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Helipad

Bainbridge Woman Rescued from Eagle Harbor Waters with Life-Threatening Injuries

At approximately 9:30 this morning, September 1, people in a sailboat in Eagle Harbor spotted a woman in distress in the water. They attempted to pull her to safety but were unable to. A couple in a large power boat arrived to assist and succeeded in pulling her aboard. They covered the woman, who was seriously injured and hypothermic, in blankets to warm her.

The rescuing parties reported the emergency to the Coast Guard, initially indicating that they were near the Bainbridge Island ferry dock. Coast Guard officials alerted Bainbridge fire and police at 9:48 a.m., and units arrived within minutes at the ferry terminal area and began searching for the power boat.

Several concerned witnesses also called 911.

Further communication clarified that the power boat was actually near the Waterfront Park dock, so emergency responders relocated to Waterfront Park.

Paramedics treated the 54-year-old Wing Point resident and airlifted her to Seattle for further care for life-threatening but treatable injuries. It was determined that she was having a medical emergency. To protect her privacy, no further information is available.

This incident is unrelated to the Eagle Harbor water rescue that occurred last night.

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Photo courtesy of BIFD.

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name that bird deranged yodeler

Name That Bird: Deranged Yodeler from Dino Time?

This large striking black-and-white red-eyed water bird can be spotted on coastlines and inland fresh lakes in the Pacific Northwest. Lucky Bainbridge Islanders occasionally see this species or hear its unmistakable tremolo and yodel calls, which can travel as far as five miles away to the human ear.

One of the oldest birds on Earth, this species was around at the end of the reign of the dinosaurs 65 millions years ago.

Awkward on land, it was named from several forms of Scandinavian words meaning “lame.” Although it is unsuited to walking, this powerful bird is agile and skilled in the water, diving without a sound and remaining submerged in search of prey for as long as 15 minutes. It is a strong flyer, reaching up to 90 miles an hour during migration to winter in warmer climes.

This bird’s average size is 12 pounds, with a length of 3 feet and a wingspan of a 4.5 feet. It primarily eats fish and invertebrates, but its predators are diverse and include large fish, turtles, mammals such as raccoons and skunks, and birds such as ravens and gulls. It fights back by stabbing attackers with its dagger-like bill.

Babies leave their nests within hours of hatching and spend their early weeks practicing swimming and hopping a ride on mom or dad to warm up and stay safe.

The species figures prominently in Native American lore, including a well-known Chippewa creation story.

Can you name this fascinating bird?

loon with babies by Pete Markham

name that bird deranged yodeler

name that bird deranged yodeler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Photos courtesy of Jay Wiggs except for shot with babies courtesy of Pete Markham. 

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Wilkes Elementary School with sunflowers

Bainbridge Public School Schedules 2014-2015

Here are the schedules for the Bainbridge Island School District 2014-2015 year. School begins Wednesday, September 3. Early-release Mondays are in effect.

Bainbridge High School
School Hours: 8:35 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Early Release: 8:35 a.m. – 1:35 p.m.

Eagle Harbor High School
School Hours: 8:35 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Early Release: 8:35 a.m. – 1:35 p.m.

Odyssey
Gr. 1-6 School Hours 7:50 a.m. – 2:20 p.m.; Early Release 7:50 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Gr. 7-8 School Hours 8:35 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.; Early Release 8:35 a.m. – 1:35 p.m.

Sakai Intermediate School
School Hours: 8:40 a.m. – 3:05 p.m.
Early Release: 8:40 a.m. – 1:35 p.m.

Woodward Middle School
School Hours: 8:50 a.m. – 3:12 p.m.
Early Release: 8:50 a.m. – 1:42 p.m.

Blakely Elementary School
School Hours: 7:50 a.m. – 2:20 p.m.
Early Release: 7:50 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.

Ordway Elementary School
School Hours: 7:50 a.m. – 2:20 p.m.
Early Release: 7:50 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.

Wilkes Elementary School
School Hours: 7:50 a.m. – 2:20 p.m.
Early Release: 7:50 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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Posted in Community, New 3, Schools0 Comments

bus

Bainbridge School District 2014-2015 Bus Routes

Here are the Bainbridge Island School District’s regularly scheduled bus routes for the 2014-2015 school year.

The first day of school is Wednesday, September 3.

Click to enlarge.

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10 by Elliot Brown

IB’s Top Ten Stories in August 2014

Here are the most-read stories Inside Bainbridge published in August, 2014, in descending order:

  1. Girl up a Tree to Save a Forest; Visconsi Set to Pull Her Down and Jail Her
  2. The Sharks Among Us in Puget Sound and Jawesome Factoids
  3. National Manhunt for Suspect Linked to 24 Bainbridge Burglaries
  4. Ordway & BHS Get Left Behind: Ordway Parents Have Last-Minute Option to Change Schools
  5. Bainbridge Tree Sitter Gets 24-Hour Reprieve (w/ Photo Gallery)
  6. Bicyclist Coming Down Steep Hill Hits Car on Highway 305
  7. Visconsi Mowing Down Trees (w/ Video)
  8. Rollover Accident on 305 Caused ‘No Fatalities Within Inches’
  9. Bainbridge Island’s Girl in a Tree Decides to Come Down
  10. Crowd Gathers for Key Bank/Visconsi Protest

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Photo courtesy of Elliot Brown.

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Posted in IB's Top Ten Stories, Inside Bainbridge News, New 4, News0 Comments

The Honey Bucket That Got Away

Some three and a half years ago, shortly before the fool’s idea of launching Inside Bainbridge zizzed my brain, something wonderful happened. I drove by a striking scene: A Honey Bucket picked up from an event at Battle Point Park and loaded onto a trailer traveling down the steep hill of Devil’s Dip (Arrow Point Drive) had teetered and plummeted into the deep brush of the ditch at the side of the road.

At the time I did not regard the sight as wonderful. What contorted mind would? It was a mix of, sure, funny, as well as slightly awful, but I was picking up my kid and the driver was okay and had a cell phone. I gawked for a moment and drove on.

Ah, how that dumped Honey Bucket haunts me now. How many times have I rued its timing as I pass the familiar spot.

Here was an irresistible small-town story: exquisitely photographic, slightly sickening as the mind considers the spilled contents, uncomfortable imagining the mortification of the driver and cathartic that it is not you, amusing to envision the creative towing that would have to follow, and ultimately painless since no one actually got hurt.

At the time of my Honey Bucket moment I was still a “regular citizen.” I was a seasoned writer who had experience with journalism, but having my adrenals shift into fifth gear over local news was never part of my life plan. Truth is I found local news trivial and was much more apt to read national news or listen to NPR than pick up a local paper. I didn’t think twice about leaving the house without my camera. If I saw fire trucks or police cars zoom by, I didn’t turn around to follow them. If there was an accident or traffic jam, I was simply glad not to be in it; I didn’t ride my bike at full torque around stalled traffic to get to the scene without delay. I didn’t have the police chief in the contact list of my cell phone. I had never been to a federal courthouse or seen a jail. I had never driven at 4 a.m. to the scene of someone’s home engulfed in flames. And I had never waited hour by hour for coroners’ reports.

When a Honey Bucket lurched across my path, I didn’t grab my camera and notebook with exhilaration. I did not welcome it as a grotesque gift the way I would now.

No, a toppled Honey Bucket on a wooded road of Bainbridge Island isn’t Pulitzer Prize material, but you know you would have read that story.

But now I understand—on a cellular level—that small-town news is the stuff of national news. The human condition is essentially the same wherever you go, and the stories of our lives are too: domestic violence, car accidents, failed leadership, successful leadership, mental illness, unemployment, dedicated public service, corrupt politics, environmental destruction, heroic nonprofit work, bigotry, drunk driving, philanthropy, corporate deceit, the creation and defamation of art, brutality and altruism, good laws and bad, and the list continues. . . .

Across the planet there are buckets of honey and hell—a mess of loss and grace, abuse and redemption. It is all here in my village, and for now I have made it my job to turn my corner of this world’s babble into speech.

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Image courtesy of Nicolás Boullosa, not me.

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Posted in Accidents, Features, My Rock, News, Popular 31 Comment

crockpot in port orchard by JH

Kitsap’s First Pot Shop the Shape of Things to Come to Bainbridge?

As legal pot fires up in Washington State, Kitsap County’s first marijuana retailer, Crockpot, opened its doors Sunday, August 24, in Port Orchard.

With the voter-mandated passage of legal recreational marijuana in our state, the Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB) designated up to 10 pot retail stores in Kitsap, with one specifically on Bainbridge Island, two in Bremerton, and seven others “at large” across the rest of the county.

Crockpot, inspired by the nickname of owner Randy “Crock” Jones, is seeing steady business despite what he called price gouging by the temporarily limited pool of marijuana suppliers.

Washington pot retailers are presently in short supply of product, but growers are expected to flood the market early this fall, in September/October. WSLCB Communications Director Brian Smith said suppliers are just catching up with demand and will soon inundate retailers with choices, ultimately lowering the cost for buyers. Jones echoed Smith, saying he expects that supply will soon exceed demand, enabling him to pass lowered costs on to customers. He said he will likely not continue to do business with the price-gouging sources he has been dealing with thus far.crockpot by jh

Jones said that in his first days of business he has had customers from around the region, including parts of Seattle where people say they have waited in 1-2 hour lines only to be turned away after inventory was wiped out.

Smith said that of the 21 licenses approved for pot retail in King County, only one had opened shop: Cannabis Land. He explained that others are “sitting on their licenses” waiting to refinance and/or to reconfigure their businesses to handle an undefined market.

Jones said that many of his customers so far are “retired folks excited and happy to get back to pot from a legal source.” He estimated that there are 4-5 other pot shops preparing to open their doors soon in Port Orchard. I asked him if he was concerned about the competition, and he said that he thinks there is a wide enough net of demand.crockpot by jh

The Bainbridge Island City Council, partially in conjunction with state guidelines, has limited marijuana business here to a very small triangle in the Miller/Day Road area. It remains to be seen who, if anyone, will meet the city’s stringent regulations for the business of pot on Bainbridge Island.

There is more to this story. Look for updates coming soon.

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Photos by Julie Hall. 

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Posted in Business, Community, Don't Miss This 20 Comments

gabriel gaeta in court

Murdered Girl’s Family Friend at Court Hearing Calls the Accused a ‘Monster’

Gabriel Gaeta, the 17-year-old suspect in the rape and murder of his 6-year-old neighbor Jenise Wright, made his second court appearance today, August 28. The scheduled arraignment was meant to determine if Gaeta is fit to stand trial, but the assessment of his mental state was delayed. A new hearing was set for September 12 to follow a mental evaluation scheduled for next week, September 3.

Todd Best, a friend of Jenise’s father, James Wright, spoke out about the case after the brief court appearance. A former New York firefighter and current Bremerton resident, Best told me he was at the hearing to show support for the Wright family. He explained that he knows “Jimmy,” whom he described as a skilled carpenter, from working with him on numerous job sites. When he found out about Jenise’s tragic death, Best said he felt terrible and began checking in on his friend. “In difficult situations you find out who your friends are,” he said.

“In the Eyes of the Law He Is a child, but It Was a Man Who Committed That Act”

Best did not wish to speak on behalf of the Wright family, but he expressed strong emotion about the tragic events they have faced. He called the brutal rape and murder of Jenise an act that could only be committed by a “monster.” He recalled with disbelief how Gaeta stood 10 feet from him during the vigil for Jenise before her body was found: “I was handing out candles. I probably handed him one. . . . In the eyes of the law he is a child, but it was a man who committed that act.”

Jenise was raped, beaten, strangled, and buried in mud near her home in the Steele Creek Mobile Home Park in East Bremerton.

gabriel gaeta in courtBest defended James Wright, saying that some media sources have taken his statements out of context and distorted his intent. “I believe they have made him look different from how he is. He’s a good, hardworking family man,” he said.

When I asked Best about Wright’s statement that he has forgiven Gaeta, whom he knew from the neighborhood and had been teaching to chop wood, Best said, “Jimmy is more of a simple man. He said if he walked around with a heart full of hate he couldn’t live with it. I don’t know if I would be able to forgive so soon. But we all grieve in different ways.”

Best said, “We are burying her this weekend.” He plans to be present for every court hearing: “I will be here through this.”

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Photos by Julie Hall.

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Posted in Crime, Don't Miss This 1, News1 Comment

comp plan

Environment- al Bainbridge Meets Tonight to Prepare for 9/11 Comp Plan Meeting

The group Environmental Bainbridge is holding an “On the Ground” meeting tonight, August 28, in anticipation of the upcoming Comprehensive Plan update citizen input meeting in September.

According to Debbi Lester, tonight’s Environmental Bainbridge meeting is a followup to the KeyBank/Visconsi Mall protests and a chance “to come together to achieve a shared vision through the Comprehensive Plan Update/Navigate Bainbridge process.”

Tonight’s meeting is at 7:30 at Winslow Way Cohousing, 353 Wallace Way NE. Drivers are asked to park across Wallace Way in the Union Bank parking lot. People with questions about the meeting are directed to contact Leif Utne at leifutne@gmail.com or 612-327-0123. 

The next Comprehensive Plan update meeting is scheduled for Thursday, September 11, at 7 p.m. in the city council chambers at City Hall. The primary purpose of the meeting is to plan the public participation process, about which citizens are invited to give input. The meeting will be hosted by the Planning Commission.

The Navigate Bainbridge Steering Committee is overseeing the current ongoing Comprehensive Plan update. Bainbridge Island’s Comp Plan is revised every 20 years. The latest revision, a two-year process, is in the early stages.

Learn more here.

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Photo by Julie Hall. 

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Posted in Community, Environment, Government, News0 Comments

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Bicyclist Coming Down Steep Hill Hits Car on Highway 305

A 55-year-old man on a bicycle heading west down extremely steep Lovgreen Road struck a northbound vehicle on Highway 305 late this afternoon at approximately 5:34.

Bainbridge Island police responded first at the scene and temporarily closed 305 to through traffic.

Bainbridge Fire Department paramedics treated the injured cyclist and transported him via ambulance to Harborview Hospital in Seattle for further treatment of nonlife-threatening injuries.

The cyclist struck the side of a dark blue Subaru Outback.

Traffic is moving again slowly.

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Photo by Julie Hall.

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bad mood cat by Tscherno

Inside Bainbridge in a Bad Mood

The snark factor has been a bit high lately. For example, a reader recently commented, “Could we report on something worth talking about?”

I was not aware that the reporting at Inside Bainbridge was done by any one other than myself and Sarah Lane. As far as I know the people doing that work seven days a week free of charge to readers are just the two of us.

Perhaps some readers are unaware of or have forgotten who “we” are. We are not a corporation. We are people who live on Bainbridge Island and are deeply committed to the community we share with our readers. We care about this place and the life and culture of it. Month after month we work very hard to keep independent journalism alive here. We bring it to you without a subscription fee or a paywall. Anyone anywhere can read our website for free.

Please do not take us for granted. Please do not insult two people giving you a free gift every day. You can disagree with us. You can dislike an article. You can choose not to read us. You can ask us questions and make requests about what you’d like us to write about. But please don’t forget who is doing this work. It is not you. It is us—real people, in your little town, maybe in your neighborhood.

We do not take you for granted.happy mood by Ramona Forcella

  • Thank you to those of you who donate to Inside Bainbridge. We are grateful to each one of you for your contributions, large and small. They help so much.
  • Thank you to our advertisers. Without you we would shut down.
  • Thank you to our contributors. You add a wonderful range of voice and vision to Inside Bainbridge.
  • Finally, thank you readers. You drive us crazy, and we love you.

I’m not in a bad mood now. That’s what I love about writing.

Please consider making a donation to Inside Bainbridge via Paypal or a check.

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Inside Bainbridge
321 High School Road, Suite D3, #209
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110

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Images by Tscherno and Ramona Forcella.

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Posted in Don't Miss This 3, Inside Bainbridge News, News12 Comments

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Band on the Run: Council Changes Weekly Meeting Day, Again

Many of us had just gotten used to Bainbridge Island City Council meetings being held on Mondays instead of Wednesdays, a change implemented in February. Leaf wavers take note that the Council has decided to move its meeting time once again, now to Tuesday evenings.

The change will begin Tuesday, September 2.

Take a trip back to 1973 with the Paul McCartney & Wings hit “Band on the Run” from the album of the same name:

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Photo by Sarah Lane.

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fawn eating blackberries JH

Photos of the Day: Sweet Tooth

While her companions, two does and another fawn, were content to munch on grass, this young black-tailed deer helped herself to juicy blackberries in their prime right off the vine off of Arrow Point Drive. She also browsed on the blackberry leaves and tenderest vines.

Deer will feed on a range of berries, including salmonberry, red huckleberry, serviceberry, salal berry, thimbleberry, and elderberry, as well as native and nonnative blackberry.

Bainbridge Island is home to black-tailed deer, a subspecies of mule deer. Both types have distinctive large mule-like ears. The does are very protective mothers. Just two days before taking these photos I observed one of the large adults in this small herd facing off with a coyote from about 25 feet, with the coyote retreating.fawn eating blackberries JH

deer eating grass JH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Photos by Julie Hall.

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Posted in Animals, Features, New 4, Photo of the Week, Wildlife Watch1 Comment

delorean

Rock Rent-A-Car Rolls into Town

With its Back to the Future themed entry (complete with a DeLorean) in this summer’s July Fourth parade, Rock Rent-A-Car swung open its car doors to customers. With a small upstairs office in the back of the former Sterling Bank Building at 600 Winslow Way E #220 (across from the police station), the company is road testing its business model with an initial inventory of several full-size Chevy Malibus, a Ford F150 pickup truck, and a fully electric Nissan Leaf. (No, the DeLorean is not for rent.)

General Manager Jon Hibbs told me the company is starting slow and experimenting with understanding the market. He explained that owner Dan Rosenberg, a Bainbridge resident, started the business because he saw “an area underserved and monopolized by a large nonlocal corporation.” Referring to Enterprise, with the closest location in Poulsbo, Hibbs said, “People shouldn’t have to leave the Island to get a car.”

The currently modest startup hopes to attract both locals and visitors to Bainbridge Island who need temporary use of a vehicle. Hibbs said one recent customer who just moved to the Island rented the Leaf for four days while she got settled and is now so enamored of the car she plans to buy one. Others rent cars from Rock when visiting for a local conference or event or when their car is in the shop. Hibbs mentioned one customer from Arizona who lives on a boat here in the summer and uses Rock when he needs wheels. People needing a pick up can rent it for four hours, a day, a long weekend or longer.

Hibbs said the company is committed to a “customer service ideal.” He will pick up and drop off where you are, at no extra cost. He also pointed out that the company’s rental fees have no hidden charges, and taxes are already included in the price, so the quote you get is what you pay.

Rosenberg plans to bring in more vehicles to expand the fleet but is still determining demand and logistics of where to physically keep the cars.

Rock is not the only company on Bainbridge to rent cars. Modern Collision Rebuild at 9270 Miller Rd NE has been renting cars for years, with 20 vehicles in its fleet. Office Manager Brenda explained that the company used to provide them as loaners to customers, but in time they added vehicles to help meet the local demand for rentals.

Both companies seem to believe there is enough demand to go around, especially since they are located in different parts of the Island with somewhat different business models. Rock, for example, hopes in part to cater to people coming over on the ferry. Hibbs said people can call (844-777-7625) and have a car waiting for them when they get off the boat: “Give me 35 minutes, and I’ll give you the world,” he said with a smile.

Learn more on their Facebook page.

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Photo by Sarah Lane.

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Posted in Business, Community, Popular 50 Comments

kestrel by jay wiggs

Name That Bird: The Littlest Falcon

This colorful, feisty raptor is the smallest falcon in North America. Often seen in the Pacific Northwest in open spaces along roads, on wires, and in meadows and farmland, this graceful flyer helicopters on the wing and catches a variety of large insects, small rodents, and occasionally small birds on the ground or sometimes in flight.

This dynamic, attractive bird can see ultraviolet light, enabling it to detect urine trails of rodents, such as voles, one of its primary food sources. Weighing less than 4 ounces, often this bird is prey for larger hawks, owls, crows, and even snakes.

Can you name this impressive fierce little falcon? Tell us!name that bird by jay wiggs

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spooky creatures Pele and handler Nancy LeMay

Photos courtesy of Jay Wiggs; photo of Nancy LeMay holding bird by Julie Hall.

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jim whiting

All-Comers Coach Jim Whiting Hits the Stop Watch on His Final Run

Tomorrow evening, August 25, Jim Whiting is ending his 20-year run as the coach/manager of the popular summer All-Comers track meet series.

Whiting started the free weekly meets in 1995 shortly after moving to Bainbridge Island as a way to give back to the community and connect with other runners. But with the first meet, which attracted about 25 runners, the series took off in a direction that surprised its founder.

“I thought it would appeal to adults, but from the get go it was obvious the main constituency was kids,” said Whiting. “I instituted age divisions starting with 5 and under, but once again I was wrong.” Before long, 3 and under was the youngest age category. “There were times I was looking at 36 little girls 3 and under taking off down the track,” said Whiting. “It turned out to be very positive that it became a kid-oriented event.” The average age of participants is 6.

Another early adjustment Whiting made was to retire the starter pistol because it made some kids cry. “After the second or third meet it was, ‘On your marks, get set, go!’” Whiting conceded that with about 70 races per meet and 8 or 9 meets each summer his voice is pretty hoarse by late August, in evidence in our conversation.

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Whiting coaching All Comers. Photo by Marilynn Gottlieb.

He estimates he started about 10,000 individual races through his tenure running All-Comers. As the meets became more popular, attracting some 150-160 kids each week, an efficient finish-line system of clocking and recording times became essential. Whiting explained that he had help from volunteers, including from Paul Benton, an accomplished runner in his own right and an assistant coach for the Bainbridge High School Cross Country team. Benton will take over running the All-Comers meets next season, with sponsorship from the Bainbridge Island Kiwanis.

Previous sponsors include the Bainbridge Park District, Union Bank, and local business Bainbridge Self-Storage. Whiting expressed gratitude to all three organizations for their vital assistance in making All-Comers possible over the years.

Although he’ll be resting his voice and visiting his three grandchildren more often after stepping away from All-Comers, Whiting is not hanging up his coach’s whistle. He still coaches the Blazers, the Park District’s running program for middle schoolers. Whiting started coaching the Blazers in 2008 with about 30 kids. Last season the program had 80 participants, and more are expected this fall.

The Blazers are close to home for Whiting, who describes himself as the kid always picked last for sports until he discovered running in junior high. He is thrilled that this fall three kids from the Blazers will be runners at Whitman College (his alma mater): “It blows my mind that kids who were in Blazers are now in college.”

As for his All-Comers kids, Whiting told me he doesn’t have records from the early years but it’s possible that second-generation kids have participated in the meets.

Author of some 170 children’s nonfiction books and editor of 300 more, Whitman said, “I look back on my life, and All-Comers and Blazers have been some of the most satisfying things I’ve done.”

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Lead photo courtesy of Jim Whiting. Other photo courtesy of Marilynn Gottlieb.

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Christina Albrecht Tinling

Forum Moderator Talks About ‘Bainbridge Islanders’ and Its New Bad Sibling

Even the most active participants of the Facebook forum Bainbridge Islanders don’t have the dedication to monitor every comment of every thread of the buzzing nearly 3,000-member conversation. But as the group’s administrative lead moderator, Christina Albrecht Tinling, sees it all—the good, the bad, the ugly, and just about every nuance in between.

Tinling joined the Bainbridge Islanders admin team as an assistant last December and took over as the main moderator in early March when the forum’s founder Marilynn Price Mitchell decided she had had enough of the bad and ugly and informed the small assistant administrative team that she was deleting the entire forum unless someone was willing to take it off her hands. Tinling told me she believed too much in the value of the forum as a community resource to let it go, so she stepped into the unpaid volunteer role, well-aware that Mitchell had been burned out both timewise and emotionally.

Tinling didn’t pull punches in telling me about the down side of the work. She regularly deals with anger, hurt feelings, complaints, attacks, and legal threats. She said the negative feedback outnumbers the positive by 10 to 1, especially when the conversation gets what she calls “hot” over controversial topics.

Case in point was a conversation thread last week that Tinling said heated up “in the wake of impending bulldozers” to clear forested land for the Visconsi mall. She told me the person who posted the original comment had raised very good points and that she had written him to ask that he tone down part of his comment that violated the forum’s Dos and Don’ts guidelines. She said the conversation had been a very valuable one that had garnered over 100 comments. Then it was mysteriously deleted. In response, Tinling temporarily took over exclusive control of the admin powers. And then she had a lightbulb moment.

She launched a no-holds-barred “bad sibling” splinter forum of Bainbridge Islanders. “At first there was serious blowback and the reception was static-y,” said Tinling. There was a debate about the new forum’s name and then a debate about the debate. She told the group to go with it, saying, “orangutans are skeptical of changes in their cages.” Eventually the name Radio Free Bainbridge was settled on, and things calmed down.

When I spoke with her a day or two after she started Radio Free Bainbridge, Tinling seemed practically giddy at the prospect of a place where locals, including herself, can spout off completely without moderation. ”Get your togas on and take it to the [Radio Free Bainbridge] forum,” she told Bainbridge Islanders. But Tinling is equally relieved at the prospect of taking off the pressure from Bainbridge Islanders, which she describes as “the front porch of the Island general store.” She explained: “I hold the group very lightly; I don’t like intervening and enforcing. But when a political thread gets hot each new comment bumps it to the top, and the regular practical helpful stuff gets buried.”

I mentioned that in the short time since Radio Free Bainbridge launched I had noticed people quit in disgust and then rejoin. Tinling laughed and said she calls that a “rage quit,” a phrase her kids use to describe a frustration moment during videogaming.

I asked Tinling how she handles the logistics of moderating Bainbridge Islanders. A mother of four, she told me she fits 95 percent of maintaining the site into little pockets throughout her day, mostly from her smart phone. Once a week she spends a few hours at her laptop evaluating and approving requests for membership in the forum. The criteria is not always clear cut. Tinling tries to determine what connection each person has to Bainbridge Island if they don’t live here. People with strong ties to Bainbridge, like those who work here, are obvious approvals. Others are a judgment call.

As for why she does it, Tinling said the rewards are closely tied with the challenges of the job. She said helping people work through hurt and alienation with empathy is her biggest reward—that and those two little words, “thank you.”

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Photo of Christina Albrecht Tinling by Julie Hall.

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WSF Eagle Harbor Repair Facility

Tacoma Ferry out of Service Until at Least December

Washington State Ferries (WSF) has announced that they now know the cause of the Jumbo Mark 11 Tacoma ferry’s sudden breakdown on August 8, which threw the crucial regional transportation system into chaos for days.

The repair contractor, Siemens Marine Solutions, reported that a fuse blew in the vessel’s propulsion control system. WSF said the blown fuse occurred “without indication to the operating engineers, triggering a chain of events that led to the power failure.”

WSF Communicatios Director Marta Coursey said the Tacoma is expected to remain out of service until at least December, 2o14.

WSF is continuing to review the cause of the incident and what to do about it. “A Board of Inquiry, WSF’s highest level of investigation, convened this week and expects to complete their work once the vessel repair is complete,” said Coursey.

The Tacoma is docked in Eagle Harbor at the WSF repair facility. It was sitting lit up last night, visible from the ferry terminal landing.

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Photo by Julie Hall. 

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forest at 305 and High School

Letter from the Editor: After the Death of a Forest ‘Memory Becomes the Exercise Against Loss’

 

Memory becomes the exercise against loss.             

—Ruth Stone, from her poem “Against Loss” in Simplicity

This week Ohio-based Visconsi Companies clear-cut the 8-acre forest ecosystem at the corner of High School Road and Highway 305 to make way for the erection of a widely protested mall.

What is a mere 8-acre forest? To many it has become a symbol of something much bigger than a small wooded habitat. It has come to represent what is being lost every day across our Island and across the planet—”wild” places, biodiversity, a stable climate, animals, life-giving trees and soil, shade, clean water, peace, natural beauty, and something less tangible—a moral code between the human species and the natural environment that is our home. We can fence it, cut it, burn it, and bury it under concrete in the defunct name of “progress,” but we will never own it. Rather we owe it our lives.

In geological time nature will have her way. But in the meantime, for our children and grandchildren, may this be a lesson for all of us to stand up and give our home the reverence and care it requires so in turn it can sustain us, as we require.

Bainbridge Island’s Comprehensive Plan is updated every 20 years. The revision process takes two years and has just begun for the next version of our Plan. We all need to get involved to make sure the Plan is backed by clear policy and legal muscle.

It can be easy and sometimes less painful to forget what has been lost. Here are photos of the forest as it was early this summer. May they stand as documents against forgetting.

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

forest at 305 and High School

Trees slated for cutting

forest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High Schoolforest at 305 and High School

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 Photos by Julie Hall. 

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seahawks fans in ferry terminal

Ferries Advisory for Tonight’s Seahawks Game

WSF anticipates increased foot traffic on the Seattle/Bainbridge Island ferry route today, August 22, because of a Seahawks preseason game tonight at home at CenturyLink Field at 7 p.m. against da Bears.

WSF Advice

  • Pre-purchase walk-on return ferry tickets on-line or at a kiosk.
  • Sign up to receive WSF travel alerts.

WSF Operations Plan

To help mitigate obvious burdens on the already burdened Washington State Ferries (WSF) system, WSF has set up an operations plan for today.

  • They have increased staff at the Seattle, Bainbridge, and Bremerton terminals to help load and count passengers.
  • They have added an extra sailing on the Sealth this evening (10:15 p.m. out of Bremerton and 11:30 p.m. out of Seattle).
  • Terminal supervisors will remain onsite until the event ends.
  • Managers will be present at all terminals.
  • They have increased communications to help customers plan ahead and stay informed during heavy traffic.
  • They will provide detailed travel alerts.
  • They will provide a visual paging system and intercom announcements.
  • They are working with media to help keep customers informed.

Bainbridge-to-Seattle Sailing Schedule Today 

The 202-vehicle/2499-passenger vessel Puyallup is scheduled to depart Bainbridge Island at 2:55 p.m., 4:35 p.m., and 6:30 p.m. The 202-vehicle/2499-passenger vessel Wenatchee is scheduled to depart Bainbridge Island at 2:05 p.m., 3:50 p.m., and 5:30 p.m.

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Photo by Sarah Lane.

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“Ovation!
Virginia Mason
Spelling Bee