When I asked how they got started with their show of lights, Dorothy explained that her family began by hanging lights for her mother when she lived in the house behind theirs. Gradually, year by year, Dorothy and Chuck, along with Dorothy’s sister in the house next door, expanded their Christmas display, adding decorations piece by piece, light by light.

Dorothy Callaham has lived on the Highway 305 property for 68 years, since she was 4, and Chuck has been on the Island for 75 years, since he was 3. Although there was a difference of opinion between Chuck and Dorothy about when they started their lights display, the settled consensus was the mid 1980s. The couple acknowledged, with good-natured annoyance that is only earned between two people over decades, that they “argue” during their decorating. Possibly, in a charming way, hints of this dynamic were evident during our interview. I, for one, cannot imagine a serene 50 hours of outdoor decorating in all manner of Northwest weather, so no judgment was passed.

As the resident electrician, Chuck is the bulb checker. By this I mean he checks every single one, attempting to salvage anything he can. Dorothy is the one who tracks, year by year through photo records, the placement of decorations on their property. And the two of them “confer,” over time, about what features to move around for variety. Dorothy says they also buy new decorations each year, usually after the holiday season when they are on sale.

The Callahams told me that there are six circuits and six timers, which seemed modest considering the complexity of their production. Each year they put up and take down their entire holiday display, storing it in about 30 well-organized plastic bins in the off season.

305 lightsAlthough the two are getting on in years, they both looked fitter than fiddles to me. They say they try to wait for good-weather days to do their decorating but get out in any weather if need be to meet their deadline of Thanksgiving to launch their first night of holiday lighting.

When I asked the $20,000 question—How much is their December electricity bill?—the Callahams said it was about three times the normal amount. Again, I was surprised by how much bang for their buck we get in terms of inestimable seasonal enjoyment. To commuters who complain that the display is distracting, I say, “Humbug!” The Callahams report that for every complaint, there are many more people who thank them for brightening up their day, and good cheer is what keeps them motivated year after year.

The North Highway 305 lights display, on the east side of the road, runs from Thanksgiving through New Year’s. The Callahams turn on their lights each evening approximately from 4-10 p.m. They keep their lights on all night on Christmas to help Santa find his way.

[Updated from the archives; first published November 12, 2011.]

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Photos by Julie Hall.

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kitten and kid PAWS

PAWS Really—Really—Needs Our Help

With 2015 around the corner, PAWS of Bainbridge Island and North Kitsap is getting ready to celebrate its 40th year, but in an odd position. Our PAWS, not to be confused with other separate organizations around the country called PAWS, is seeing the best of times and the hardest of times.

The good news is that PAWS recently (last spring) expanded with two beautiful new adoption centers, one on Bainbridge and one in Kingston (read more about the expansion). Its Pleasant Beach location on Bainbridge Island replaced a small, poorly equipped space on Miller Road that did not even have potable water. And the Kingston location helped PAWS extend its reach farther into North Kitsap. The new locations were “made possible by the generosity of the Jacobi Family Foundation, which provides support for a portion of the rental expenses.” With rallying help from other community groups and donors, PAWS raised the funds to furnish the new spaces with state-of-the-art features, including more space, proper ventilation, improved cleaning facilities, and numerous other upgrades to improve conditions for the animals and help increase adoption rates.

It was a win win, and last spring’s fundraising auction pulled in more money than ever before.

Bella paws catFast forward to now. According to Board President Shaun Stephenson, since then donations and volunteerism have dropped. Since July PAWS has been only getting revenue at half the rate of its expenditures. That has meant that the nonprofit no-kill organization, a beloved Island fixture since it was launched by Mildred Frey, Diane Blymer, and Lila Dolan back in 1975, has had to scramble to stay afloat. (PAWS was revitalized in the 1990s by Judy Hartstone, Catherine MacDonald, Nancy Biery, and Marilyn Schaefer.)

The staff has been cut to just three full-time paid workers, down from five, with the Executive Director and Volunteer Coordinator positions eliminated. The remaining staff are working overtime to keep up with the demands of running two locations, as well as caring for the many cats at the Cattery, a location that houses cats not ready or suitable for placement at the adoption centers. Stephenson explained that PAWS also has had to draw from its reserve emergency fund, something the Board is loathe to do.

Why the shortfall? Board Vice President Delight Willing believes people simply don’t realize that PAWS needs help. “With the growth last year, the perception has been that we’re doing great and don’t need as much help with donations and volunteering,” said Willing.

Moco paws dogWilling and Stephenson explained that the Board has stepped up to fill the role of the Executive Director and take the lead in stabilizing the organization. Willing said, “We love this organization and are very excited and committed to fill the shoes of the Executive Director. Everyone [on the Board] is stepping up to the plate.” Stephenson emphasized his goal of ensuring that PAWS is in a “continuously sustainable” position moving forward. “Entering our 40th year we intend to have another great 40 years.”

Board member Kent Bridwell explained that the Board met last week for an all-day pow-wow to outline the next steps in its plan to revitalize the organization and reach out to donors and volunteers. Willing said the Board sees this as a time to shore up its foundation and restructure. “It’s a period of challenge we are ready to meet,” she said.

splash familyIn addition to reducing its staff and increasing the hands-on involvement of Board members, PAWS is working more with the Kitsap Humane Society to utilize its much larger resources, such as veterinary services. PAWS also is tapping into its network of key supporters—both donors and volunteers. Willing said, “We are personally contacting donors, and we are reaching out to our volunteer database.” Finally, with this article, PAWS is extending a paw to the public about its circumstances, services, and need.

Ways to Volunteer

  1. work 3-hour shifts at the adoption centers;
  2. help organize and run events such as the annual auction and Wagfest; and
  3. provide fostering for animals, particularly mother cats with kittens, typically a 6-7 week commitment.

PAWS Services

  1. When you adopt a cat or dog from PAWS, the adoption is subsidized by 50 percent. That means that each adoptee has been spayed/neutered, given veterinary care, provided with needed shots, and microchipped all for half of the actual cost, with the rest covered by PAWS to make adoptions more accessible to all.
  2. Dogs? PAWS does not have facilities to house dogs, but it has an ongoing commitment to help dogs in need find loving homes. It also provides regular dog adoption events at its adoption centers.
  3. The PALS (Pets and Loving Seniors) program provides full coverage of veterinary costs and a guarantee of permanent placement for pets to seniors in need who wish to adopt a cat or dog.
  4. Kitsap Lost Pets helps connect lost animals every day with their human families.
  5. Vet Assist provides $75 coupons to low-income people to help with veterinary care for their cats and dogs.
  6. The Feral Cat Capture program catches feral cats and spays/neuters them to reduce feline overpopulation and disease. The program has dramatically reduced feral populations in our area.
  7. The Respite Care program provides up to 48 hours of temporary care for cats and dogs if their person/people are in crisis. Women attempting to leave abusive domestic situations, for example, can utilize this service to ensure that their pets are safe while they transition to a new living situation.
  8. As a no-kill organization, PAWS houses at its Cattery cats who are unadoptable, either for health or behavioral reasons.Levi Charlie paws dogs

Learn how to donate to and/or volunteer for PAWS.

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 Photos by Julie Hall and Melissa Byrd.

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sunny shore by joe michael

Photo of the Day: Calm After the Storm

How sweet it is to see the sun and get outside in the fine weather that followed a tempestuous week.

Thanks Joe Michael for sharing this lovely shot of our serene Island paradise.

Do you recognize this view on the northeast side of Bainbridge?

sunny shore by joe michael

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fallen tree by Rene Hackl

Photo and Poems of the Day: Near Miss at Courthouse, Mouse, & ‘Disaster’

As we seek to control our circumstances with greater and greater exactitude and tell ourselves most days that we are immune to nature’s caprices, Robert Burns’s words from his 1785 poem “To A Mouse, On Turning Her Up In Her Nest With The Plough” still resonate: “The best laid plans of mice and men / Go often awry / And leave us with nothing but grief and pain / For promised joy!”

Fortunately for most of us, including the Bainbridge municipal building in Rolling Bay, last night’s storm was no disaster, which reminds me of another terrific poem worth a read if you haven’t lately:

One Art 

by Elizabeth Bishop, 1911 - 1979

The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.

—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

Thank you to Rene Hackl for sharing this photograph of a tree fallen during last night’s storm.

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Photo courtesy of Rene Hackl. 

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candle by firemedic58

Storm Damage Updates

[Updated at 9:39 and 10:15 p.m., December 11]

Puget Sound Energy (PSE) is reporting multiple power failures across Bainbridge Island. Crews are being dispatched. No restoration time estimates have been provided.

As the wind whips up, the Bainbridge Island Fire Department (BIFD) and Police Department are beginning to respond to reports of downed trees and wires.

Outages

  • A major outage affecting nearly 4,000 PSE customers occurred at 7:25 p.m. in the mid-south part of the Island.
  • As of 9:23 p.m., there is an outage affecting 1,230 customer in the Point White Drive neighborhood.
  • Multiple small outages have occurred on the north and mideastern areas of the Island.

Road Closures

Toppled trees and downed wires:

  • Madison Avenue N. just north of Day Road is closed to traffic due to a fallen wire.
  • BIFD is investigating reports of wires down or on fire at Agate Pass and Sandwick Place.
  • A tree is into the wires on Country Club Road.

Photo courtesy of candle by firemedic58.

 

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Hazardous Weather Warning: High Winds and Landslide Risk

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a hazardous weather statement for today and tonight for the Seattle area.

High winds of 30-40 mph are expected to begin at about 4 p.m., with gusts of up to 60-65 mph developing later this evening. The worst wind is predicted to ease after midnight and taper off by about 4 a.m.

NWS is warning that soil instability from excessive precipitation in the last 24 hours presents an increased risk of landslides in our area.

Large toppled trees, flash floods, and widescale power outages are expected.

 

 

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Walla Walla

Ferry Advisory: Delays Coming for Bainbridge/Seattle and Kingston/Edmonds Commuters

Washington State Ferries (WSF) is advising travelers on the Seattle/Bainbridge and Edmonds/Kingston routes to expect significant delays starting midday Friday, December 12, through Tuesday, December 16.

The 202-vehicle Puyallup, which is currently filling in for the out-of-service Tacoma on the Seattle/Bainbridge route, will be pulled from service for four days for a mandatory annual U.S. Coast Guard safety inspection.

The 188-vehicle Walla Walla will be reassigned from the Kingston/Edmonds route to fill in for the Puyallup, reducing car capacity on the Bainbridge/Seattle route by 14. But worse delays for Bainbridge commuters will come from overflow traffic from the Edmonds/Kingston run, which will have reduced capacity by 44 vehicles on half of its daily sailings. WSF is advising Edmonds/Kingston customers to take Seattle/Bainbridge Island sailings as an alternative or to drive around.

WSF said customers on both routes should arrive early and plan for waits. WSF said, on the Edmonds/Kingston run ”drivers may experience a one-boat wait between 6:25 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. out of Kingston and a one-boat wait between 3:15 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. out of Edmonds.”

WSF also noted that weekend traffic is heavier than weekday traffic, especially in mid-December.

Walk on passengers and the Seattle/Bremerton sailings are not expected to be affected by these changes.

For more information, contact WSF Communications Director Marta Coursey at coursem@wsdot.wa.gov.

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Photo of the Walla Walla by Julie Hall.

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holiday music truck

A Hot Toddy History of the BIFD Holiday Music Truck

Perk up your ears, because this week the annual Bainbridge Fire Department Holiday Music Truck starts its rounds of Island neighborhoods. For those of you unfamiliar with this Island tradition, the BIFD festoons one of its trucks for the holidays and tours a different section of the Island playing holiday music for four-hour shifts 13 nights in a row, culminating on Christmas Eve. View the 2014 schedule.

Let me tell you that this is hard to miss, even from remote crannies of our Rock, because it is loud, as in really loud. When I asked Lieutenant and volunteer firefighter Jim Dow how the drivers of the Truck protect themselves from permanent hearing loss, he explained, “the speakers project outward, so it’s not too loud inside. We’re usually singing along the whole way.”

I asked when the tradition began. Dow said he remembers the Holiday Truck from way back in the 1950s, when he was a kid on Bainbridge. He suggested I ask the oldest member of the Fire Department, Chuck Callaham (see The Elves Behind the Hwy 305 Holiday Lights Display) when it started, but Callaham couldn’t remember the precise year either, just that it was sometime in the ‘50s. Both mentioned that in those days, when the Island was a much quieter place and cultural norms were different, Islanders would leave hot toddies in their mailboxes for the Holiday Truck drivers.

Dow said that now hot chocolate is welcome, but what really makes this a hugely popular gig for members of the Department is the love they feel from the community—happy smiles, waves, kids peaking through their bedroom windows, people running out in their pajamas with plates of cookies and candy. Occasionally the Truck passes a Christmas party, and all the party goers empty out of the house to wave and sing along.

A few people have requested not to be serenaded by the Truck, so the Department turns its music off in some places, including areas where it might especially bother wildlife.

Dow explained that each night of the holiday tour runs from about 5-9 p.m. Driving the Holiday rig is so popular among the firefighters that often it’s necessary for BIFD staffers to draw straws for the privilege. Dow said, “A lot of drivers bring their families along. One year I brought the high school girls basketball team.” When I asked about the music itself, Dow said that there used to be a couple of tapes that the Department used each year, but now many staffers make their own cds of holiday favorites. As for dinner, many of the drivers rendezvous to eat with family and/or friends.

One of Dow’s best memories over his 28 years in the Department is an 11- or 12-year-old girl who ran out onto her front porch to listen to the Truck and was joined by her black lab: “She put her arm around her dog, and the two of them sat on their haunches together smiling and swaying to the music.” Dow said another particularly rewarding part of the tradition is passing homes of single elderly people: “We remind them they’re not alone on the holidays.”

Whatever age you are, there is something irresistible about this sweet Island tradition. I asked Dow if he knew of such traditions in other communities: “We can’t be the only ones who do this, but I’ve never heard of another town that does.” Whether it’s unique to Bainbridge, I for one am glad it’s here “at the most wonderful time of the year,” at least for one blinking, melodic moment of good cheer.

[This article from the archives was first published December 4, 2011.]

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Photos courtesy of Assistant Chief Luke Carpenter.

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Escaped Felon Suspect Catches Ride at Longhouse Texaco After Home Invasion

Kitsap County Sheriff’s detectives have identified a suspect, Armstrong Nunes, believed to have been involved in a Poulsbo home invasion that involved a physical confrontation between the suspect and the homeowner at about 10 a.m. on December 5 in the 5400 block of NE Laura Loop.

The suspect is believed to have stolen several firearms from the home. He sustained a serious injury to his hand from a knife during the confrontation. After fleeing the home, the suspect asked for help at a neighboring home but left before sheriff’s patrol deputies arrived.

He fled southbound on foot and was last observed at the Longhouse Texaco convenience store at 15915 Highway 305 in Poulsbo. The Longhouse store’s security camera shows that the suspect approached a male customer refueling his vehicle at pump #4 and solicited a ride. The customer left the station with the suspect heading north on Highway 305 between 10:30 and 11:30 that morning.

Detectives are interested in speaking with the driver of the vehicle, a small, gold sedan. Authorities do not consider the driver of the car an accomplice or suspect.

Armstrong Nunes

Armstrong Nunes, April 2014

There is an outstanding, no bail, felony warrant of arrest for Nunes issued by the Washington State Department of Corrections for escape from community custody. His previous felony convictions include 1st degree theft, two counts of 3rd degree assault, and 2nd degree burglary.

Nunes, whose full name is Hayden David Armstrong Nunes, is a 21-year-old white male with brown hair and eyes. He is 5′ 9″ and 190 pounds, with tatoos on his left hand, right arm, and right shoulder. He goes by various aliases.

Citizens with any information about the burglary or the owner of the vehicle that gave the suspect a ride are asked to contact Detective Chad Birkenfeld at 360-337-5619 or Detective Ray Stroble at 360-337-5614, citing case number K14-011837.

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Photos courtesy of Kitsap County Sheriff’s Office.

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fallen tree

Weather: Urgent Flood & High Wind Warnings

The National Weather Service has issued an “urgent” coastal flood warning for the Seattle area starting early Wednesday morning at 4 a.m. through Thursday afternoon. A coinciding “urgent” high wind advisory also is in effect for late Wednesday night through Thursday evening, potentially affecting commuters.

Tidal overflow is expected to produce flooding in low-lying areas around inland waters. High winds are expected to exacerbate flooding from high tides spiking at 8 a.m. Wednesday and 9-10 a.m. Thursday. A 1-2 foot storm surge could occur in conjunction with Thursday morning’s high tide.

High winds of 30 to 40 mph and gusts of up to 65 mph are predicted between Wednesday night and Thursday evening. The National Weather Service warns of wind and saturated soils toppling large trees and leading to widespread power outages. The advistory states, “A high wind watch means there is potential for a damaging wind event. Forecasts should be monitored closely.”

Photo courtesy of Pete

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arms around bainbridge 2015 calendar

Arms Around Bainbridge’s 2015 Calendar Makes a Gorgeous Gift

From Oregon to California to Paris to Iceland and beyond the new Arms Around Bainbridge calendar features stunning highlights of Bainbridge-based photographer Pete Saloutos’s work over the course of the past year. And at $20, the one-of-a-kind, heavy-card-stock calendar is a steal you can feel good about, whether you’re buying it as a gift or to hang on your wall at home.

Saloutos, who sells his work around the world, said this year’s production value for the calendar is better than ever: “We created the 13-month calendar this year so people can pull images they like from it for framing.”

Saloutos sells many of his prints for big bucks. I asked him what his top-selling images are from this year’s calendar, and he said the lighthouse and full moon shots are particular favorites.

Lighthouse in Iceland

Lighthouse in Iceland

With images and design costs donated by Saloutos, one of the founding members of AAB, and paper and printing costs donated by KP Corporation, the calendar is a key fundraiser for the nonprofit organization that assists Bainbridge Islanders with debilitating health problems. Currently there are 10 recipients of AAB’s financial and resource support.

All proceeds from calendar sales go to AAB, an all-volunteer organization in its ninth year created by and for Bainbridge Island residents. Read here about one recipient and her struggle with brain cancer.

moon by Pete Saloutos

Mono Lake, California

The calendar is currently for sale at the following Bainbridge Island businesses: Town & Country Market, Island Fitness, Roby King Gallery, the Aquatic Center, Eagle Harbor Books, and Lollipops Children’s Boutique.

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Images from the calendar courtesy of Pete Saloutos.

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fire station 23

Public Meeting Tonight About BIFD Levies, Including Staffing Fire Station 23

A special Bainbridge Island Fire Commissioners meeting will be held tonight at Station 23 on Phelps Road at 6:30 to discuss what, if any, levy measures the department will put on the February 10, 2015, ballot.

One of the possible measures would ask taxpayers to support paying for sufficient staffing to keep Fire Station 23 consistently open to serve the north end of the Island in a timely manner, something that is not currently possible with that station only intermittently staffed with volunteers. Just three weeks ago on November 16, a Port Madison home was incinerated and the family dog killed in a fire that the BIFD was second on the scene to after North Kitsap Fire & Rescue. The BIFD’s slower response time was due to the fact that it had to send responders from Station 21 on Madison Avenue.

fire department coverage map

BIFD coverage map

With Station 23 lacking full-time staff, north Islanders remain in jeopardy of not receiving adequate response times for lifesaving measures from the BIFD, something Chief Teran has been requesting for several years.

The featured map shows response times for different areas of the Island based on 2011 CENCOM (911 dispatch) data for Bainbridge. The BIFD has set a 5-minute response-time goal based on First Basic Life Support data. A response time of no more than 8 minutes 59 seconds is considered a reasonable lifesaving window.

What Zone Are You in?

If you live within a green zone, the EMTs could make it to your house with no problem, either from Station 21 or 22, the one on Bucklin Hill Road. If you live in a yellow zone, you would probably get help within the crucial time frame. If you happen to be among the many Islanders in the red zone, you may well not get emergency care in time.

The other possible levy measure to be discussed at tonight’s meeting would ask taxpayers to support renovations of existing BIFD facilities and/or new construction of facilities.

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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Rain

Weather: Great Walls of Rain

Clear those gutters, because ma(h)ssive rain is moving in.

Here is the National Weather Service forecast for Bainbridge Island:

  • Monday A 50 percent chance of rain. Cloudy, with a high near 54 degrees F. South wind around 9 mph.
  • Monday Night A 90 percent likelihood of rain, with a low around 49 degrees F. South wind 11 to 21 mph. Between a half and three-quarters of an inch of rain possible.
  • Tuesday A 100 forecast for rain, mainly before 4 p.m. High near 57 degrees F. Breezy, with a southwest wind around 22 mph. A quarter to half of an inch of precipitation possible.
  • Tuesday Night A 100 forecast for rain, mainly after 10 p.m., with a low around 50 degrees F. South-southwest wind around 14 mph, becoming southeast in the evening. Between a half and three-quarters of an inch of rain possible.
  • Wednesday A 100 forecast for rain, with a high near 56 degrees F. Breezy, with a south wind 18 to 23 mph. Between a half and three-quarters of an inch of rain possible.
  • Wednesday Night A 90 percent likelihood of rain. Low around 49 degrees F. Between a tenth and quarter of an inch of rain possible.
  • Thursday A 70 percent chance of rain. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 51 degrees F.
  • Thursday Night Rain likely. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 45 degrees F.

Photo courtesy of Wonderlane.

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foggy battle point park

Photo & Sound of the Day: F(r)oggy Battle Point Park

As the deep fog settled over Battle Point Park Sunday evening, December 7, a chirping Pacific tree frog sounded through the misted world, as it has for weeks.

With amphibians taking the front-line hits of climate change and their worldwide populations plummeting, it is an increasingly lovely and rare privilege to hear them.

Here is the frog call:

foggy battle point park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Sarah Lane. 

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